Do Water Bailiffs Piss You Off?

ohanzee

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The last time I fished the Endrick was in my late teens after a bender, woke up late with a hangover, bundled some stuff out the fridge into a bag and set off in my sisters car, arrived at the bridge where the Blane runs in and set up, first cast and I got a bailiff marching across the field from the bridge yelling, turned out it was Sunday:D

Got pulled on the Teith too, arrived at the tackle shop in Callander at 8am for a permit, Roger still in his bed so I went down to the river for a look, just standing there and a salmon rolled right in front of me, set up a rod with hands trembling and..fkn Land Rover nearly drove over me, got a roasting for that one😱
 

Whinging pom

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It's not an easy act to pull off. Good work especially as you aren't being paid to do it! I'm sure you do but take care.
I'm always thankful that I'm too far north for much pikey action, dread the fellows turning up.

Interesting that anglers fall into two camps, those unhappy because they never see a bailiff and those unhappy when they do see one :rolleyes:


Andy
!

My mates a game keeper on a big estate where people come to poach deer and net the lakes of carp. He goes out with his Alsatian at night on patrol and it can be a war zone with chases and fists. Maybe the stakes are higher , but I think some of it is by using aggression you invite aggression back and resentment which invites more determined visits.
On the brook I don’t worry for myself too much, Im a lone guy whose confident and I let them know I’m not the problem for them, the problems on the way!
What really concerns me is if any of the older members get exposed to it and lose their tempers or if a younger members gets his hackles up and ends up finding he’s up against a group of pikey bare knuckle fighters.
It can soon escalate beyond knicking a few tout .., but for the police it’s just another low level rural crime, that’s “no worse than littering the streets” as one local cop told me a few years back, and the only guaranteed response from them is when there has been an assault.

I can imagine for professional bailiffs it can be really challenging never knowing if the next conversation will turn to conflict.

My only meeting with Scottish ones was on the last day on the river after four thin blank days of scratching around catching herling and parr . The water was rising a bit and I was finally catching some trout and there were salmon starting to jump around me and then two bailiffs turned up in a van,
they shouted over to ask if I was one of the English party staying at the lodge. Once I confirmed I was they shouted that it was raining up in the mountains above and i needed to get out of the river ASAP as the water would soon be up.
OK I shouted thinking I’d get a last 15mins.
NOW! They shouted back leaving no room for discussion.
10 mins later I was back in my car watching the torrent in the rocky gully that I couldn’t imagine getting out of.
I later found out they tracked down the 5 others in the party and warned them out of the water too.
 

Rhithrogena

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10 mins later I was back in my car watching the torrent in the rocky gully that I couldn’t imagine getting out of.
I once had a very scary time on the Torridge when, having waded up a section with vertical high banks, the river rose about three feet in literally a couple of minutes after a cloud burst up on the moor. I escaped with nothing worse than flooded waders, but got a bad fright.
If any of you are ever wading and you notice the water suddenly getting a little cloudy and a little frothy with a few leaves and sticks coming down; take the hint and get out of the water, a spate is on the way...
Rich
 

Vermontdrifter

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In Luxembourg it’s the police who ask for your licence and I’ve been checked at least once per season. Biggest hassle with them is that they will use the loudspeaker on their vehicle to tell you to come over. So you then have to get out of the river and walk a hundred meters to the road to prove you have your licence on you!
 

aenoon

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Linlithgow, Scotland and anywhere i can wet a line
On the upside in the river bailiff defence---
I know many that spend nights out in all weathers monitoring their waters, night sights et al, trying to combat poachers netting said waters, or otherwise fishing illegally.
I also know a couple whom have had vehicles burnt out whilst outside their homes purely because they did their jobs well.
So sure, it might piss you off if they aproach you at night, but that is their job after all!
 

