Eating of shot game

BobP

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Still smile when you say a cock pheasant weighs 6lbs! Thats an average brown hare, or a large blue one!
True enough. Many years ago some of the estates in this area would have hare shoots after the pheasant season. I went on a couple and was told that no matter what else, do not shoot a hare at the start of the drive because you'd have to carry it maybe half a mile across uneven ground. Worse still, shoot two!

The basic difference, aenoon, is that we don't have to carry 20 hares, but we often do have to carry 20 pheasants.
Nice one Bob , a brace of oven ready , properly free range birds , fed on quality feed , and having seen a minimum of 30 weeks wild ( even up to two years ) for a fiver . Puts the oven ready broiler chickens in the supermarkets( that have had 5 or 6 weeks of life before their crowded truck ride to a mechanised end ) truly in the shade .
personally, I breast pheasants rather than pluck , the rest goes to the badgers , foxes and buzzards .
i also have pheasant breasts in the freezer, but it's nice to have a roast bird from time to time. Next visit I'll get some diced venison which makes a superb casserole on a winter's day.
 

williegunn

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True enough. Many years ago some of the estates in this area would have hare shoots after the pheasant season. I went on a couple and was told that no matter what else, do not shoot a hare at the start of the drive because you'd have to carry it maybe half a mile across uneven ground. Worse still, shoot two!
Even more important on a white hare shoot as the ground is not just uneven but is covered in heather and steep.
It is important to get close to the centre of the sweep as you don't have so far to walk, or climb.
 

ejw

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If you cannot carry the load, don't shoot it !
I was brought up with the "standard" If you are not going to eat it, don't shoot it. The only exception was vermin, as it was part of the rental agreement.
We were self sufficient for our 1st 10 years of marriage (my grandfather was a market gardener for 30 years after retiring and my father and I shot) No food bills and bartering was a way of life.
Nowadays too many shoot for "fun".
 

Dingbat

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There is a wild season in the restaurants here, and in Germany,. Never seen fowl on the menu though. Hunting is restricted. As I understand it the season is open for chamois for two weeks and the meat has to be handed up. One is allowed to keep the liver (?) The deer shooting (high seats) is forester driven. I have no doubt that in both cases both the law and the animals are abused.
Buffalo? Elephant? Mate, you would need a bigger freezer -- a MUCH bigger freezer.
Nah - eats it raw our Willie does
 

haggstock

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An elephant it too much even after a day on the river.
Reminds me of the saying used at our project meetings when I was a wage slave , we often had to deliver something that looked impossible to design , build , and implement …
‘ How do you eat an elephant ? “ - “ A little bit at a time ! “
 

ohanzee

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If you cannot carry the load, don't shoot it !
I was brought up with the "standard" If you are not going to eat it, don't shoot it. The only exception was vermin, as it was part of the rental agreement.
We were self sufficient for our 1st 10 years of marriage (my grandfather was a market gardener for 30 years after retiring and my father and I shot) No food bills and bartering was a way of life.
Nowadays too many shoot for "fun".

A real hunter basically, none of this matters to shooting hobbyists, the motivation is to shoot not protect the resource.

I'm going to get some flack for saying that.
 
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anzac

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A real hunter basically, none of this matters to shooting hobbyists, the motivation is to shoot not protect the resource.

I'm going to get some flack for saying that.
We live in a changed world. People have changed. We, as we always have had, have those who do things simply for the experience and the 'thrill' of doing them -- shooting game for the 'thrill of the kill' included. We just have more of them today.

For the ethical shooter and hunter (and dare I say angler as well) creates an atmosphere of opposition.
 
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ohanzee

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We live in a changed world. People have changed. We, as we always have had, have those who do things simply for the experience and the 'thrill' of doing them -- shooting game for the 'thrill of the kill' included. We just have more of them today.

For the ethical shooter and hunter (and dare I say angler as well) creates an atmosphere of opposition.

I appreciate the thoughtful answer and not being shot down, I guess it is opposition, if you grow up hunting for food the hobbyists that kill things for fun is indefensible, it goes against everything real hunting is about, birds bred to shoot, beaters to drive them toward you, sorry, this is just not hunting, it's arranged killing for the day out, I just feel the need to make the distinction.
 
