Fishing from Grafham Dam Suspended and under threat !

Rob Edmunds

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I've just been informed that as of 29th November there will be "No Fishing" from Grafham Dam.

It seems a "walker" was caught in the face by an angler, so fishing will be suspended from the Dam - Anglian Water are asking for anglers comments by 20th December after which a statement will be made. ( I don't know if the person was actually hooked or just caught with the line)


It's unfortunate and there are signs up everywhere warning the public of the dangers of "Back casting" when crossing the Dam, so in my opinion they should take some responsibility but with the amount of runners, cyclists etc.... who just rush along the dam wall ( usually trying to beat their best time !) not caring about anything or anyone it was probably inevitable something like this would happen.

My worry is that this "incident" could have serious repercussions, firstly it could have easily happened anywhere on the bank at Grafham Water (or any of the other reservoirs for that matter) , does this mean that fishing Rutland Dam is under threat ?? or even bank fishing in general ?

I'm concerned as Anglian Water really don't care about anglers now........we are an inconvenience they would rather do without so it may be just the excuse they need.
 
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Wee Jimmy

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That's a pisser Rob, in my opinion the person who got smacked has been careless and is more at fault. Anglers and the ******** public are not a good mix and unfortunately its always the anglers who end up losing privileges in the aftermatch of these incidents.
 

JohnH

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It's long been necessary to keep your wits about you when bank fishing at Farmoor, specially on a nice day. There's quite heavy traffic of casual walkers, runners and bird watchers going round the lakes. Looking left and right before casting and/or timing the casts in lulls between the groups, plus a friendly "hello", seem to see most anglers through.
 

bonefishblues

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It's important to remember that walkers/cyclicatists/bird-botherers and other randoms do not understand angling any more than anglers understand their proclivities.

In particular they do not know when an angler is about to start to cast, but the one thing all parties tend to agree on is that hooking of any of the former by the latter is a bad thing.

Just because signs doesn't absolve the fisherman of responsibility, and the checks JohnH explains above should be done as a matter of course.
 

kingf000

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This could be a real issue. The water authority has a duty to safeguard anyone on their property. If the anglers cannot give that assurance, then the water authority will be bound to take action, as legally it is doubtful that just putting up warning notices is sufficient. I can see that what happened at Carsington is likely to happen here, fishing from boats only.
 

webblade

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I fish a lake with a lot of walkers. I always check before I start casting as the walker don't seem to understand how far my line can travel on the back cast. If I didn't check I'm sure I'd have caught someone with a fly by now.
 

Rob Edmunds

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I agree with everything said, we all need to respect others and take care when fishing.

But the biggest problem I've personally witnessed is runners and cyclists who are trying to beat their personal best time for a lap of Grafham .....they carry on regardless and dont care about anyone else, then have the cheek to blame you.

Cyclists I personally hate ....I mean the lycra wearing goons, not kids 9n bikes
 

PaulF1

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I agree with everything said, we all need to respect others and take care when fishing.

But the biggest problem I've personally witnessed is runners and cyclists who are trying to beat their personal best time for a lap of Grafham .....they carry on regardless and dont care about anyone else, then have the cheek to blame you.

Cyclists I personally hate ....I mean the lycra wearing goons, not kids 9n bikes
Maybe the cyclists are just returning the high level of regard you have for them? Imagine all those inconsiderate goons, casting hooks across a public footpath without even looking behind them? :oops::ROFLMAO:

Sorry, just getting the ball rolling for another "us v them thread." (y) (It's just a joke, honestly.)
 

Rob_N

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Hopefully there’ll be a solution. There are two paths behind Grafham dam - one just behind the top of the dam that most people use (where back casting is an issue) and one lower down the hill behind the dam. If Anglian Water made people use the second path there wouldn’t be an issue. There’s stuff on the Graham fly fishers Facebook group about making representations to Anglian Water.
 

anzac

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That's a pisser Rob, in my opinion the person who got smacked has been careless and is more at fault.
Exactly! It's called awareness and personal responsibility. It's part of being a mentally competent adult.

Unfortunately, we are surrounded by people who choose not to accept responsibility for their actions, and choose to blame others when things go wrong.
 

bonefishblues

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Exactly! It's called awareness and personal responsibility. It's part of being a mentally competent adult.

Unfortunately, we are surrounded by people who choose not to accept responsibility for their actions, and choose to blame others when things go wrong.
How does the layperson walking along a dam determine when it's safe to pass an angler?

The primary (not sole, note) responsibility lies with someone who is propelling a very sharp object at perhaps 60-70 mph in a location where it may damage others.
 

anzac

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How does the layperson walking along a dam determine when it's safe to pass an angler?

The primary (not sole, note) responsibility lies with someone who is propelling a very sharp object at perhaps 60-70 mph in a location where it may damage others.
Yes, we as anglers, be it fly or spin casting, have a responsibility to exercise appropriate care. That's simple commonsense. And then, there are people like my sister, who I told three times to not stand directly behind me while I was casting, chose to ignore me, and got hooked under the chin not two minutes later.

