Double haul in windy conditions?

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
1,961
Location
South Northants
I was at a BFCC meeting at the Sportfish venue a while back and on this particular day there was a stiff breeze blowing off the lake from behind the casting positions. My back cast was suffering badly in this wind and Mike Marshall took me to one side and had me practice releasing the line on the back cast.

You mean, turning your back to the water so effectively your back cast becomes your forward cast.
 

stevie d

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2009
Messages
1,052
Location
Merthyr Tydfil
Sorry Stevie what do you mean by making the back cast the final shoot?

@easker1 do you mean when fishing from the bank?
I'm in a boat fishing from a seated position, legs on the gunnels to save my back.

Thanks Al
I have not worded this very well, basically Mike had me practicing my casts making the delivery or final cast off the back hand, so basically casting backwards. In order to make a good length cast this way all the elements have to be in place(loop shape, timing etc.) He told me to practice at home and said when you can achieve a distance of 75 feet or so getting a decent back cast into the wind won't be so difficult. When fishing if you have a crosswind blowing from the same side as your casting arm you should then be able to turn and face the bank and still get a decent line out into the lake releasing off the back cast!
 

easker1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 10, 2010
Messages
7,361
Location
Highlands
I'm a Bank fisher, I can't see any need for double hauling in a boat, you are drifting down to the fish all the time, I generally roll cast in the boat,easker1
 

stevie d

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2009
Messages
1,052
Location
Merthyr Tydfil
You mean, turning your back to the water so effectively your back cast becomes your forward cast.
Yes this is what I meant. By practicing this away from fishing situations I have improved my back cast a great deal and it is a good tool to have in aforementioned adverse crosswinds. I don't fish from a boat.
 

speytime

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,568
Location
West Lothian Scotland
I'm a Bank fisher, I can't see any need for double hauling in a boat, you are drifting down to the fish all the time, I generally roll cast in the boat,easker1
I find myself double hauling as standard except on the river when I'm only working with the head or x amount outside the rod tip, in a sense it's easier to haul than not, i can get the line speed going with much less effort.

Al
 

speytime

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,568
Location
West Lothian Scotland
Yes this is what I meant. By practicing this away from fishing situations I have improved my back cast a great deal and it is a good tool to have in aforementioned adverse crosswinds. I don't fish from a boat.
I've got a Joan Wulf dvd, she shows a similar thing, she faces the wind puts the cast out but then turns, so the final cast is of the forward stroke.

I never thought of mentioning this in my original post but I'm using a boat seat and casting from a seated position?

Thanks Al
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
1,961
Location
South Northants
I've got a Joan Wulf dvd, she shows a similar thing, she faces the wind puts the cast out but then turns, so the final cast is of the forward stroke.

That is what is known as the Galway cast. Often used if the breeze is in the wrong direction. ie coming from the right if you're a right handed caster. The caster stands with his/her back to the breeze, performs the back cast as a forward cast, then turns the wrist and sends the forward cast. A useful safety cast to keep the fly line away from the body, also if the back cast is crowded you can place the back cast between trees / obstructions etc or indeed use the thumb being behind the handle on the back cast to produce a steeple cast.
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
1,949
Location
Scotland
That is what is known as the Galway cast. Often used if the breeze is in the wrong direction. ie coming from the right if you're a right handed caster. The caster stands with his/her back to the breeze, performs the back cast as a forward cast, then turns the wrist and sends the forward cast. A useful safety cast to keep the fly line away from the body, also if the back cast is crowded you can place the back cast between trees / obstructions etc or indeed use the thumb being behind the handle on the back cast to produce a steeple cast.

For on-shoulder wind it is much easier casting over the opposite shoulder rather than over complicate things.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
1,961
Location
South Northants
For on-shoulder wind it is much easier casting over the opposite shoulder rather than over complicate things.

The Galway cast is effectively an opposite shoulder cast. How far you turn your back to the wind is a reflection of the strength of the wind and the caster's ability.
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
1,949
Location
Scotland
The Galway cast is effectively an opposite shoulder cast. How far you turn your back to the wind is a reflection of the strength of the wind and the caster's ability.

My understanding of Galway cast was forward cast in both directions? Maybe I am wrong.
 

noddy299

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 12, 2017
Messages
299
Location
Durham
If the wind is on my "wrong" shoulder I face away from the water and just cast backwards. I am working on my left handed casting but thats a while away from being useable on anything other than a stream/small river really
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
1,949
Location
Scotland
That's what I described - effected by turning the wrist between the 'back' and forward cast.
Which I find is more compicated than casting over the other shoulder without rotating wrist during back cast and then on fwd cast.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
1,961
Location
South Northants
Which I find is more compicated than casting over the other shoulder without rotating wrist during back cast and then on fwd cast.

The main reason for rotating the wrist is that it allows you to look backwards at where your 'back cast' is going - ie. between trees or other obstacles etc which you can't do from a 'square' position facing forward off your left shoulder. (y)

Edit . . . unless, of course, you're an owl!
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
1,949
Location
Scotland
The main reason for rotating the wrist is that it allows you to look backwards at where your 'back cast' is going - ie. between trees or other obstacles etc which you can't do from a 'square' position facing forward off your left shoulder. (y)

Edit . . . unless, of course, you're an owl!
Yes, I can see it is useful when there is an obstruction in the back.
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
1,949
Location
Scotland
Rollcasting with tail wind the other day was great fun. Easy getting 50-60ft (airflo superflo head is 42ft, 11ft leader 9ft rod)
 

Overmiwadrers

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 25, 2018
Messages
474
Location
Yorkshire
Was in Caya Coco with Alex a few years ago on a skiff the wind got up and it was blowing a hooley . the water had got stirred up and we werent fishing to sighted fish anymore just the muddied areas. Great fun he had me hauling hard into the low back cast then launching the forward cast high and letting the wind take it. Wasnt very pretty but Jesus you could cast a long way. happy days .


O M W
 

silver creek

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
731
Was in Caya Coco with Alex a few years ago on a skiff the wind got up and it was blowing a hooley . the water had got stirred up and we werent fishing to sighted fish anymore just the muddied areas. Great fun he had me hauling hard into the low back cast then launching the forward cast high and letting the wind take it. Wasnt very pretty but Jesus you could cast a long way. happy days .


O M W

Reverse Belgian Cast?
 
Top