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williegunn

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I appreciate the thoughtful answer and not being shot down, I guess it is opposition, if you grow up hunting for food the hobbyists that kill things for fun is indefensible, it goes against everything real hunting is about, birds bred to shoot, beaters to drive them toward you, sorry, this is just not hunting, it's arranged killing for the day out, I just feel the need to make the distinction.
So how do stocked triploid rainbows sit with you, yes or no?
 

Vermontdrifter

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There is a wild season in the restaurants here, and in Germany,. Never seen fowl on the menu though. Hunting is restricted. As I understand it the season is open for chamois for two weeks and the meat has to be handed up. One is allowed to keep the liver (?) The deer shooting (high seats) is forester driven. I have no doubt that in both cases both the law and the animals are abused.

Nah - eats it raw our Willie does
I got my first hunting licence in Germany as my Father was based in Kaiserslautern. You shoot any big game you are allowed to keep the trophy plus the heart, lungs, liver and kidneys. You want the rest you pay by the kilo. Wound the animal from a high seat and if it can’t be found then the forester will guesstimate the weight and again you pay by the kilo. Ensures a lot of one shot kills and most German hunters will use a larger caliber than they would in the U.K. as a bit of insurance on not losing an animal.
 

anzac

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I grew up 'on the land'. My grandfather's generation was the last of a long line of life-long farmers. My dad and his brothers left the farm during the war and sought careers elsewhere when they came home, but they and my generation remained attached to the farm and to the land. Much of my youth was spent on the farm as well. Hunting and fishing were done for sustenance. We ate what we grew, raised, hunted or caught -- crops, fowl, livestock, game, and fish alike.

That said, I don't have a problem with catch and release, or with 'camera hunting' (stalking game and taking pictures instead of shooting it). I do however, have a problem with trophy fishing or hunting, which to me is wasteful and unethical.
 

ohanzee

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I grew up 'on the land'. My grandfather's generation was the last of a long line of life-long farmers. My dad and his brothers left the farm during the war and sought careers elsewhere when they came home, but they and my generation remained attached to the farm and to the land. Much of my youth was spent on the farm as well. Hunting and fishing were done for sustenance. We ate what we grew, raised, hunted or caught -- crops, fowl, livestock, game, and fish alike.

That said, I don't have a problem with catch and release, or with 'camera hunting' (stalking game and taking pictures instead of shooting it). I do however, have a problem with trophy fishing or hunting, which to me is wasteful and unethical.

Strangely aligned there in youth but it depends on how you define hunting, for me hunting is wild and for food, often in the rain and it wasn't always fun, standing completely silent for an hour in drizzling rain for a duck to land, a far cry from strolling across a grouse moor with someone flushing out reared birds just for you, what gets me is the suggestion that when under attack I should align myself with this, all this stuff about townies challenging country ways, it's thin rhetoric nonsense, none of us can afford to do the type of driven grouse shooting that is challenged, and the people doing it couldn't shoot their dinner without a team of keepers setting it up for them.

Sorry got onto a bit of a rant there :)
 
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ejw

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During my 50 odd years wildfowling, my local club had all the shooting rights and access was by boat. No walkers, no bait diggers, occasional bird watches (if they could get permission) No other disturbance factors. It was hard 2 - 8 miles of "Mud" walking plus 2 miles from the boat dock to get to the foreshore, wind, rain, sleet (never much snow) and freezing temperatures were the best. Early mornings, high tides, late nights.
Over this time (with bag limits, to control numbers taken, strictly enforced), duck populations in all species actually increased year on year until 2010 ish (from the Clubs beginnings in the 1930's). This was due to "Other" areas in the country being over developed and stripped of food, reduction of sheep grazing on the foreshore and abuse by the new ducks ? More numbers came in than the land could feed. By the end of November the land got grazed off ! Some species left Pintail, Widgeon moved inland, Mallard found other areas, Teal numbers plummeted.
At this time more members were "Game" shooting and where in the past it was done to add to the "Food store", it had now become the mainstay, with far less members "risking" the foreshore. I had left the committee, but had a large area still available on the inland march, but it was not the same. Food was cheaper to buy than shoot, so I no longer "Needed" to kill.
I still enjoy hunting, but now use a camera or a rod (mostly for catch and release).
Long live Tesco's
(the Duck, geese, pheasants, rabbits etc sent that message)
 

