First Glass Rod

pikersteve

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2014
Messages
73
Finally took delivery of my first glass rod Today and also my first 2 wt. It’s primarily for dry fly fishing in my little patch where short casts in tight spaces and roll casts are the norm. Small nymphs as well for the a range of species from Gudgeon to Chub. Most fish are small though obviously some lunkers lurk . Cannot wait to give it a go. Will take some getting used to with the different animal this is to what I’m used too. But the fish will be a lot more fun to play I should imagine. It’s the Orvis Superfine Glass in the 6ft 6 inch. Beautiful looking thing and I have teamed it up with the Battenkil one. Will post some pics later.👍
 

pikersteve

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2014
Messages
73

jaybeegee

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2017
Messages
1,019
Location
Yorkshire
That’s a nice looking rod. As a matter of interest; why would you go for a glass rod rather than carbon? I’m asking this because I’ve used a 6’6” #2 carbon on a very overgrown stream this season and broken it twice. I’m thinking about either glass or cane as being a more durable option.
B
 

Uncas

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
247
Location
Yorkshire
That’s a nice looking rod. As a matter of interest; why would you go for a glass rod rather than carbon? I’m asking this because I’ve used a 6’6” #2 carbon on a very overgrown stream this season and broken it twice. I’m thinking about either glass or cane as being a more durable option.
B
Much more reliable better action and very much like cane.
You have definitely answered your own question.
E-Glass would fit the bill for your stream.
Let use know how you get one.
 

pikersteve

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2014
Messages
73
×Thanks , I’ve heard great things about the rod and the full flex will be great for the delicate presentation in tight spots. Also with most of the Trout and other species being small it will add some fun . I have 3 wts and 4 In Carbon and just want to experience the 2 wt. They are supposed to be very durable so time will tell. I will only be using tiny dries most of the time
 

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,298
Location
Irleand
×Thanks , I’ve heard great things about the rod and the full flex will be great for the delicate presentation in tight spots. Also with most of the Trout and other species being small it will add some fun . I have 3 wts and 4 In Carbon and just want to experience the 2 wt. They are supposed to be very durable so time will tell. I will only be using tiny dries most of the time
Beautiful looking set up.. Will await an update..
Gary
 

webblade

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
114
Location
Kildare Ireland
That’s a nice looking rod. As a matter of interest; why would you go for a glass rod rather than carbon? I’m asking this because I’ve used a 6’6” #2 carbon on a very overgrown stream this season and broken it twice. I’m thinking about either glass or cane as being a more durable option.
B
I received my first glass rod 3 months ago just a cheap maxcatch 4wt. None of my other rods have seen the light of day since I love it. When I came home after first using it my wife asked me what it was like and I said to her if I was to describe it in one word it would be "alive". For next season I'm going to splash out on a more expensive glass rod. If you want to try glass for cheap the maxcatch is 70 quid.
 

Uncas

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
247
Location
Yorkshire
Webblade,

You have the right idea save up and treat yourself to a Steffen bros, or a McFarland, you will never regret it.
I have a vintage ST. Croix 6'6'' x 6 2pc but it will fish a DT 3/4/5/ WF6 they are so versatile and you can feel every thing right down in your hand.
I also have indulged myself for next year with a McFarland blank custom built.
 

webblade

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
114
Location
Kildare Ireland
Webblade,

You have the right idea save up and treat yourself to a Steffen bros, or a McFarland, you will never regret it.
I have a vintage ST. Croix 6'6'' x 6 2pc but it will fish a DT 3/4/5/ WF6 they are so versatile and you can feel every thing right down in your hand.
I also have indulged myself for next year with a McFarland blank custom built.
Thanks Uncas I will take a look at them.
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
955
Location
Manchester
Chris Barclay builds on McFarland blanks made to his specs. I have his 68 and 72 and they’re fantastic rods. I’m also getting a white McFarland 79 that Mike designed for Sandy Nelson up in Scotland, if you want a custom glass rod doing he’s your man, great craftsmanship and his rods are a lot less than what you’d pay for an American built rod on a similar blank. Mike reckons the 79 he designed for Sandy is the best glass blank he’s ever produced!
 

pikersteve

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2014
Messages
73
I’ve been looking at the Sandy Nelson rods Today. They look awesome. Good prices too. If I get on OK with the Orvis 2wt I will be adding a 3wt and 4 wt to my collection . Echo , Reddington Butterstick and Sandy Nelson along with Hardy Sirrus are what I’m reading up on now. Looking forward to using glass as already got a couple of cane rods which are great fun to fish with.
 

matt808

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2012
Messages
327
Second Sean's opinion on Sandy's rods.
To answer why a glass rod instead of carbon in a 6'6"?
From my limited experience this seems to be about the perfect length for glass. Even a cheap glass rod in this length will load better than a carbon rod, that's the main reason I use them.
I have a second hand 7' 3wt carbon rod built on a harrison blank, as I understand they are well respected blanks. This one is nice, but by nature of the material it will not load in the same way as a glass (and bamboo)? at close range. The difference is night and day.