GEK79

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Ireland
When night fishing there has been many a night where I have had a run in with them. Having said that, the real truth is, at the time they were only carrying out their job where without them out patrolling in all weathers the river would have been in a pretty sorry state. At the same time they could have taken a course on how to carry out what was their job in a much better manor. According to them, with me being that ***** that never caught any fish, (that is exactly what I wanted them to think, if only they knew the truth) I actually got on quite well with the water bailiffs but there was many a night where they totally pissed me off.
There was this particular night that comes to mind where I totally lost the plot with them. Working from 2-30pm to 10-00pm printing one of the early Harry Potter books and working with the number one printer on the machine that did not have a clue what he was doing, it was not only a very hard, but a difficult shift. Twenty years I was on with this guy where no one could understand how he kept his job. It was either a masonic thing or he had some hold over the management. I used to say to him that the only time he did any real printing, it was at a time when his mother bought him a John Bull kit for Christmas. Having had a right rubbish shift at work I was going night fishing to relax and forget all about work,
Although it had been raining most of the day by the time I get to the river it would still be running high but clean. There should not many, (if any) other anglers on the river for most of them read books where fortunately the experts that write them, they will tell you that it is a complete waste of time fishing for sea trout at when the river is high. I arrived at this nice quiet pool, set up my rod in total darkness so not to disturb any fish and then started to fish. After having just put in a most frustrating shift at work I was now relaxed where I did not have a care in the world. I was now totally on my own and looking forward to a nights fishing. I though I was alone for I had no sooner started fishing when out jumped two keepers with torches full ablaze. They should not be able to react like that, just supposing I was a person with a heart condition, it could well be an ambulance they would be sending for. First of all I had to wind in and show them the flies I was using for the maximum size we could use at that time was a size 8. I was only fishing with one fly and it was a size 8 bit it had a trailing small treble. 'What the hells this you have got on?' Seeing the small treble hook and what was a rather large looking fly, right away they thought that they had got a capture, someone fishing illegally. I had to explain to them that it would be very hard to foul hook a fish with that for it is made with cork, it floats on the surface, it is a Hugh Falkus floating lure. I had to then demonstrate it floating on the river to convince them where with torches flashing they then clocked the fly line I was using, it was a brown floating line. That was another complaint, 'You don't get brown floating lines'. You do if you buy them from the MacKenzie-Philps Yorkshire Fly Fishing Tackle firm. A frustrating shift at work followed by a much wasted night, ruined by water bailiffs flashing torches all over the place thus wasting not only my night vision, more important also the pool, I am going home to my bed. I am not ruling out a blank night yet for I could pick up some road kill on the way home that can be cooked for the dogs.
My first encounter with bailiffs was on my favourite loch the weather was shocking I'd huddled under a cliff with a hit mug of tea when through the rain I heard two voices..
First question I was asked was what are you fishing for.. I chuckled and said brown trout then they said they had been watching me and wanted to chat.. They were decent fellas and I would see them on the river.. A good experience overall... And good to see them doing there job..
 

ohanzee

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For anyone on the right side of the law a bailiff should be a welcome sight, they can be a bit curt but they are used to a less than warm reception, I watched one tackle five poachers with a police woman once, I offered to help and they told me to stay back for my own safety, the police woman came back carrying a machete.
The poachers legged it but they didn't get far, one of the bailiffs disabled their car, when the rest of the police arrived they were stopped at the side of the road with the bonnet up, sorted.

Bailiffs know their water, when the water is right, when fish are running, where poachers are likely to be, the car can be checked with the police and they can know the poachers name before they even locate them, it's a dumb poacher that doesn't know that the bailiff knows they are coming at that time and usually place.
 

loxie

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The last bailliff I encountered was a very nice chap. Sadly for me he witnessed, along with a few others, me loosing a fish as I was trying to land it.
 

eddleston123

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Peebles, Scottish Borders
Fished the Tweed for near on 60 years. Been asked for my ticket once.

It's no wonder that people don't bother paying for a ticket. The worst that can happen is that they could be asked to leave the water.



Douglas
 

Paul_B

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Nov 14, 2008
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West Riding of Yorkshire
We have a free stretch nearby where the EA wander during close season, other than that the only time I've been ask about a permit was by Ghillie George at Dryburgh, I told him that I use a complimentary ticket and gave details, later that day he came to my side of the river called me by name and gave me some tips. He must have checked out my story to know my name (y)
 
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