Fisheries Lost

Zugbug

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Joined
Jul 21, 2007
Messages
199
I know I’m talking to the converted on this forum but having just posted on another thread mentioning apathy I got to thinking about the future of our sport, especially with the ageing demographic of fly fishers and the growth in all methods fisheries. As a club we’ve honoured every outing this season and haven’t found the need to cancel any boats however at most outings we’ve found several weekend boats being unused due to cancellations. If fisheries can’t make money at weekends then the future doesn’t look too rosy for them. A few of our outings this season have shown that some lochs are not as well stocked as previously which could cause them problems with bookings next season. The reduced stocking is an assumption from several visits and reports from others. Hopefully not but several clubs add or drop waters at their AGM and shortsightedness on the anglers may damage the viability of fisheries.
I note Rob Edmonds recent comments about Rutland, let’s hope that fly fishing survives there for years to come as we’ve had so many great trips to the big puddle.
Waters my club had fished regularly in the past that have sadly been lost to us include: Lindores, Loch Fitty, Butterstone Loch, Portmore, Piper Dam, Gartmorn Dam and Beecraigs. There are probably more but these are the ones that spring to mind. I’d hate for any more to go but the signs are there for all to see.
 

eddleston123

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Nov 3, 2012
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8,910
Location
Peebles, Scottish Borders
Maybe I'm wrong here, I'm sure I may be corrected.

One of the biggest expenses for a fishery is stocking it with fish - Anglers over the years seem to demand bigger and bigger fish, and also have an expectation (almost a right) to catch their limit, after paying a few quid. Probably the cheapest form of hunting by far.

If anglers could only get used to smaller fish - say around the 1lb mark, with the understanding that their ticket does not entitle them to automatically catch, then that may go some way towards making fisheries sustainable again.

This, off course is only one aspect and simply my own point of view.



Douglas
 

Zugbug

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Joined
Jul 21, 2007
Messages
199
I fully understand the cost of fish among other overheads, in many instances is the fish size not also as a result of cormorant?
I have no problem with fisheries increasing the cost of fishing but then I accept I may be in the minority.
×
 

raphael

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Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
328
Location
France, near Sancerre
A few thoughts:
- outdoor leisures such hunting and fishing are getting less popular for many reasons (looking somewhat old fashioned, competition with other activities, animalist activism...);
- on the other hand people want something more authentic, with a tough relationship with wilderness (and then stocked/put and take fisheries does not match);
- fly fishing is still regarded as somewhat elitist, expensive and difficult, despite it is may be the most funny ad overall efficient, and of course can be very simple (there that's your club to work on getting new recruits... I do not know how).

R
 

noel

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Joined
Aug 21, 2006
Messages
15,830
Location
billlingham
My water is Tunstall in Weardale and there is an assumption that it isn't stocked mainly put out by the so called anglers who want to sit on a seat box and watch a bung go under 40 times a day , and we have plenty of those types of fishery nearby . This year as we all know has been a bad one for obvious reasons but £170 March til November allowing you to fish everyday and take 1 for the pot on each visit surely must be good value for money .
 

ejw

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Joined
Feb 2, 2012
Messages
396
Location
Helsby, Cheshire
My local River Club (Rossett & Gresford Flyfishers) is full this season ! Had lots of interest during lockdown. It is a small river club. There is no extension to the Brown Trout Season even though we have an excellent head of Grayling. This is by the wish of the members. We are a small friendly club and encourage members to participate in bank work (helps with understanding river fishing). We provide FREE help for those who need it. Most years we run a "Riverday" for new, existing and potential members (not run this year because of Corvid).
It has been interesting over the past 8 - 10 years since we stopped "stocking" that we get better and more fish (due in main to habitat improvement). Also the members we get stay for longer (only stopping mainly for "Bigger" River fishing or due to age or infirmity). At £50 a year with no joining fee, it is comparable to a days fishing in a boat on a large reservoir, so a lot of members only fish a day or two a year !!
It may be this will be the fishing of the future ? The only real cost is rents ?
Just my thoughts on this disturbing trend .
 

uptomyknee_s

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Joined
Mar 17, 2010
Messages
902
Location
Hampshire
I remember a couple of small trout fisheries in my neck of the woods who have gone from trout to carp. I was talking to the owner of one of them and asked him why he had moved away from having a reasonably well supported trout lake to a coarse fishery. His response was simply economic. There was already a small but increasing population of roach. He then bought a number of carp of varying sizes including a couple of 20lbers.
He expanded on his rationale as Trout Fishermen pay for their ticket and take the fish. Carp anglers pay for their ticket and don't necessarily catch a big carp but if and when they do all they do is take a photograph and put it back. Unless he loses any of them through predation etc he does not have to restock. It works for him.
 

tenet

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Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
1,434
Maybe I'm wrong here, I'm sure I may be corrected.

