Eating of shot game

ejw

Well-known member
Points
18
Location
Helsby, Cheshire
I have followed this thread and may have some input ?
I am old enough to remember Bow hunting in England (now illegal to hunt live quarry). This was made an example of by the "anti's and as there were only 2 clubs that hunted, they did not get support from others, hence a change to the law.
I was a "Wildfowler" along with my Father, we also shot game. My Grandfather was a market gardener for 30 years after retiring ? This meant that for our first 10 years my wife and I were self sufficient. We spent nothing on food or flowers. Unfortunately this did not continue, why ? Costs rose rapidly, land and club rents, licences, cartridges etc. When lead was banned over water cost rose by 300% and that was for Steel ! A very poor substitute. It got so it was cheaper to buy meat from Tesco's than shoot. I continued for some years, but restrictions, tightening up on licences, rents(again) costs of Clubs made it un cost effective to continue.
As an aside when lead was partially banned expensive gun prices fell, I was at an auction where a pair of Boss guns went for £1600 and a Purdy less than £700. (1980's)
While I have no qualms about killing for the pot, I will not be renewing my gun licence in June. I have enjoyed my "shooting" over the past 60 years. Unfortunately in resent years there has been an increase in people who just kill for pleasure, with no interest in eating what they shoot.
With my fishing I can be more relaxed and practice C & R when is allowed. I keep the odd fish and again I know it is not cost effective, but it does get me out.
I can see shooting falling by the wayside within the next generation, with fishing following that. Sorry if this is negative, but just following trends.

FYI - I have been a Wildfowling Club Chairman, Shoot captain in syndicates, run Clay Clubs, helped run a commercial shoot (lots of stories there !!) Run a fishery, chairman of a river club etc
The future looks bleak.
Eddie
 

BobP

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Wiltshire
Your "the fishery concerned" that you also said is "flyfisher222's stockpond on the Test" is of course a reference to where I mostly fish. As I said, I am not getting into your "stockpond" comment.
OK, my fault. Wrong end of stick.

However, the guys concerned ARE being paid. They are paid by the estate, so I guess it could either be a day guiding or go grass cutting or whatever task needs doing. The river keepers I referred to who go picking up on the estate where they work don't get paid on the week day shoots. They are already paid for working whether it is working on the river or picking up. They DO get paid for Saturdays as they made the case some time ago that they could go picking up elsewhere on a weekend so if the estate wants them to pick up they should be paid the going rate.
 

flyfisher222

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
Hampshire UK
OK, my fault. Wrong end of stick.

However, the guys concerned ARE being paid. They are paid by the estate, so I guess it could either be a day guiding or go grass cutting or whatever task needs doing. The river keepers I referred to who go picking up on the estate where they work don't get paid on the week day shoots. They are already paid for working whether it is working on the river or picking up. They DO get paid for Saturdays as they made the case some time ago that they could go picking up elsewhere on a weekend so if the estate wants them to pick up they should be paid the going rate.
Yeah. And the guiding our guys do is not really 'free' of course, we all end up sharing the costs of the four keeper's wages/quite nice cottages/land rovers, etc. whatever they do. (Outside the trout season it's mostly bank work, maintaining bridges, huts, etc.) And weed cutting boats cost a fortune and can't be shared as everyone has to do it on the same set dates, near enough.
 

Dingbat

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
Switzerland
I have followed this thread and may have some input ?
I am old enough to remember Bow hunting in England (now illegal to hunt live quarry). This was made an example of by the "anti's and as there were only 2 clubs that hunted, they did not get support from others, hence a change to the law.
I was a "Wildfowler" along with my Father, we also shot game. My Grandfather was a market gardener for 30 years after retiring ? This meant that for our first 10 years my wife and I were self sufficient. We spent nothing on food or flowers. Unfortunately this did not continue, why ? Costs rose rapidly, land and club rents, licences, cartridges etc. When lead was banned over water cost rose by 300% and that was for Steel ! A very poor substitute. It got so it was cheaper to buy meat from Tesco's than shoot. I continued for some years, but restrictions, tightening up on licences, rents(again) costs of Clubs made it un cost effective to continue.
As an aside when lead was partially banned expensive gun prices fell, I was at an auction where a pair of Boss guns went for £1600 and a Purdy less than £700. (1980's)
While I have no qualms about killing for the pot, I will not be renewing my gun licence in June. I have enjoyed my "shooting" over the past 60 years. Unfortunately in resent years there has been an increase in people who just kill for pleasure, with no interest in eating what they shoot.
With my fishing I can be more relaxed and practice C & R when is allowed. I keep the odd fish and again I know it is not cost effective, but it does get me out.
I can see shooting falling by the wayside within the next generation, with fishing following that. Sorry if this is negative, but just following trends.

FYI - I have been a Wildfowling Club Chairman, Shoot captain in syndicates, run Clay Clubs, helped run a commercial shoot (lots of stories there !!) Run a fishery, chairman of a river club etc
The future looks bleak.
Eddie
I wasn't allow to shoot as a kid because in those days if you registered a gun you could expect a follow-up visit from the provos, something which my family would prefer to avoid, equally my father wasn't prepared to live with an unregistered shotgun in the house. I always imagined at a later age I'd take it up - with the full intention of eating what I kill - with a bottle of claret.
 

BobP

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Wiltshire
Took myself on a little trip to a game dealers yesterday and bought 6 pheasants plus a kilo of diced venison for the staggering price of £19. Should get 10 good meals for two from that plus cold pheasant leftovers to make sandwich lunch for me half a dozen times.
 

speytime

Well-known member
Points
83
Location
West Lothian Scotland
Did anyone keep ferrets?
Ferreting rabbits was a popular sport around my area when I was a boy, I'd love to have a day out ferreting now that I'm older i remember it being fun, that's if rabbits ever do recover.
That aside I'd just like a pair to eat.

