Field Mouse Invasion

ohanzee

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Errmmmm no.
The mass culling of mountain hares in Scotland has been banned under a new ruling by Scottish parliament which gives the species protection under the Wildlife and Countryside Act.
The Scottish parliament has voted to extend legal protection of mountain hares and effectively ban mass killing of the species. On 17 June ,2020. MSPs voted to give the species year-round protection under the Wildlife and Countryside Act and prevent the killing or injuring of mountain hares unless a special licence is issued.
Mainly due to actual research, and not knee jerk conservationists.
2018 study in the Journal of Applied Ecology by the late Adam Watson found that the species had declined catastrophically compared to the 1950s

So please amend or retract your blanket statement.

Edited, can't have inaccurate statements, has the ban made a difference to the grouse population?
 

codyarrow

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In some areas they are in massive numbers, if you go up the A897 to Forsinard in the summer they are all over the road, not so many over the moor though.
Up and down the road all summer. It's my new route to go south. Never saw one. :)In 16 years up here seen 6 hares. Nothing to do with shooting.
 

ohanzee

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Up and down the road all summer. It's my new route to go south. Never saw one. :)In 16 years up here seen 6 hares. Nothing to do with shooting.

Nearing Auchentoul a couple of times I have had to almost stop to not drive over them, just as it gets dark seems to be the time, I thought they were rabbits but apparently hares, the look a bit more rabbity than normal hares.
I have only ever seen one on the moor there, it took off along the track east of the Forsinard hotel, a pretty spectacular rate over very lumpy ground, dark slate blue/grey sort of colour, impressive creature.
 

aenoon

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Nearing Auchentoul a couple of times I have had to almost stop to not drive over them, just as it gets dark seems to be the time, I thought they were rabbits but apparently hares, the look a bit more rabbity than normal hares.
I have only ever seen one on the moor there, it took off along the track east of the Forsinard hotel, a pretty spectacular rate over very lumpy ground, dark slate blue/grey sort of colour, impressive creature.
Yep, they are slightly smaller and more grey/blue than their imported cousins, the brown hare.
Indeed they used to be called the blue hare.
 

codyarrow

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Nearing Auchentoul a couple of times I have had to almost stop to not drive over them, just as it gets dark seems to be the time, I thought they were rabbits but apparently hares, the look a bit more rabbity than normal hares.
I have only ever seen one on the moor there, it took off along the track east of the Forsinard hotel, a pretty spectacular rate over very lumpy ground, dark slate blue/grey sort of colour, impressive creature.
Which would be pretty much all be RSPB ground. The hares do not gather traction here because they are lamped as soon as a pocket is found. A farmer I know got the numbers to 17 only to have them cleared out in a few nights.
 

williegunn

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Here's the humane answer for all the vicious mouse killers out there.

I liked the way he put the blanket in for the pet mouse so it didn't hurt itself. Then the wild ones had to take their chance.

If was going to humanely kill them and feed them to the beasts why wouldn't he use a kill trap in the first place?
 

ohanzee

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Obviously a Weegie trait, being unable to tell the difference between rabbits and hares.

I'm not 100% sure to this day, there are/were all over the road and fairly tame, grass verges covered in a very rabbit like behavior, and more rabbit coloured than the one previously described, I swore bind they were rabbits but during a discussion about grouse estates shooting them on the Wildfish forum I was assured their numbers were out of control and this was proof....you don't think....
 

williegunn

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I'm not 100% sure to this day, there are/were all over the road and fairly tame, grass verges covered in a very rabbit like behavior, and more rabbit coloured than the one previously described, I swore bind they were rabbits but during a discussion about grouse estates shooting them on the Wildfish forum I was assured their numbers were out of control and this was proof....you don't think....
Were any of them called Harvey?

And on a more serious note

Volunteers are wanted for the first on-the-ground national survey to shed light on the distribution and numbers of Scottish mountain hares. The survey, which is launched today and will carry on throughout 2021, is calling on hillwalkers, naturalists and other outdoor enthusiasts to record sightings of the charismatic animals as they are out and about. No previous experience of wildlife surveys is necessary to take part.

Do you think it is necessary to be able to tell a rabbit from a hare?
 
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Vintage Badger

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Were any of them called Harvey?

And on a more serious note

Volunteers are wanted for the first on-the-ground national survey to shed light on the distribution and numbers of Scottish mountain hares. The survey, which is launched today and will carry on throughout 2021, is calling on hillwalkers, naturalists and other outdoor enthusiasts to record sightings of the charismatic animals as they are out and about. No previous experience of wildlife surveys is necessary to take part.

Do you think it is necessary to be able to tell a rabbit from a hare?
I imagine they have identification info on their website for anyone who signs up to take part.
 

codyarrow

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I imagine they have identification info on their website for anyone who signs up to take part.
Not sure about that. The few I've come across are really quite small, and my perception is most folk believe hare's are large like they are further south?
More than once I've stood by walkers who were convinced the far away buzzard was an eagle because they wanted it to be.
 

Spider

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Hmmm.. Only one mouse caught.... But no sight or sound of them now, and no action on the traps. I didn't use poison, just the sonic gizmo and traps. Do you reckon I'm winning?
 

Vintage Badger

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Hmmm.. Only one mouse caught.... But no sight or sound of them now, and no action on the traps. I didn't use poison, just the sonic gizmo and traps. Do you reckon I'm winning?
It might have been just once mouse that found it's way indoors, in which case you might have won. I'd keep the traps set for at least a week to make sure though.
 

ohanzee

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Hoover a corner of the kitchen and carefully place half a raisin, if the raisin disappears and is replaced with a little turd, you have another little friend.
 

ohanzee

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Do you think it is necessary to be able to tell a rabbit from a hare?

Depends if you are counting on heather moorland or the roundabout next to a B&Q really.

I was driving in early evening, had I thought it would come up at a later date I'd have slowed and had a proper look, but I am reassured by experts that think the numbers should be controlled that they must have been mountain hares.
 

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