One of the biggest expenses for a fishery is stocking it with fish - Anglers over the years seem to demand bigger and bigger fish, and also have an expectation (almost a right) to catch their limit, after paying a few quid. Probably the cheapest form of hunting by far.

If anglers could only get used to smaller fish - say around the 1lb mark, with the understanding that their ticket does not entitle them to automatically catch, then that may go some way towards making fisheries sustainable again.

This, off course is only one aspect and simply my own point of view.



Douglas
Most of the larger fisheries have to stock bigger fish due to the huge influx of Cormorants. A 1lb trout makes for a lovely hors d'oeuvre. Farmoor, Chew, Grafham, Rutland et al have to put up with flocks of hundreds of these killing machines which ought to be put on the general licence.
 

shropshire_lad

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Joined
May 31, 2017
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2,456
Location
Too far away from the wild places!
A few thoughts:
- outdoor leisures such hunting and fishing are getting less popular for many reasons (looking somewhat old fashioned, competition with other activities, animalist activism...);
- on the other hand people want something more authentic, with a tough relationship with wilderness (and then stocked/put and take fisheries does not match);
- fly fishing is still regarded as somewhat elitist, expensive and difficult, despite it is may be the most funny ad overall efficient, and of course can be very simple (there that's your club to work on getting new recruits... I do not know how).

R
Some interesting thoughts there and I recognise the second point in myself.

Having returned to the sport after a hiatus of 20 years or so, I have been surprised to find the stocked fisheries don't really appeal that much any more; large reservoirs where fish may naturalise may be an exception. However, I do long for the wilder places, Wales, Scotland, etc. Trouble is they are too far away for me at the moment.

So, I don't see myself fishing much for the foreseeable future. However, if we moved to somewhere where I could be on a wild river or lake within a few miles I doubt you would be able to stop me.
 

glueman

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Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
2,937
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on the banks of the A5
Not so much lost as priced out. Used to have a couple of days on the Peacock section of the Wye but at now £150 a day too expensive so lost to me
 

PaulD

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Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
1,248
Location
South Northants
A few thoughts:
- fly fishing is still regarded as somewhat elitist, expensive and difficult, despite it is may be the most funny ad overall efficient, and of course can be very simple (there that's your club to work on getting new recruits... I do not know how).
R
I can assure you that since I started fly fishing in 1966, fly fishing is far less elitist today than it ever has been. Yes, the sport is experiencing a bit of a 'slump' and numbers of small 'put & take' fisheries have or are closing, but there is far more readily available fishing at acceptable price than was present when I began. Compared to current wages, good, performing tackle too, is far cheaper ( apart from the premium brands) than it ever was.
 

thetrouttickler

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Joined
May 15, 2009
Messages
2,156
Location
West Sussex
My local River Club (Rossett & Gresford Flyfishers) is full this season ! Had lots of interest during lockdown. It is a small river club. There is no extension to the Brown Trout Season even though we have an excellent head of Grayling. This is by the wish of the members. We are a small friendly club and encourage members to participate in bank work (helps with understanding river fishing). We provide FREE help for those who need it. Most years we run a "Riverday" for new, existing and potential members (not run this year because of Corvid).
It has been interesting over the past 8 - 10 years since we stopped "stocking" that we get better and more fish (due in main to habitat improvement). Also the members we get stay for longer (only stopping mainly for "Bigger" River fishing or due to age or infirmity). At £50 a year with no joining fee, it is comparable to a days fishing in a boat on a large reservoir, so a lot of members only fish a day or two a year !!
It may be this will be the fishing of the future ? The only real cost is rents ?
Just my thoughts on this disturbing trend .
🤫 🤫 🤫 🤫🤫
 

Jason 70

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Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
250
Location
The congested SE
I think fly fishing is having a bit of a boom, it's not all about the old style game fishing ethos. I see youngsters out after Pike, Perch, Chub, Carp and all manner of silverfish alongside Trout on our more urban rivers. And general coarse angling rivers and to me, that should be embraced.

I've seen comments akin to "Fly fishing for Pike is not really fly fishing?" It may lack the finesse of casting a dry fly etc. But that pull from even a medium-size Pike is magic if you cast a fly line for whatever species then you are fly fishing even though you may be throwing a budgie on a #9.
 

mattfoz

Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2017
Messages
12
A particular water I used to fish was a very successful water once upon a time. Unfortunately in recent years is diminished due to piss poor management, not stocked often enough and when stocked not enough quantity. It's no longer a trout fishery.
 
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