Flank marks on sea trout?

LDO

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I've long suspected that the line can damage a fish far more than the hook. As it's usually caused by bringing in a fish too quickly it can of course conflict with trying not to tire the fish too much.
 

Rhithrogena

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I've long suspected that the line can damage a fish far more than the hook. As it's usually caused by bringing in a fish too quickly it can of course conflict with trying not to tire the fish too much.
Me too. But I suspect this damage is mostly fairly quickly recovered from, unlike, say, hook damage or keeping the fish out of water too long.
 

loxie

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IME leader damage is quite rare and pretty much always around the middle of the fish.
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Leader marks do occur but they are not what we are looking at in the OP.

I've had salmon wrapped up in leaders and spinning traces (including wire pike traces) downstream of me under great pressure that never had a mark on them. Those that have been marked have generally been further forward rather than between tail and dorsal.

Edit. What Loxie just said while I was posting.

Andy
 

aldot

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The more I look. . .

Screenshot_20210916-121754_Gallery.jpg
 

Elwyman

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Caught a few weeks ago from a small pool on a drought shrunken river. The fish didn't have many options for running out of the pool, so it kept trying to swim down to the bottom, so it's tail was nearly vertical and close to the leader, almost under the rod tip....3 parallel marks near the tail.
Took a size 14 Dunkeld on a B270 double hook.....outdated? I think not!

20210820_145615.jpg
 

aldot

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Yes, I think a lot of these flank marks are caused by leaders, worse with fresh run sea trout, their scale can come off in your hands, it doesn't take much. The leader could be very damaging with the weight of the fish keeping it taught
 

Cap'n Fishy

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IME leader damage is quite rare and pretty much always around the middle of the fish.

I would go with that. I would be aware of a fish having got wrapped up in the leader, and although it does happen occasionally, I have no recollection of it happening with any of the fish I photographed. And, as I already said, it just does not tend to happen when dapping.

Col
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Yes, I think a lot of these flank marks are caused by leaders, worse with fresh run sea trout, their scale can come off in your hands, it doesn't take much. The leader could be very damaging with the weight of the fish keeping it taught

Surely the mark in your post #66 was never the result of a leader? That is surely a wound that has healed?

Col
 

aldot

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Surely the mark in your post #66 was never the result of a leader? That is surely a wound that has healed?

Col
No, two separate unconnected posts.
Post #66 was a general post pointing out the more I look through my fishing pictures, the more I'm seeing flank damage. Quite common it seems.
 

bobmiddlepoint

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About twenty minutes ago I caught a large very fresh finnock not very far away from where the fish on the OP were caught. I was using salmon tackle so horsed it in in seconds with no leader wrapping. From adipose to tail it was completely descaled on one flank. The damage was fresh but not brand new (not this morning). It was simply predator damage of one sort or another.


Andy
 
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rockslider

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On my local river we dont have many browns because of the acidity of the water but we have large shoals of seatrout continuously running the river all season. One thing most of our trout do when fresh in is rub their flanks on the stones on the bottom of the river or flashing as we call it! Loads of our fresh trout also have these marks and the likelihood of them all having escaped nets or anglers lines would be pretty slim to none. So i presume they may be getting the marks after rubbing on the stones?
 

flounder

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From adipose to tail it was completely descaled on one flank. The damage was fresh but not brand new (not this morning). It was simply predator damage of one sort or another.
if as you say it is predator damage, these predators must be both rather poor at their job and downright starving to boot if the best they can do is remove some scales and not get any meat, it's a wonder these predators are still alive, most predator damage I have seen on fish have definite wounds easily seen fresh or healed
 

bobmiddlepoint

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I very much doubt fish the fish we see flashing are actually rubbing against the stones hard enough to dislodge scales. Having watched a lot of fish flashing I'm not convinced they even touch the riverbed. I've watched lots of fish at it this year in low water and most were not actually lying right on the bed.

if as you say it is predator damage, these predators must be both rather poor at their job and downright starving to boot if the best they can do is remove some scales and not get any meat, it's a wonder these predators are still alive, most predator damage I have seen on fish have definite wounds easily seen fresh or healed

Show me any predator that has a 100% strike rate?
Some of the examples in the OP clearly have healed wounds.

There is a huge range of predators here that could be having a pop, cormorants, sawbills, heron, otters, seal, gannets and the occasional osprey.

There is a group of predators that seems to be completely overlooked - marine fish. Sea trout will be hunting around kelp beds and rocks where there are thousands of pollack of all sizes. I've never heard of pollack taking sea trout but why would a 6lb pollack not have a stab at a finnock?


Andy
 

flounder

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I very much doubt fish the fish we see flashing are actually rubbing against the stones hard enough to dislodge scales. Having watched a lot of fish flashing I'm not convinced they even touch the riverbed. I've watched lots of fish at it this year in low water and most were not actually lying right on the bed.



Show me any predator that has a 100% strike rate?
Some of the examples in the OP clearly have healed wounds.

There is a huge range of predators here that could be having a pop, cormorants, sawbills, heron, otters, seal, gannets and the occasional osprey.

There is a group of predators that seems to be completely overlooked - marine fish. Sea trout will be hunting around kelp beds and rocks where there are thousands of pollack of all sizes. I've never heard of pollack taking sea trout but why would a 6lb pollack not have a stab at a finnock?


Andy
you are clutching at straws with some of your suggestions, there would not be a fish left if a seal took a liking for it, unless it did not have it's teeth in, birds tend to strike a lot further forward, pollack would swallow a smaller fish without it hardly touching the sides, the fish would not know anything about it, but some of the pictures show reasonably sized fish, most damage we see on sea fish are caused by the angler having to bully the fish thru rough type ground and the marks are on the front and on the broader part of the body, also rough weather can mark fish that are too close in and in too shallow water and get caught out but the marks tend to be further forward
 

loxie

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you are clutching at straws with some of your suggestions, there would not be a fish left if a seal took a liking for it, unless it did not have it's teeth in, birds tend to strike a lot further forward, pollack would swallow a smaller fish without it hardly touching the sides, the fish would not know anything about it, but some of the pictures show reasonably sized fish, most damage we see on sea fish are caused by the angler having to bully the fish thru rough type ground and the marks are on the front and on the broader part of the body, also rough weather can mark fish that are too close in and in too shallow water and get caught out but the marks tend to be further forward
You're very confident of this, have you much experience of predators?
 

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