The glass rods I have do feel nice with a fish on, but I don't know if they are so different from some carbon rods. To me the reason to use them is the loading and feedback when casting.

People will say 'if glass is so good, why do competition anglers stick with carbon'. How many competitions are held on little streams where you're casting a rod length?

I'm still not convinced glass is worth investing in over carbon for bigger rivers and stillwaters. The added weight which helps on small streams begins to be a hindrance on larger water. Some of the new hybrid glass/carbon rods sound like they could make great lake or loch rods, but I haven't tried any.
 

pikersteve

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2014
Messages
73
Thanks for these very informative posts guys. So much can be understood just reading through these posts. I’m a relative newcomer to the fly fishing world but that’s the only fishing I do 95 % of the time now. I am making up my arsenal of rods with the info gathered on here so a big thanks to you all. 👍
 

Hardrar

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
514
Second Sean's opinion on Sandy's rods.
To answer why a glass rod instead of carbon in a 6'6"?
From my limited experience this seems to be about the perfect length for glass. Even a cheap glass rod in this length will load better than a carbon rod, that's the main reason I use them.
I have a second hand 7' 3wt carbon rod built on a harrison blank, as I understand they are well respected blanks. This one is nice, but by nature of the material it will not load in the same way as a glass (and bamboo)? at close range. The difference is night and day.

The glass rods I have do feel nice with a fish on, but I don't know if they are so different from some carbon rods. To me the reason to use them is the loading and feedback when casting.

People will say 'if glass is so good, why do competition anglers stick with carbon'. How many competitions are held on little streams where you're casting a rod length?

I'm still not convinced glass is worth investing in over carbon for bigger rivers and stillwaters. The added weight which helps on small streams begins to be a hindrance on larger water. Some of the new hybrid glass/carbon rods sound like they could make great lake or loch rods, but I haven't tried any.
I started using Glass again last season, I learned on Glass many years ago and despite having dozens of carbon rods of all lengths and weights I’ve never been that happy with any and always found the steely feel of carbon quite Tiring. 45 years on modern S glass Rods have made all my Carbon rods redundant- they all feel poor and I do have some very expensive rods Loop Cross Hardy Wraith Sage One Scott Radian and Orvis various T and T Winston.
I can cast as far, with much less effort if I need, the rod does the work for you. They are slightly heavier on a scale, but much lighter in the hand with the lower swing weight ( leverage on your arm) I’ve Epic CTS and Echo glass and another Rawson custom on the way. I hardly ever drop any fish off now at all, the parabolic action being far better at playing fish with I find.
 
Last edited:

Hardrar

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
514
Hi
That's a really rod of I could buy one from every company I would
After over 50 years fly fishing, I have a few rods and well over 70 fly reels too! But they are an investment, many are worth several times what I paid originally.
 

markemark21

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 8, 2015
Messages
104
Location
Kent
I can imagine I have too a few little investments that I will hang on to. But 70 reels!! What a collection
×
 

stevel

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2006
Messages
2,246
Location
London
Hi
After over 50 years fly fishing, I have a few rods and well over 70 fly reels too! But they are an investment, many are worth several times what I paid originally.
Not many reels I can think of which appreciate greatly, I suppose early Hardys, some EVHs, Bogdans, and some quirky ones like Ari H. In general if you can get what you paid is doing well.
I knew this guy who I met on a destination trip. He openly admitted having a "disease" and had over 300 reels, mostly contemporary makes. When he bought them, he had to have the full set in all sizes.
In the end he sold his entire collection to the classic reel dealers at probably a fraction of the cost.
For me I couldn't have a nice reel sitting on a shelf just because I would reduce resale value if I used it or scratched it.
I used to do the reel accumulation thing, but I have a set of very nice bench reels (less than 10), all of which I use.
 
Top