Fishing the Duo

Guest105

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As a novice to river fishing I have found that the duo works very well, (a balloon caddis and nymph).
But I'm having a problem that you might be able to help me with please.

The river I'm splashing about in has some nice lively runs to about a 3 foot deep, and I'm catching well in them.
But it also has some slower deeper pools, up to maybe 7 or 8 foot deep.
I'd like to try these as well, but getting the nymph down to that depth means either taking the dropper off and re tying it further up the leader or getting it to sink, which sort of defeats the duo style.
Then moving upstream into the shallower water means re tying again.
Add to that the tree trout etc.
I'm spending more time retying the leader/droppers than fishing.

Is there a solution to this? :confused:
 

wovennymph

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From my limited experience of fishing rivers, I usually have to adapt my fly set-up to suit the pools I am fishing. e.g. a different set-up and fly combination will be required depending on depth of pool etc.

I do not think one fly set-up would be able to cater for varying pool depth changes. A fly set up as duo to fishing shallows and glides would not be very efficient fishing deep pools where a team of heavy weighted nymphs would be best suited.

Hopefully some more experienced anglers would be able to give there inputt.

Kind Regards
WN
 

taterdu

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Personally, the joy of river fishing is the ever changing challenge. Each pool or riffle and often each fish will require some 'adjustment' to position, cast, leader etc.

Time spent sitting, watching and thinking is rarely wasted on a river.
 

danielp

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As a novice to river fishing I have found that the duo works very well, (a balloon caddis and nymph).
But I'm having a problem that you might be able to help me with please.

The river I'm splashing about in has some nice lively runs to about a 3 foot deep, and I'm catching well in them.
But it also has some slower deeper pools, up to maybe 7 or 8 foot deep.
I'd like to try these as well, but getting the nymph down to that depth means either taking the dropper off and re tying it further up the leader or getting it to sink, which sort of defeats the duo style.
Then moving upstream into the shallower water means re tying again.
Add to that the tree trout etc.
I'm spending more time retying the leader/droppers than fishing.

Is there a solution to this? :confused:

One option would be to setup with three droppers with the deepest being about 6-8 foot. In the deeper section fish the trio with the caddis on the top dropper. When you approach shallower water move the caddis to the middle dropper and leave the top dropper empty.
 

spadeadam

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Personally, the joy of river fishing is the ever changing challenge. Each pool or riffle and often each fish will require some 'adjustment' to position, cast, leader etc.

Time spent sitting, watching and thinking is rarely wasted on a river.

+1 Sound advice

My Mother used to say: less haste, more speed! (or fish in this case :thumbs:)
 

daniport

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You could tie the tippet of your nymph to the eye of the caddis.. this way every time you need to change its just a matter of changing the bottom tippet length not the total tippet and dropper.
 
T

troutbum67

Guest
Fluff why not skip the deep pools ,which may be best suited to dry fly ,or on some occasions high sticking ,but the takes are so gentle . Stick to more faster water the type you are doing well in ,the 1 foot to 3 foot type of water . Keep on the move covering all the fast riffles ,pockets and faster glides .
 
R

River Fly

Guest
One possibility is the sliding dry fly but only downside I can see is if a fish takes the dry.

Basically you slide two small pieces of rubber tube onto your tippet and then attach these to the dry fly hook, one behind the eye the other on the bend so that your tippet will be held against the hook.

You can now adust the depth of the nymph as you see fit.

Sent using Crapatalk
 

bill1

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One option would be to setup with three droppers with the deepest being about 6-8 foot. In the deeper section fish the trio with the caddis on the top dropper. When you approach shallower water move the caddis to the middle dropper and leave the top dropper empty.

Problem is that the constant changing of the bung fly quickly shortens the droppers. An alternative is to keep the dry on the top dropper, and the duo nymph on the middle dropper. When on the deeper water, add a nymph to the point. However, there is something deeply unsatisfactory when on the duo, having a couple of feet of loose tippet dragging around ( and the nymph inevitably winding itself around it.)

