First ever rainbow from the river

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
2,351
Location
South Northants
. . . I would say the bucket fish of the Highlands is not comparable in that you can't carry a bucket that far and they are a local and indigenous species, rainbows don't occur here naturally.

Many years ago, in conversation with Willie Morrison who used to run the Inchnadamph Hotel, he told me that trout were originally taken into the hill lochs above Assynt in containers on pony backs. Where there's a will, there's a way!
 

Tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
6,486
Many years ago, in conversation with Willie Morrison who used to run the Inchnadamph Hotel, he told me that trout were originally taken into the hill lochs above Assynt in containers on pony backs. Where there's a will, there's a way!

In the Great Lakes in the USA, they dropped them from aeroplanes. Flying fish.
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,271
Location
Manchester
×
I suppose i'd have to look into it more detailed level & see what the affect has been over there before I cast judgement. However, I have looked into it in detail on our rivers so it's much easier to debate.

So where they only introduced a 100 years ago & nothings been added since? or has there been a continued effort to stock rainbows & possibly browns too? To aid easy fishing for club members.

I don't think we should have any stocked fish diploid or triploid in our rivers at all, we now know the adverse affects this can cause. Plus, the depletion to natural gene pool.

It's the EA that class them as Invasive due to their studies.
There were first generation eyed ova brought in from California around the turn of the century and they were placed into a dam by the river Wye at Ashford, they developed into fingerlings here and they were intended for another destination but the dam broke during heavy rain and flooding and they escaped into the Wye. The Wye was very much like the rivers where they came from so they took to it very well and now you can find them in large numbers across it’s length.

It seems to be cyclical the way the rainbows peak and then drop off a bit, there are always plenty there but I’ve had way more than normal this year but next year who knows.

Absolute monsters are rare (I know where there is one but it’s impossible to reach with the no wading policy) but up to three pounds isn’t uncommon and in the 1-2lbs range there are tonnes. They’re also stunning specimens that have retained the colours of their yank ancestors. They’re completely self sufficient and the Haddon estate doesn’t stock fish of any kind and hasn’t done since the early 2000’s and even then it was brown trout they were stocking. Sadly the club upstream still stock so their members can have easy fishing.
A82E55C3-7C62-4318-BDC4-9EA3F3DEB197.jpeg


9BBD4C9D-E37D-4009-B35D-54B711744C47.jpeg
 

cgaines10

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
471
Location
Middlesbrough, UK
×

There were first generation eyed ova brought in from California around the turn of the century and they were placed into a dam by the river Wye at Ashford, they developed into fingerlings here and they were intended for another destination but the dam broke during heavy rain and flooding and they escaped into the Wye. The Wye was very much like the rivers where they came from so they took to it very well and now you can find them in large numbers across it’s length.

It seems to be cyclical the way the rainbows peak and then drop off a bit, there are always plenty there but I’ve had way more than normal this year but next year who knows.

Absolute monsters are rare (I know where there is one but it’s impossible to reach with the no wading policy) but up to three pounds isn’t uncommon and in the 1-2lbs range there are tonnes. They’re also stunning specimens that have retained the colours of their yank ancestors. They’re completely self sufficient and the Haddon estate doesn’t stock fish of any kind and hasn’t done since the early 2000’s and even then it was brown trout they were stocking. Sadly the club upstream still stock so their members can have easy fishing.


So there was stocking going on for along time & still is ongoing in some part. For me, I don't think they should be there along with the stocked browns. Especially as it's only for anglers gain & not the river system. That's what stillwaters are for. I suppose the damage is already done in some sense though, but i'd still want them removed if it was a river I fished.
 

sculpin_crusader

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 6, 2009
Messages
2,206
Location
Cambs
You’ve misunderstood Sean’s post. They were stocked over one hundred years ago and not stock again since. It is only browns that were up until recently were stocked into Haddon waters where as Cressbrook and Litton still stock browns.

