Droppers

eddleston123

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 3, 2012
Messages
10,027
Location
Peebles, Scottish Borders
Not being the best of casters, I never fish with any more than one dropper.

To prevent tangles, I fish with a relatively short dropper (around 4 - 5'') However, I still get tangles.

It's been suggested to me that I should try a stiffer type of mono such as Seagur Riverge Fluorocarbon
for the dropper, as this would stand out better from the leader. I use leader rings.
The only concern that I would have is that the fly (usually a traditional wet) would not act naturally
due to the stiffness.

My still water fishing is usually for wild brownies on reservoirs and Lochs, with the occasional
still water bow foray during the close season.

Any suggestions welcome.



Douglas
 

dgp

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2013
Messages
502
Location
Wales.
Not being the best of casters, I never fish with any more than one dropper.

To prevent tangles, I fish with a relatively short dropper (around 4 - 5'') However, I still get tangles.

It's been suggested to me that I should try a stiffer type of mono such as Seagur Riverge Fluorocarbon
for the dropper, as this would stand out better from the leader. I use leader rings.
The only concern that I would have is that the fly (usually a traditional wet) would not act naturally
due to the stiffness.

My still water fishing is usually for wild brownies on reservoirs and Lochs, with the occasional
still water bow foray during the close season.

Any suggestions welcome.



Douglas
Douglas
I can relate very closely to your experiences and type of fishing. Droppers often drive me mad !. Yes they work fine if I fish a stiffer short fluorocarbon sush as airflo G3 at the higher breaking strains - and I prefer a dropper knot than a ring. However the wild brownies I fish for with traditional wets (in the hill lakes and usually windy) are very canny and any tangles or even line flash will put them off. Often if I go to one fly on a lower diameter line my catch rate goes up and it's less hassle. I too would be very interested in how people get on with 2 or more droppers for a windy hill loch !
 

Rhithrogena

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
1,584
I too would be very interested in how people get on with 2 or more droppers for a windy hill loch !
I use a tapered butt of about 6-8 feet (I cut a bit off the fat end of a 9' tapered leader). I join level tippet to this with two droppers one at 6', one at 9', total length 12' or so.
If casting INTO the wind, I cut off the point and first dropper and go with two flies on a 9' leader....
This is my usual wet fly set-up at a very windy 'hill loch' - Colliford Lake in Cornwall.
 

Scotty90

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Messages
1,060
Location
Sunny Edinburgh
Open up your casting stroke and dip the rod tip a bit more, especially on the back cast, this will make the line loop wider and the droppers have less chance to tangle with the main line or one and other. Use stiffer cast material like you already suggested.

Try back to back uni knots in the mainline and use the long tag end (downward facing) for droppers and put a wee over hand knot around the mainline with the dropper.

lastly, using flies like winged wets, curved hook buzzers, cdc dries and boobies on droppers will not help at all with line twist and this will lead to tangles if you’re not vigilant.
 

Tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
6,761
I rarely fish without at least one dropper and I think I can blame almost all the tangles I get on bad casting. Not generally in routine casting but either a tired cast or a clumsy and hasty change of direction cast to cover a distant riser. I know better but still do it.

If you're making smooth, straight-line casts with good acceleration and stops it's really hard to get a tangle. But we can't do that 100% all day. I find that when I get tired, the forward stop in my cast gets lower and acceleration to it becomes erratic and that can end in a big pile up. I generally swear a bit and have a coffee.
 

Mrwayne

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
150
Location
UK
got a few tips from nymphing that might help.
1. don't tie droppers on rings, use a triple surgeons or something similar
2. keep tension throughout the cast. when there is no tension on the leader it can twist and knot up. Probably slow down the back and forward casts and feel the tension in the line.
3. also accept that tangles are going to happen and it's a risk of having multiple flies
 

eddleston123

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 3, 2012
Messages
10,027
Location
Peebles, Scottish Borders
Douglas
I can relate very closely to your experiences and type of fishing. Droppers often drive me mad !. Yes they work fine if I fish a stiffer short fluorocarbon sush as airflo G3 at the higher breaking strains - and I prefer a dropper knot than a ring. However the wild brownies I fish for with traditional wets (in the hill lakes and usually windy) are very canny and any tangles or even line flash will put them off. Often if I go to one fly on a lower diameter line my catch rate goes up and it's less hassle. I too would be very interested in how people get on with 2 or more droppers for a windy hill loch !
I am talking mainly about fishing on windy days (nearly always windy at the reservoir). If I want to get down a bit, I will fish a single gold bead.

