First ever rainbow from the river

antd

Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2013
Messages
21
I caught my first ever river rainbow on the Derbyshire Wye on Saturday gone past.First session fly fishing on a river,but I had a guide showing me the ropes.Very different from reservoir fishing as expected,but a lot of excitement.Managed to net this one lovely rainbow, but lost another big one and at least three of the other hook ups I had were brownies. Cannot wait for my next session on the river.

38218E04-C678-4088-AD5D-EFD39CB0EBCC.jpeg


,
 
G

GEK79

Guest
×
















×
I caught my first ever river rainbow on the Derbyshire Wye on Saturday gone past.First session fly fishing on a river,but I had a guide showing me the ropes.Very different from reservoir fishing as expected,but a lot of excitement.Managed to net this one lovely rainbow, but lost another big one and at least three of the other hook ups I had were brownies. Cannot wait for my next session on the river.

View attachment 28791

,
Gorgeous looking fish.. I'd never heard of a river rainbow.. Glad you enjoyed stay safe..
 

antd

Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2013
Messages
21
×
















Sorry for any confusion. I presumed that you would interpret my reference to “river rainbow” as a rainbow trout found and borne of the river as opposed to a stocked rainbow trout usually found in small stillwaters and reservoirs. Please note that I am aware that some stocked rainbow trout do indeed make their way to the river.
 
Last edited:
G

GEK79

Guest
I did understand your reference I had never heard of a rainbow River trout that was all something new to me..
 

SirHarryLewis

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
155
×


I caught one in Ireland on the suir. I believe he escaped from captivity though. There are a few rivers in the UK where this can happen also and you are instructed not to release them.













×

Gorgeous looking fish.. I'd never heard of a river rainbow.. Glad you enjoyed stay safe..
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,270
Location
Manchester
So they’re invasive species on every other river but not there?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Guessing you’d be against fishing in NZ, Patagonia, Chile etc? A vast amount of lochs in Scotland were once fishless but not lifeless, plenty of bucket stocking has happened over the last two centuries and the newts, frogs and any number aquatic invertebrates in these former fishless lochs now have to contend with a new apex predator. This stocking has created some prolific fisheries but they shouldn’t exist, would anyone really go to such lengths as to remove them all though?

The rainbows in the Wye aren’t going to spread further than they have done, the Derwent isn’t ideal habitat for them and they haven’t taken over the river in the previous 100 years. Even in the Wye they are bullied out of prime runs by the more territorial brownies so they occupy the faster more open water. They’re obviously non native but I’d say invasive is an overstatement as they’re not spreading harmfully through the river system.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
45,355
Guessing you’d be against fishing in NZ, Patagonia, Chile etc? A vast amount of lochs in Scotland were once fishless but not lifeless, plenty of bucket stocking has happened over the last two centuries and the newts, frogs and any number aquatic invertebrates in these former fishless lochs now have to contend with a new apex predator. This stocking has created some prolific fisheries but they shouldn’t exist, would anyone really go to such lengths as to remove them all though?

The rainbows in the Wye aren’t going to spread further than they have done, the Derwent isn’t ideal habitat for them and they haven’t taken over the river in the previous 100 years. Even in the Wye they are bullied out of prime runs by the more territorial brownies so they occupy the faster more open water. They’re obviously non native but I’d say invasive is an overstatement as they’re not spreading harmfully through the river system.

It certainly seems to be a stable, naturally controlled population, and that fish is a cracking advert for them, I would say the bucket fish of the Highlands is not comparable in that you can't carry a bucket that far and they are a local and indigenous species, rainbows don't occur here naturally.
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,270
Location
Manchester
It certainly seems to be a stable, naturally controlled population, and that fish is a cracking advert for them, I would say the bucket fish of the Highlands is not comparable in that you can't carry a bucket that far and they are a local and indigenous species, rainbows don't occur here naturally.
Leven fish were moved all over Scotland as well as the world, no doubt destroying genetically unique strains of brown trout. If a fish shouldn’t be there then it’s no more a native to that particular loch than a fish from across the pond. It’s all harmful to native species (Not just fish) hence why it’s outlawed now.

For sure the rainbows in the Wye affect the brown trout population as they will compete when feeding and also eat eggs from one another’s redds as the browns spawn in October and the Rainbows in Feb-April. I’m happy they exist in the U.K. in one place but agree with those who wouldn’t want them to colonise as they have done in the Western US. Same goes for my favourite species brookies, they only exist in very isolated places here so pose little threat of expanding their range.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
45,355
Leven fish were moved all over Scotland as well as the world, no doubt destroying genetically unique strains of brown trout. If a fish shouldn’t be there then it’s no more a native to that particular loch than a fish from across the pond. It’s all harmful to native species (Not just fish) hence why it’s outlawed now.

For sure the rainbows in the Wye affect the brown trout population as they will compete when feeding and also eat eggs from one another’s redds as the browns spawn in October and the Rainbows in Feb-April. I’m happy they exist in the U.K. in one place but agree with those who wouldn’t want them to colonise as they have done in the Western US. Same goes for my favourite species brookies, they only exist in very isolated places here so pose little threat of expanding their range.

I'd agree, we can't reverse what has been done, but we can evaluate it and see that the harm is minimal and not growing, and in that context appreciate that wild rainbow.
 

cgaines10

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
471
Location
Middlesbrough, UK
Guessing you’d be against fishing in NZ, Patagonia, Chile etc? A vast amount of lochs in Scotland were once fishless but not lifeless, plenty of bucket stocking has happened over the last two centuries and the newts, frogs and any number aquatic invertebrates in these former fishless lochs now have to contend with a new apex predator. This stocking has created some prolific fisheries but they shouldn’t exist, would anyone really go to such lengths as to remove them all though?

The rainbows in the Wye aren’t going to spread further than they have done, the Derwent isn’t ideal habitat for them and they haven’t taken over the river in the previous 100 years. Even in the Wye they are bullied out of prime runs by the more territorial brownies so they occupy the faster more open water. They’re obviously non native but I’d say invasive is an overstatement as they’re not spreading harmfully through the river system.

I suppose i'd have to look into it more detailed level & see what the affect has been over there before I cast judgement. However, I have looked into it in detail on our rivers so it's much easier to debate.

So where they only introduced a 100 years ago & nothings been added since? or has there been a continued effort to stock rainbows & possibly browns too? To aid easy fishing for club members.

I don't think we should have any stocked fish diploid or triploid in our rivers at all, we now know the adverse affects this can cause. Plus, the depletion to natural gene pool.

It's the EA that class them as Invasive due to their studies.
 

Latest posts

Top