Al
 

JayP

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
St Neots, Cambs
Did anyone keep ferrets?
Ferreting rabbits was a popular sport around my area when I was a boy, I'd love to have a day out ferreting now that I'm older i remember it being fun, that's if rabbits ever do recover.
That aside I'd just like a pair to eat.

Al
I ferreted for three winters with a mate until I was 15, had some great times and made good money selling rabbits to the local butcher. As a young teen it was very exciting hearing the thump of rabbit feet below you before they hit the nets as well as constantly looking over your shoulder for the farmer and the fun that could entail. Still remember the blood, guts and flea bites!

This guy is a master of the art

 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
113
Location
Embra
I ferreted for three winters with a mate until I was 15, had some great times and made good money selling rabbits to the local butcher. As a young teen it was very exciting hearing the thump of rabbit feet below you before they hit the nets as well as constantly looking over your shoulder for the farmer and the fun that could entail. Still remember the blood, guts and flea bites!

This guy is a master of the art

Only involvement I've had with ferrets was going rabbit hunting with a couple of harris hawks. The guy who owned them put a ferret down into the warren to flush the rabbits out. We stood there with the hawks on our gloves waiting for a rabbit to bolt. When it did, the hawk launched itself after it. What surprised me most was the. 'kill or get killed trying' determination of the birds. You'd think with delicate feathers that they depend on they would be wary of getting any damage to them. But they were just totally reckless in their determination to get their kill. If getting dragged through a hedge backwards was required, they were totally committed to it. I arrived after one chase to find the rabbit had made it to a hole, and got down, but with a hawk's talons buried in its rump. Most of the hawk was down the hole as well, and all that was stopping it getting dragged down completely was its outstretched wings. All that I could see was 2 wings and a bird's head. I had to reach past it and tease the whole assembly out.

When they grip with their talons (even just the glove) they lock-in by 'ratchet' tendons, so they can't actually release them unless a counter reflex is employed. After pulling the rabbit's neck, I then had to cover it with the game bag so the bird gradually forgot what it was holding onto. Then I had to chuck a titbit of meat a couple of feet away, and the sight of this was enough to get it to unlock, finally freeing the rabbit. The whole thing was very much 'nature, red in tooth and claw'. Thoroughly enjoyable though.

When they are training the birds, one of the first lessons they have to teach them is not to go after the long white 'rabbits' when they stick their heads above ground. 😜

Col
 

Paul_B

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
South Yorkshire
I had many a happy day ferreting, I also had many a long day as we had to dig them out as they decided to take a nap (before technology). having a father in law who made nets was a perk.
I used to breed meat rabbits and they were sent to France so they could sell them back to us as French rabbits were tastier than ours :ROFLMAO:
 

loxie

Well-known member
Points
28
Took myself on a little trip to a game dealers yesterday and bought 6 pheasants plus a kilo of diced venison for the staggering price of £19. Should get 10 good meals for two from that plus cold pheasant leftovers to make sandwich lunch for me half a dozen times.
We got 5p a bird for pheasants and get about £1.20 /kg for best quality neck shot Fallow or Roe Does. I could weep at how cheap meat of that quality is. We eat 4 or 5 deer a year in my house.
 

Dingbat

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
Switzerland
We got 5p a bird for pheasants and get about £1.20 /kg for best quality neck shot Fallow or Roe Does. I could weep at how cheap meat of that quality is. We eat 4 or 5 deer a year in my house.
I pay - well I don't because I'm not bonkers - 16 CHF/kg for the whole beast and 150 CHF/kg (ca 130 quid) for the back.
 

kevind62

Trust Member
Points
28
Location
Bayou La Batre, Alabama, USA
For those who might be wondering, this is private family owned land. Only myself of 3 of my cousins hunt it. None of the three turkey hunt so I have a complete run of the property all to myself. We have 640 acres. Plenty of social distance. ;)
 
Did anyone keep ferrets?
Ferreting rabbits was a popular sport around my area when I was a boy, I'd love to have a day out ferreting now that I'm older i remember it being fun, that's if rabbits ever do recover.
That aside I'd just like a pair to eat.

Al
Come out my way one evening, and you can choose the pair you want. Problem is, you will have to nail them with my air rifle!
Have a live population of around 30 or so that sit and watch as i Take me dogs out.
Dogs are trained not to chase the wee bunny wunnies, and we can get as close as 15 foot to them. Is unreal at times how close working labradors can get to them, and they do know they are safe! Same warren will disapear underground if an unknown dog appears!
regards
Bert
 

BobP

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Wiltshire
Come out my way one evening, and you can choose the pair you want. Problem is, you will have to nail them with my air rifle!
Have a live population of around 30 or so that sit and watch as i Take me dogs out.
Dogs are trained not to chase the wee bunny wunnies, and we can get as close as 15 foot to them. Is unreal at times how close working labradors can get to them, and they do know they are safe! Same warren will disapear underground if an unknown dog appears!
regards
Bert
The ones around the track where I walk at first light don't hang round when my spaniels appear! It's b*gger off blo*dy quick.
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
113
Location
Embra
For those who might be wondering, this is private family owned land. Only myself of 3 of my cousins hunt it. None of the three turkey hunt so I have a complete run of the property all to myself. We have 640 acres. Plenty of social distance. ;)
Look at all those cracking feathers! Worth a fortune these days! ;)
 

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