I take my hat of to anglers who can manage to fish droppers up to 12'' without tangling!



Douglas
 
  • Like
Reactions: dgp

JCP

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
3,045
Location
Dorset Wilts Borders & Baja
Douglas just try not using tippet rings or put a buffer knot in the ring below your dropper knot to stop the dropper sliding down against the leader where it is prone to tangle.Use a reasonable diameter tippet.Try making your dropper separate from the tippet to a sensible length for windy conditions by using a perfection loop and cutting to length required.You need a stop knot in the tippet which should be the normal water or figure 8 knot.Dropper is looped around the tippet pulled up and slid down against the stop knot.This will provide stand off.Less tangles and easy dropper replacement.
 

BobP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,395
Location
Wiltshire
In the first place there is nothing that can be done to make a leader guaranteed tangle-free. All we can do is to make it as manageable as we can. So, this is my way to doing so :-

Stillwaters.
1) do not cast into wind unless using a shorter leader with a single fly. Uprate by 1-2 line weights if possible.
2) keep the flies at least 5' apart.
3) heaviest/slimmest on the point, then bushier, then bushiest if using 3 flies. The bushier flies slow down first in the air thus facilitating turnover of the point fly.
4) keep the leader make-up as simple as possible. Just a straight through leader with 1 or 2 droppers Fig 8 knotted onto the leader.
5) Droppers to be no more than 8" and preferably 6" if the wind is gusty.
6) no striving to cast as far as possible. This will result in poor timing and tangles.

Rivers.
Very much the same as above though it may not be necessary to uprate the line weight. Long casting is not often required on rivers either and is often counter-productive.
 

eddleston123

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 3, 2012
Messages
10,027
Location
Peebles, Scottish Borders
Coincidentally, I was reading an old copy of T&S last night - Feb 2020 pg. 47 - Part of the advice given re dropper length was-

''Most anglers that have had issues with tangling, shorten the length of their leader. This does not help.
If anything, I suggest trying one a little longer !! '' Ronnie Glass

Not entirely sure about that, but he seems to know stuff.

I will take on the advice re stiffer mono - I'll be down at the reservoir next week and will be using Riverge Grand Max fluro for my leader and dropper. I'll try a 6'' dropper, dispense with the leader ring and see how I get on.

Thanks all for advice. Much appreciated.



Douglas
 
Last edited:

morayfisher

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 5, 2016
Messages
2,712
Location
Moray, Scotland
Douglas just try not using tippet rings or put a buffer knot in the ring below your dropper knot to stop the dropper sliding down against the leader where it is prone to tangle.Use a reasonable diameter tippet.Try making your dropper separate from the tippet to a sensible length for windy conditions by using a perfection loop and cutting to length required.You need a stop knot in the tippet which should be the normal water or figure 8 knot.Dropper is looped around the tippet pulled up and slid down against the stop knot.This will provide stand off.Less tangles and easy dropper replacement.
The figure of eight is a stronger stopper knot than the water knot. And you only have to pass everything through the loop once.
 

rabmax

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 11, 2009
Messages
1,920
Location
Ayrshire
I like the fo8 dropper giving it 3 turns with my forceps.When the dropper gets too short for any more fly changes.I snip the dropper off close .Then make a fo8 dropper loop.Then simply loop round & slide down till it reaches the fo8 stop knot.You are now using a rotating dropper.I don't do still waters though.My fishing is rivers only these days.Everyone should know how to tie the fo8 knot.(In my opinion)😀
 

Elwyman

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2006
Messages
692
Location
North Wales
Droppers. I tend to fish one dropper for trout, sea trout and sometimes for salmon in low water. Some good advice above. As others say, I think casting style is a big factor.....some days I can go all day without tangles, others it's a right pain! An observation......I tend to get less tangles when sea trout fishing, probably because I'm more careful and casting a more open loop, and not 'going for distance' as much.
 

Latest posts

Top