Decreasing angler numbers a bad thing?

Jason 70

Well-known member
Points
18
Location
The congested SE
The decline in the number of anglers is obvious, not worth debating IMO. We have virtually no juniors on the river; and at 50 years of age I am one of the youngsters. There is a cottage I can see from the kitchen window that 15 years ago during the season was almost fully booked with anglers during the season; now they get maybe 4 weeks angling booking per season. Part of this could be put down to the decline of Watten but the locals are not buying permits either; and the club meetings are changing rules to facilitate the lack of attendance at meetings.
I have my doubts whether the association on the river will be viable in 10 -15 years time. So that's one negative. The bigger one will be if angling participation continues falling at present rates the anti brigade will have a far easier target without our collective voting presence.


We are of a similar age and I'm soon to be 50. I joined angling club in my kneck of the woods about 20 years ago and the membership was around 280-300 at its peak. I joined the committee a few years ago to help out. We are now down to 60 members, people are literally passing away. This is a coarse angling club that leases around 5 miles of river. The youngest of our members is around 40 years of age. This season when the river has not been in the fields I've encountered six members fishing when checking permits. I'm lucky that I'm lure fishing or latterly fishing for Pike with a fly rod so I can walk more or less all of it while out enjoying myself.

As to what the future holds angling wise, time will out I guess.
 

mike fox

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Cheshire/West Sussex
In the 2018 National Angling Survey, 38% of respondents were 65 or older; 97% were male; and 95% were white. Although angling engages people from all backgrounds, it does not engage some sections of the population as much as it should: young people, females and BAME communities.
It is from these surveys that the "evidence" is gained. This "evidence" shows that only a little over 1/3rd of anglers are of senior citizen age. Yet most people say that the majority of anglers are of senior citizen age. So who is right and where does the evidence come from. It is all projective and ambiguous.
 

mike fox

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Cheshire/West Sussex
We are of a similar age and I'm soon to be 50. I joined angling club in my kneck of the woods about 20 years ago and the membership was around 280-300 at its peak. I joined the committee a few years ago to help out. We are now down to 60 members, people are literally passing away. This is a coarse angling club that leases around 5 miles of river. The youngest of our members is around 40 years of age. This season when the river has not been in the fields I've encountered six members fishing when checking permits. I'm lucky that I'm lure fishing or latterly fishing for Pike with a fly rod so I can walk more or less all of it while out enjoying myself.

As to what the future holds angling wise, time will out I guess.
And I can equally state that in a single year when I was an active committee member of our local club I alone increased membership numbers from 107 to 169. Day tickets stood at a little over £100 and I alone increased it to £3000 in 1 year. So where did the anglers all come from if they weren't already there?
 

rabmax

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Ayrshire
What i have noticed over the years.Most of these small clubs don't have good contact information online.It's often phone'email or other information that's many many years out of date.When you do eventually find out & go along for your permit.All they do is moan about so few members these days.
 

Jason 70

Well-known member
Points
18
Location
The congested SE
And I can equally state that in a single year when I was an active committee member of our local club I alone increased membership numbers from 107 to 169. Day tickets stood at a little over £100 and I alone increased it to £3000 in 1 year. So where did the anglers all come from if they weren't already there?

Mike,

Your a better man than me, and you are to be applauded for your efforts. I doff my cap.
 

sewinbasher

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
North East Wales
Here are a couple of facts for you, I'm involved with three game fishing clubs and for the two that keep records of DoB the breakdown is as follows:

Club 1: 123 paying members of which 3 were born in the 30s, 24 in the 40s, 45 in the 50s, 28 in the 60s, 13 in the 70s, 7 in the 80s, 3 in the 90s (plus 20 non paying juniors.)

Club 2: 130 paying members of which 17 were born before 1940, 30 in the 40s, 45 in the 50s, 26 in the 60s, 9 in the 70s and 3 in the 80s or earlier

I think this confirms the general view of the demographic, at least in game fishing, coarse fishing may have a different demographic.
 

mike fox

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Cheshire/West Sussex
Mike,

Your a better man than me, and you are to be applauded for your efforts. I doff my cap.
The point is Jason. Its all about being proactive rather than being reactive which most angling clubs/anglers seem to be these days. Too much negativity and apathy which I write about in my book (as my avatar).
The potential market is huge: 31% of National Angling Survey respondents knew young people interested in doing angling and 35% knew adult friends or family interested. Extrapolated from c.900,000 licence holders, means a potential market of 250,000+ young people and 300,000+ adults.
 

mike fox

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Cheshire/West Sussex
Its hard for the younger end to fish while watching their phone :unsure:
That could be said about anything in life. You cannot disinvent these products. Its all about education in using them and if today's adults do nothing about educating the youth of today to manage the technology for their own health and wellbeing, then the whole of society will be going on an irretrievable downward spiral.
 

Paul_B

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
South Yorkshire
That could be said about anything in life. You cannot disinvent these products. Its all about education in using them and if today's adults do nothing about educating the youth of today to manage the technology for their own health and wellbeing, then the whole of society will be going on an irretrievable downward spiral.
Actually we have plenty of the younger end that go fishing in our area, it was my attempt of a bit of humour. It could be called irony, we're discussing the downward trend of fishing while looking at a forum on a phone or computer ;)

I'll get mi coat 🙄
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Points
83
means a potential market of 250,000+ young people and 300,000+ adults
When fly fishing and fly fishers become just a 'market' then its time to close the fisheries, commercial hunting is the end of the line and an open goal for policy makers.
 

mike fox

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Cheshire/West Sussex
When fly fishing and fly fishers become just a 'market' then its time to close the fisheries, commercial hunting is the end of the line and an open goal for policy makers.
It does seem to me the AT and the EA to a certain extent, are more interested in providing figures than tangible results. The angling strategies set out in the reports every 5 years are quite repetitive and we don't see any positives, only negatives and decline. So what is going wrong? Is somebody not doing their job properly and should they be sacked for not achieving set targets?
 
Top