There were a couple of Hertfordshire rivers that held self sustaining stocks of rainbow trout from historical stockings but have long since died out, I believe it was the Rivers Chess and Misbourne.

I agree with what you’re saying about rainbows not belonging in rivers but this being the only river with a self sustaining stock of wild rainbows it makes them very unique, I wouldn’t want them gone and would love the opportunity to fish a river like that with regularity for the variety if nothing else.
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,271
Location
Manchester
You’ve misunderstood Sean’s post. They were stocked over one hundred years ago and not stock again since. It is only browns that were up until recently were stocked into Haddon waters where as Cressbrook and Litton still stock browns.

There were a couple of Hertfordshire rivers that held self sustaining stocks of rainbow trout from historical stockings but have long since died out, I believe it was the Rivers Chess and Misbourne.

I agree with what you’re saying about rainbows not belonging in rivers but this being the only river with a self sustaining stock of wild rainbows it makes them very unique, I wouldn’t want them gone and would love the opportunity to fish a river like that with regularity for the variety if nothing else.
You've summed it up better than I did, they’re awesome fish and I value them in the same way I value the brownies and brookies Scottish lairds placed into remote lochs for the adventurous amongst us to enjoy! Early season they are beautiful as they are still in their darker spawning colours and they all have the characteristic orange tip to the dorsal. I’d go so far as to say they’re the best fighting fish in U.K. rivers. A one pound fish will strip a lot of line from your reel and anything over two pounds does what it wants whilst you hang on!
Early season fish below.

DE3677EF-0E6D-47F1-885A-2C40CAB16D7D.jpeg
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,271
Location
Manchester
Sean if my fishing day consisted of wild rainbows, brookies and grayling with a smattering of browns I’d be in heaven and wouldn’t ever want to leave.
There is some great fishing around the U.K. for people who seek out adventure rather than the popular places, I’ve yet to catch a river born Brookie but I have a solid lead for next season! It would have been this year but Covid screwed it up.
 

cgaines10

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
471
Location
Middlesbrough, UK
Got it, so they’ve never stocked rainbows since that incident only browns surprising that they lasted all that time then. I guess with added stocked browns the genetic pool of the wild fish will have been pushed out.

Each to their own I suppose. I couldn’t think of anything worse than pulling a rainbow from a river.

I can’t comment on their fight, but I’d put sea trout above them everyday of the week. Although I don’t catch 1lb sea trout


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,271
Location
Manchester
Got it, so they’ve never stocked rainbows since that incident only browns surprising that they lasted all that time then. I guess with added stocked browns the genetic pool of the wild fish will have been pushed out.

Each to their own I suppose. I couldn’t think of anything worse than pulling a rainbow from a river.

I can’t comment on their fight, but I’d put sea trout above them everyday of the week. Although I don’t catch 1lb sea trout


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I’ve had specimen sea trout from Currane and the rivers that feed it and a big wild bow fights harder pound for pound, I personally think the best fighting sea trout I’ve had are between 3-5lbs, the bigger ones use their weight more. Sadly Currane has been mismanaged and is a shadow of its former self so I haven’t caught a sea trout in five or more years. The rainbows are incredible fighters though and I wouldn’t judge them until you’ve seen one in the flesh. They add a lot of variety to my fishing.
 

cgaines10

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
471
Location
Middlesbrough, UK
I’ve had specimen sea trout from Currane and the rivers that feed it and a big wild bow fights harder pound for pound, I personally think the best fighting sea trout I’ve had are between 3-5lbs, the bigger ones use their weight more. Sadly Currane has been mismanaged and is a shadow of its former self so I haven’t caught a sea trout in five or more years. The rainbows are incredible fighters though and I wouldn’t judge them until you’ve seen one in the flesh. They add a lot of variety to my fishing.

I honestly couldn't disagree anymore 😨 Sea trout in my experience just blow them out the water. Maybe i'm lucky to fish one of them best rivers for them in the UK. As I know rivers elsewhere don't get the stamp of fish we do.
 

thetrouttickler

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2009
Messages
2,216
Location
West Sussex
The Wye rainbows are a curious oddity. I embrace them.