williegunn

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Strangely aligned there in youth but it depends on how you define hunting, for me hunting is wild and for food, often in the rain and it wasn't always fun, standing completely silent for an hour in drizzling rain for a duck to land, a far cry from strolling across a grouse moor with someone flushing out reared birds just for you, what gets me is the suggestion that when under attack I should align myself with this, all this stuff about townies challenging country ways, it's thin rhetoric nonsense, none of us can afford to do the type of driven grouse shooting that is challenged, and the people doing it couldn't shoot their dinner without a team of keepers setting it up for them.
Reared grouse, is there a big hatchery for this?
I take it you have shot driven grouse, as you seem to suggest it is easy!
 

BobP

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Strangely aligned there in youth but it depends on how you define hunting, for me hunting is wild and for food, often in the rain and it wasn't always fun, standing completely silent for an hour in drizzling rain for a duck to land, a far cry from strolling across a grouse moor with someone flushing out reared birds just for you, what gets me is the suggestion that when under attack I should align myself with this, all this stuff about townies challenging country ways, it's thin rhetoric nonsense, none of us can afford to do the type of driven grouse shooting that is challenged, and the people doing it couldn't shoot their dinner without a team of keepers setting it up for them.

Sorry got onto a bit of a rant there :)
Driven game shooting is worth a huge amount of money to the Exchequer each year. Can you afford to subsidise it? It provides large numbers of jobs across the country both full- and part-time. You happy to see all those people unemployed? Actually I suspect you don't care. Ban it and those birds, pheasants, partridges and grouse will disappear from the countryside and a lot more will go with it. Woods, hedgerows, all those cover strips that we see in shooting country and which provide food, shelter and nesting sites for a host of insects, birds and mammals will all go.

Scotland and to a lesser extent the north of England are the only places where Red Grouse survive and with man's help, thrive. You want to throw that away? Answer is probably "yes" because you don't care.
I grew up 'on the land'. My grandfather's generation was the last of a long line of life-long farmers. My dad and his brothers left the farm during the war and sought careers elsewhere when they came home, but they and my generation remained attached to the farm and to the land. Much of my youth was spent on the farm as well. Hunting and fishing were done for sustenance. We ate what we grew, raised, hunted or caught -- crops, fowl, livestock, game, and fish alike.

That said, I don't have a problem with catch and release, or with 'camera hunting' (stalking game and taking pictures instead of shooting it). I do however, have a problem with trophy fishing or hunting, which to me is wasteful and unethical.
anzac,

Like you I grew up shooting and fishing for the pot. Where we lived in Surrey there were no driven game shoots where pheasants were released and so to shoot a pheasant on the ground where we were able to go was a real red letter day. We'd maybe shoot two or three per year, so we wouldn't get fat on THAT sort of return. The rest of what we shot were mainly pigeons. Rabbits were off the menu once myxie got hold and THAT altered the eating habits of the nation to this day.

The rosy pink picture you paint of life on the farm just doesn't exist any more. I grew up on a fruit farm - mostly hard fruit; several varieties of apples, ditto of pears. Also a lot of soft fruit; strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries and peaches. I grazed my way through summer according to what was ripe at the time and thought nothing of it. To me it was normal. It wasn't until I left home that I discovered that it wasn't "normal" and that I had been lucky in the extreme.

I have no issues with driven game shooting partly because it gives me employment during the winter and partly because of the benefits it brings. Most of the beaters are men in their later years. They aren't down at the benefits office, they are out in the fresh air earning a few quid, enjoying the day and the company. For those that want it they can have a brace of pheasants for the asking and that is free food for three or four days. Driven game shooting protects the environment. Land has to earn its keep these days and if it isn't bringing income from game shooting it will bring it from intensive farming.

Like I said, the rosy pink days that you and I knew as youngsters have gone. It is a much harder and more commercial world.
 

ohanzee

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Reared grouse, is there a big hatchery for this?
I take it you have shot driven grouse, as you seem to suggest it is easy!

'reared birds' and 'driven grouse', but since you mention it, is there any other species that has an entire habitat managed for just them?

I didn't suggest driven grouse shooting is easy, I suggested that it's easier than real hunting.
 
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