Dry fly for Rudd

jerryrum

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May 13, 2016
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Milton Keynes and Leighton Buzzard
I managed to get out for an hour and a half on the quarry lake last night. I started off using a nymph, after my success with it the other day, but it soon became apparent the Rudd were taking dries on the surface.

I tied on some size 18 dries (grey wollf and black and peacock but with a white hackle) and immediately started getting hits.

I spent a frustrating half hour missing every take that came (and there were plenty). I thought about changing flies, but the fish were obviously interested, I just couldn't connect.

Eventually I hit on the correct method. I didn't strike at the first swirl (some were outright aggressive splashes) but just tightened the line, then I lifted in to the tweak.

I think the Rudd must have been hitting the live flies first, to sink them into the film, then coming back to take them properly.

Once I had realised this I got a fish every few minutes:
fl1.PNG

Nothing big, but at least I got a dry fly session in:
fl2.PNG

As beautiful as the setting is, there's always a reminder you are not far out of town:
fl3.PNG

There was a mix of naturals hatching, a lot of them looked grey in the air, but green when I grabbed them. Nothing like either of my artificials in either size or colour:

fl4.PNG


A very pleasant way to spend the evening
fl5.PNG

and look how clear the water is:
 

kerryjordan

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Aug 1, 2009
Messages
88
I managed to get out for an hour and a half on the quarry lake last night. I started off using a nymph, after my success with it the other day, but it soon became apparent the Rudd were taking dries on the surface.

I tied on some size 18 dries (grey wollf and black and peacock but with a white hackle) and immediately started getting hits.

I spent a frustrating half hour missing every take that came (and there were plenty). I thought about changing flies, but the fish were obviously interested, I just couldn't connect.

Eventually I hit on the correct method. I didn't strike at the first swirl (some were outright aggressive splashes) but just tightened the line, then I lifted in to the tweak.

I think the Rudd must have been hitting the live flies first, to sink them into the film, then coming back to take them properly.

Once I had realised this I got a fish every few minutes:
View attachment 26620

Nothing big, but at least I got a dry fly session in:
View attachment 26621

As beautiful as the setting is, there's always a reminder you are not far out of town:
View attachment 26622

There was a mix of naturals hatching, a lot of them looked grey in the air, but green when I grabbed them. Nothing like either of my artificials in either size or colour:

View attachment 26623


A very pleasant way to spend the evening
View attachment 26624

and look how clear the water is:
Thats really interesting; I had a similar experience 3 nights ago with rudd; I was using a sparsely hackled dry fly and was missing takes until the fly became waterlogged and started to sink very slowly; I then caught a good number. They are stunning fish at any size but I would like to find a way to target the larger fish. I intend to try an old Crabtree trick of anchoring half a stale loaf near reedbeds to see if that helps.
 

kenneth

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Sep 7, 2009
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434
Location
Rome, Italy
Rob, from the looks of the mouth (lower lip overhanging the upper) and the position of the dorsal fin behind the pelvic fin, they're most probably Rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus). Rudd will also readily take dry flies, whereas Roach are bottom feeders.

Here in Italy, Rudd (and also Chub, among other Cyprinids) have fins that are not so pronouncedly red. Here's a typical example from a lake in Central Italy, taken on a dry fly:


Keep safe,
Kenneth
 

Rob Edmunds

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May 8, 2008
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Midlands Reservoirs
I see your example has the dorsal fin behind the pelvic but the initial photo still looks like a roach to my untrained eye...not that I'm an expert by any means


Personally I've never knowingly caught a Rudd....but this was my first fish after lockdown at Elinor Trout Fishery in Northamptonshire last week

Caught on a size 16 buzzer under a dry about 2ft deep

I assumed it was a Roach, but was it actually a Rudd??

Your opinion is gratefully received.

IMG-20200516-WA0001.jpg
 
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jerryrum

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May 13, 2016
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262
Location
Milton Keynes and Leighton Buzzard
[/QUOTE]
Personally I've never knowingly caught a Rudd....but this was my first fish after lockdown at Elinor Trout Fishery in Northamptonshire last week

Caught on a size 16 buzzer under a dry about 2ft deep

I assumed it was a Roach, but was it actually a Rudd??

Your opinion is gratefully received.


[/QUOTE]

I think we've established that I can't tell the difference, but either way, that is a nice fish.
 

danielp

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Apr 1, 2009
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2,331
Location
South East England
I see your example has the dorsal fin behind the pelvic but the initial photo still looks like a roach to my untrained eye...not that I'm an expert by any means


Personally I've never knowingly caught a Rudd....but this was my first fish after lockdown at Elinor Trout Fishery in Northamptonshire last week

Caught on a size 16 buzzer under a dry about 2ft deep

I assumed it was a Roach, but was it actually a Rudd??

Your opinion is gratefully received.

View attachment 26704
Pretty sure that Rob's is a roach and Jerry's are rudd. I find the mouth is the easiest way to tell them apart until you get in the murky world of the hybrids. Nice roach as well Rob, those fins are crazy.
 

Rob Edmunds

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Midlands Reservoirs
Thanks......yes I was pretty surprised, and also very happy ....a nice fish.

Roach....good enough for me - so I still haven't caught a Rudd on the fly ( or on bait for that matter) .....
 

jerryrum

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May 13, 2016
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262
Location
Milton Keynes and Leighton Buzzard
I made it back down to the quarry again yesterday.

In the middle of a hot sunny day there wasn't much movement on the surface, but I started of with the dries as I'd had such fun with them last time.

I had no luck in my usual spot so I set off exploring. There are no formal paths and and the undergrowth is left to it's own devices, so it's interesting getting around, rod in hand.

It also means that while the lake is a decent size, the water is only accessible in a few places, and when you do make it to the waters edge:
ki3.PNG

I eventually found a spot with minimal reeds and weeds, but the trees behind limited my casting ability:
ki1.PNG

When I did get the fly out on to the water there were swirls of interest, but no takes. Unlike the other day, there weren't even hits that took the fly under. I added a small split shot to take the fly under, and started catching fish on a slow retrieve:
ki2.PNG

It seems like the fish are not particular about fly pattern, but certainly feed at different levels at different times of the day.
 
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