As soon as the last decade, and for many decades prior, fertile rainbows were tipped in to countless British rivers. There hasn't been an Armageddon.

If I only had a choice to catch wild browns or wild rainbow, it would be the latter for me.

Team Rainbow!


There is some great fishing around the U.K. for people who seek out adventure rather than the popular places, I’ve yet to catch a river born Brookie but I have a solid lead for next season! It would have been this year but Covid screwed it up.

Sean, if you want an intrepid fishing buddy for this trip... :)
 

glueman

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
4,434
Location
on the banks of the A5
You’ve misunderstood Sean’s post. They were stocked over one hundred years ago and not stock again since. It is only browns that were up until recently were stocked into Haddon waters where as Cressbrook and Litton still stock browns.

There were a couple of Hertfordshire rivers that held self sustaining stocks of rainbow trout from historical stockings but have long since died out, I believe it was the Rivers Chess and Misbourne.

I agree with what you’re saying about rainbows not belonging in rivers but this being the only river with a self sustaining stock of wild rainbows it makes them very unique, I wouldn’t want them gone and would love the opportunity to fish a river like that with regularity for the variety if nothing else.
I thought that C & L stocked rainbows in Monsall Head
 

sculpin_crusader

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 6, 2009
Messages
2,206
Location
Cambs
Sean would better placed placed to answer this, I thought they stocked browns and generally confined them to the day ticket section but I could be wrong.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
45,364
Many years ago, in conversation with Willie Morrison who used to run the Inchnadamph Hotel, he told me that trout were originally taken into the hill lochs above Assynt in containers on pony backs. Where there's a will, there's a way!

And since I typed that I did realise that although they might be indigenous and reasonably local here..we did stock them in various corners of the world where they were not:censored:
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,271
Location
Manchester
I honestly couldn't disagree anymore 😨 Sea trout in my experience just blow them out the water. Maybe i'm lucky to fish one of them best rivers for them in the UK. As I know rivers elsewhere don't get the stamp of fish we do.
I don’t see how you can disagree when you’ve never had a wild bow? They’re absolutely feral fighters compared to the flabby stocked fish in most reservoirs. I’ve had plenty of sea trout both accidental and targeted and although I’ll admit there’s not much between them, the wild rainbows are marginally better fighters in my experience.

Yeah Glueman is right about Cressbrook, they stock like mad with dye marked rainbows, brown and blues. It’s just a business up there and not a club. They cater towards people who like easy fishing and the members kick up a fuss whenever they mention reduced stocking. It’s weird because half the members are in the WTT?! Whenever they get washed down to our stretch they get knocked on the head and thrown up the bank.
 

Mrtrout

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
22,271
Location
England.
I fished the Derbyshire Wye four years ago on the Peacock stretch.
It was mayfly month, I caught 14 all Rainbows on Mayflies nothing else, not one brownie?
It felt a bit bizarre at first but they obviously co exist ok.
Only other place I’ve caught bows is Driffield Beck, but they are stocked each year and I think you’re meant to take them.
S.
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,271
Location
Manchester
The Wye brownies are awesome too, the river as a whole has become more and more prolific over the last twenty years since stocking was put to rest. These were caught within a week of each other along with plenty of a similar size and dozens of smaller browns.
CD917824-0C9D-45B0-9360-CA133922BA39.jpeg


70A6977F-6B14-4155-BA00-EDB384C721C7.jpeg


F01CA32D-B364-45D0-B2F2-B50EC2DC698B.jpeg
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
1,271
Location
Manchester
I’ve brought friends as guests from all over the U.K. and Ireland and all of them are shocked at the quality of the fishing, especially the dry fly. The rainbows are very free rising but your presentation has to be spot on, for sure that combined with the water clarity and no wading has made me adapt and improve my fishing techniques.
 
Top