Flank marks on sea trout?

Cap'n Fishy

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The only real way forward with this is to make detailed close-ups of the damage, to see if it is restricted to one flank or both, and during the play of the fish, to note if there is any jerking or jinking that might be leader wrap in the fins.
The fact that some of us see very minor damage, and some see deep scarring shows we need to make notes on the type of damage at the time of capture, and record it with decent macro shots.
Without this it is all interesting conjecture.

For sure. It was only when I gradually became aware of taking photos of fish showing damage in the same place that I put the gallery together. I will go back to the originals and do some zooming in. No point in anyone trying to enlarge the shots in the OP, as they are all 1500 pixel down-sizes and you will not get any extra detail out of them buy trying to enlarge them. But the originals are mostly 31 megapixels, and I can do a bit of genuine zooming in on them at my end.

And I will certainly be looking out for this in future - including checking both sides of the fish.

Col
 

Rhithrogena

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Like I say, I am as certain as I can be that there was no leader involvement with the fish in 2. 😉 Need to get you out for a day on the dap! 😜 The damage in 1 and 3 is definitely old.
I would love that Col...
I think the general idea with c&r is to get 'em in as quick as possible, which may mean flank damage from the leader is more likely, because we pull 'em in harder, I guess? Or is it LESS likely because the landing time is shorter? 🤷
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I would love that Col...
I think the general idea with c&r is to get 'em in as quick as possible, which may mean flank damage from the leader is more likely, because we pull 'em in harder, I guess? Or is it LESS likely because the landing time is shorter? 🤷

I have never made any differential between how I play fish if it is C&R or I am going to chap them. If I am on fine, hi-tech nylon with dries, I will take it easy on a good fish, as I can't take liberties with the leader material. That is a possible contender for the fish getting wrapped in the leader during play. On the dap, I can use 12 lb Maxima with no worries, as the leader is in the air the whole time. There is only a few feet of leader at the end of the floss. When a fish is hooked, it can be played hard and brought in as quickly as feasible. You just don't get wrapping when dapping. I'm a poet and I don't know it! 😜
 

Cap'n Fishy

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aldot

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I agree that some marks might be caused by line scuff. Because of the angles involved I think there's more possibility of line scuff towards the rear of the flanks (as opposed to line wrap which could cause damage anywere)
 

Bobfly2

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An indicator would be marks on estuary caught seatrout. That means it is not to do with weirs or waterfalls or line wrap etc. etc.
Is it some feeding behaviour for shrimp in the sand, or sand rubbing to de-louse, or ... ?
 

loxie

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An indicator would be marks on estuary caught seatrout. That means it is not to do with weirs or waterfalls or line wrap etc. etc.
Is it some feeding behaviour for shrimp in the sand, or sand rubbing to de-louse, or ... ?
It's very clearly nothing to do with weirs or waterfalls as there aren't any on that system. Surely line wrap is as likely in the estuary as in the Loch? I have caught sea trout in the estuary, river and Loch on that system on many occasions over the last decade and have not noticed any difference. I have also caught sea trout in the next two rivers to the West and the estuaries and lower river of the next 3 to the East and I have caught grilse and salmon in all of those rivers and more on that coast. I have fished these rivers, lochs and estuaries regularly, often several weeks a year, at various times of year from Easter to Halloween since 1988. I would say that many of the OP's fish are pretty representative of the sort of predator damage you see on migratory fish across that entire area.
 

Rhithrogena

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RMS isn't bacteriological and only affects rainbow trout in freshwater in winter, I believe.
No it isn't. I wasn't suggesting this was the cause of the marks on Col's fish. Nor was I saying RSM IS bacterial...
Funnily enough,. Jimmy and I were catching one or two fish on our club water with signs of red mark syndrome just yesterday. But is that not all connected with farmed fish?
Usually, but not exclusively.
 

loxie

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Just out of interest I found an old photo from nearly 20 years ago. Those with a nervous disposition look away now!
061FE97A-1504-41DB-94F0-8FA728A8E9D1.jpeg



These were caught in Devon.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Classic leader marks on fresh fish?

The one on the far left... surely more than a scrape from a leader would inflict, no?

And, going back to the OP, fish 1 and 3 have got old wounds that are healing. Surely they must have been caused by more than a leader scrape? :unsure:

Col
 

loxie

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The one on the far left... surely more than a scrape from a leader would inflict, no?

And, going back to the OP, fish 1 and 3 have got old wounds that are healing. Surely they must have been caused by more than a leader scrape? :unsure:

Col
Heron I would say. On mine. Yes agree about 1 and 3 and the last one too on yours. It's the placement really on mine that caught my eye. I suspect any further forward and it would have been eaten. By something other than me I mean!
 

Rhithrogena

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The one on the far left... surely more than a scrape from a leader would inflict,
I don't think so - I think you can clearly see the thin curved damage that brief leader contact has caused on several of the fish. I think the first has just had the leader under tension pull right across the caudal area. I have an idea that slime removal and slight scale damage changes the way the light reflects, that's all. Possibly pressure is affecting the layer of guanine crystals that cause the silvery appearance, but this is pure conjecture - as we have said we can't tell just from a photo, but I think all of these are just damage to the scales/skin surface.
As someone who often has a large sensor camera with you, Col, please get more closeups of any funny marks on your fish. You might be able to shed more light on this.
 

original cormorant

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Just a bit of scepticism about leader damage. Are commercial coarse fisheries with 100% catch and release full of similarly "leader" marked fish?
 

Rhithrogena

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Just a bit of scepticism about leader damage. Are commercial coarse fisheries with 100% catch and release full of similarly "leader" marked fish?
No idea, but they aren't trout, which do get leader damage. Just examine the next few fish you catch, you will see what I mean. No way of telling if the damage in these pics is caused by the leader, but I reckon there's more than a good chance.
Next time I kill a trout (rarely), I will try and recreate this damage with my leader and see what happens and take some photos. The only way to know is to do some research. I agree I am speculating, but seems obvious to me.
 
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