I would agree with Danny. And on the deep pools, if they're not up for dries why not drag a streamer through them:whistle:
 

delray

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St Albans, Herts
As a novice to river fishing I have found that the duo works very well, (a balloon caddis and nymph).
But I'm having a problem that you might be able to help me with please.

The river I'm splashing about in has some nice lively runs to about a 3 foot deep, and I'm catching well in them.
But it also has some slower deeper pools, up to maybe 7 or 8 foot deep.
I'd like to try these as well, but getting the nymph down to that depth means either taking the dropper off and re tying it further up the leader or getting it to sink, which sort of defeats the duo style.
Then moving upstream into the shallower water means re tying again.
Add to that the tree trout etc.
I'm spending more time retying the leader/droppers than fishing.

Is there a solution to this? :confused:

Hi FC,
This was discussed in the knot section last year. I've just had a quick look and i think this is the thread;

http://www.flyfishing.co.uk/fishing-knots/307095-adjustable-klink-dink-knot.html

Good luck.
Del.
 

rookstorm

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Mar 28, 2007
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On a river
Going off the topic of the duo you can miss out the dry and use the new zealand indicator yarn system you just slide the small piece of wool to whatever depth you need i fish it with one or two nymphs weighted or unweighted,superb stuff
New Zealand Strike Indicator Tool
 

luke troutstalker

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I think I'd be inclined to walk past the deep pools on the trip upstream, and fish them on the way back down with a more suitable setup.

The other thing to consider is that in super slow and deep water, you may be putting nymphs in there that are not typical to that type of water. I don't even know what you'd find in big slow holes.
 

plissken

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I'm probably missing something (/dons flame retardant underpants) but why not attach a new point fly to the bend of the hook on the original point nymph?
 

mikey67

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Jan 29, 2012
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ballon and caddis? ill be fishing the duo today but having lost my flybox the other day im short of ertain flies,ive not had time to tie much at the moment with my exams and that..i do though however have some balloon and caddis,i generally use these during an evening rise.how ae they as an indicator?
 

lubagh

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Two rods would be the best option here, possibly a team of heavy nymphs on the second rod.

No time wasted on leaders, etc once the water changes, adjust your tactics accordingly..

Failing that, tie in a second dropper on, to accommodate another nymph..
 

Guest105

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West Yorkshire
Thanks for the help guy's.
I think the pre made up leader is the way for me, those course fishing sponge spools with a leader on will clip to the spool holder on the vest nicely, then I can carry 3 or 4 made up and ready.
 

ben_tucka

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Leeds
or take the top dropper off on the slower pools so that the nymph on the bottom sinks down. keep constant contact in your fly line and the line tip can act as an indicator, if you have good contact with your fly you can often feel a take. also the top dropper can even be used to stick another wet fly on. its how upstream nymphing was done before the duo and works for me.

Although saying the previous that's when I'm being lazy. Normally I change my rig length for the depth of the river constantly. starting long and ending short. I will even change from fishing one side of the river to the other. but when you snag as many trees as me its not a big problem.

Ben.
 

JeffR

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Staffs
http://www.sportfish.co.uk/media/ca...8eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/2/7/2752.1_9.jpg Fluff these are a good way of fishing the duo , use 2 pre made nymph rigs ,one for shallow' fast, and pocket water , the other for deeper pools . It will be quick to change over the nymph rigs . I use a Tenkara spool or a bit of foam pipe lagging ,hope this helps out

You can do them same thing without using one of those klinks. Tie on your nymph section the American way (well Fred said it ages ago, so I always think of it as the American way!). Tie desired length of bottom section using a half blood around the leader ABOVE the dry fly, slide it down to butt up against the eye fly. If you want to fish a deeper nymph on a spare, longer section, just snip one off and tie on the other.

Saying that I would most likely either bypass the deep slow sections, or alternatively fish them properly with a straight nymph if nothing rising, depending how much time I had on the day. As others have said, changing is part of river fishing, its not like stillwater fishing when you can be chucking the same set up all day long. Carrying a second rod not really viable of you are fishing the river by wading up and in and out all day.
 

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