Dying sooty olive

steviec36

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May 25, 2013
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Hi guys I’m looking to dye some feathers sooty olive I haven’t been able to find any solid information on the dye mix and method I’d be greatful if anyone can help
 

wsbailey

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The easiest thing to do is dye yellow on top of dark grey or black materials. This recipe is for natural dyes. Synthetic dyes are simpler.

Art of Fly Making 1855

A sooty olive may be made by dyeing black
hackles in yellow first with alum water, add
fresh yellow stuff three times to the dye pot,
and dip them in potashes.
 
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doobrysnatcher

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how do you make alum water and coperas?
MORDANT
ALUM POTASSIUM ALLUMINIUM SULPHATE
CHROME POTTASIUM DICHROMATE,BICHROMATE ETC ETC
 
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wsbailey

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I agree. Blacker meant natural black hackles. Dyed black is usually a very dark blue so that's why people often dye orange first to kill the blue. You might have luck over dyeing with brown.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I got a nice piece of sooty olive roe by accident. I was aiming for chocolate brown. I used a mix of yellow, magenta and black. I have seen on previous occasions that deer hair is quick to accept yellow and slow to accept magenta. On this occasion it was typically quick to accept the yellow, a bit slower to accept the black... but never did accept the magenta. I ended up with a bath of magenta dye... and a piece of sooty olive deer hair...

Piece of deer hair dyed yellow on the left for reference. Yellow + grey = olive...


Col
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I had a go at doing a few bits and pieces sooty olive, using the CMYK principle of: Olive = Black (grey) & Yellow.

I did a white cock cape, plus some seal's fur in Veniard iron blue dun (3% w/w) until they were a good shade. Then I over-dyed them in EBEST fluorescent yellow (3% w/w). That gave me a good result with the seal's fur. When the cape had dried, it was a dark olive. I thought it could do with being a bit less green/bit darker yet, so I over-dyed it with Veniard blue dun (2% w/w). I settled for that.

For the deer hair, I put the piece in a combined bath of 3% w/w Veniard iron blue dun and 3% w/w EBEST fluo yellow. That gave me a good result.

Here are the 3 of them...


And here are a couple of flies putting the above into practice...
Sooty-Olive-Muddler_3950.jpg

Sooty-Olive-Dabbler_3947.jpg

One further experiment...
I did a piece of deer hair in a bath of 3% w/w EBEST fluo yellow, plus 2% w/w Veniard black... just to see...

This was the result...


Col
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Another bit of experimenting on this theme...

I wanted a hen cape to go with the cock. I started with a white cape. This time I did the fluorescent yellow bath first (3% w/w). That gave me a good bright yellow cape as a base. I then overdyed the cape in a combined blue dun/iron blue dun bath (2.25% w/w of each).

Result...

I could maybe have gone even darker with a bit longer in the grey bath, but it looked almost black when I took it out, sopping wet. It has now dried lighter, and you are seeing it under bright photographic lighting. I think it will be dark enough when in use.

One interesting aspect is that, by using fluorescent yellow to make the base colour, it retains some degree of fluorescence...


Col
 

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