As for your question about how a layperson would know if it is safe to pass; the simple answer is to speak up and ask to pass. At the same time, even someone who has never held a rod in his or her life can understand that if the angler (whose focus may be on the water or the rod, and may not be aware of passers-by) is moving the rod, then there may be -- just may be -- a potential of being struck with the rod or the hook.
 

JoeOh

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Similar problems at Rutland, notably around Whitwell and the Harbour areas with people quietly approaching and maintaining an observation point behind the angler. I have got into the habit of turning to check the majority of my back-casts, but still some observers manage to materialise close to my back range. Usually they are polite, genuinely inquisitive but completely unaware of the risks to themselves. I cease casting until they have moved on.
A short while back, when the Walthamstow reservoir complex was opened to the general public, concerns were raised about the safety of walkers strolling by the two trout reservoirs. I do not know what the situation is now, but the response then by Thames Water was to ban fishing at weekends along both west banks of the two reservoirs.
Here at Rutland, there have been words exchanged between cyclists, and anglers in their cars, as I witnessed last weekend. There has also been reports of conflicts on the Peninsula, possibly because as happened last weekend, the driver was going very slowly observing likely fishing spots and the lycra-clad ones seemed to be on some sort of time-trial. However, most cyclists here at 'the water park' seem to enjoy themselves, possibly hiring the bicycles from the two rental outlets at the water.
I actually fished from the base of the Rutland dam this week and the low water level would make it almost impossible to hook a passerby. Would be different at normal water level though, and any adverse outcome at Grafham could be implemented at Rutland.
Due to it's steep and rocky terrain, the dam at Rutland is not that popular, but it can provide specimen fish to those willing to take the trouble.
The loss of angling access to the dam at Grafham would be tragic... we have been fishing from it for the past fifty or so years.
 
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PaulF1

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Yes, we as anglers, be it fly or spin casting, have a responsibility to exercise appropriate care. That's simple commonsense. And then, there are people like my sister, who I told three times to not stand directly behind me while I was casting, chose to ignore me, and got hooked under the chin not two minutes later.

As for your question about how a layperson would know if it is safe to pass; the simple answer is to speak up and ask to pass. At the same time, even someone who has never held a rod in his or her life can understand that if the angler (whose focus may be on the water or the rod, and may not be aware of passers-by) is moving the rod, then there may be -- just may be -- a potential of being struck with the rod or the hook.

But why would a layperson, walking along a proper footpath in a public area (I am imagining?) even expect the fisherman's line to come back 20 yards behind him? Most laypeople (?) imagine fishing to be casting some kind of peacock quill float 5 yards out in front of them into the water. They haven't bothered to look at the mechanics or distinction between fly casting, distance casting for carp or dead baiting for pike. It isn't within their sphere of interest, so why would they bother?
I'm fairly sure that the majority of people on here couldn't even begin to talk about boilie ingredients, and why not? Is it because they are all stupid? Or is it because they are not even slightly interested?
People, and I'm including us, are self centered and oblivious to the needs of others these days. Why expect anything else? We've only had 16 posts and it's already looking to be 100% cyclists fault!? :ROFLMAO:
If you (anyone) hook somebody behind you whilst fishing, if you're not in a private, enclosed area, it's your fault not theirs, regardless of how stupid they are. You brought the hook.
 

BobP

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It's long been necessary to keep your wits about you when bank fishing at Farmoor, specially on a nice day. There's quite heavy traffic of casual walkers, runners and bird watchers going round the lakes. Looking left and right before casting and/or timing the casts in lulls between the groups, plus a friendly "hello", seem to see most anglers through.
I echo John's comments above, though it does irk me somewhat when some tweety-birder stops right behind me to peer through his binoculars at one of the 2000 coots that infest the place.

Having said that I've had many a passing family stop to watch when I'm playing a fish & ask what sort of fish it is & how did I catch it.

It needs to be considered too, that the general public are much closer to anglers due to the roadway than at Grafham unless they are now running or walking along the sloping face of the dam.
 

bonefishblues

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Yes, we as anglers, be it fly or spin casting, have a responsibility to exercise appropriate care. That's simple commonsense. And then, there are people like my sister, who I told three times to not stand directly behind me while I was casting, chose to ignore me, and got hooked under the chin not two minutes later.

As for your question about how a layperson would know if it is safe to pass; the simple answer is to speak up and ask to pass. At the same time, even someone who has never held a rod in his or her life can understand that if the angler (whose focus may be on the water or the rod, and may not be aware of passers-by) is moving the rod, then there may be -- just may be -- a potential of being struck with the rod or the hook.
Of course, if an angler's actively casting someone would be silly to then pass behind, but I've talked about 'about to cast' - because that's where the main danger exists, I think.

Do current signs advise other users to speak to the angler to inform them the want to pass, I wonder? (And if not, how would that be received by anglers, I wonder, were it introduced)
 
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JayP

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Four people hit in the face this year according to the GWFFA newsletter that came out today, I'm surprised nothing has been done until now.

On the plus side I'm looking forward to fishing the dam from a boat
 
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