Fly rod recommendations.

chase

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Dec 26, 2008
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bedford
Hi All,
I would really like some advice - I'm looking for a 9ft rod for River fishing that can "do it all " . 9ft 4 weight (could be 3 or 5 ) - Nymphs/Dry and occasional streamer(so will get the odd tap from a heavy fly )
Preferably matt finish and reasonably priced or reduced/end of line.
Medium/fast suits better(I think) so able to roll cast/flick the flies out.
As we all know the choice is endless - It will be used by myself and when either of my children have the occasional day with me so needs to be a bit forgiving for beginners (and me)
I had an original Greys GRXI that my daughter got on great with and was also my go to rod - unfortunately its been broken so many times there are no more replacement sections available .
Your thoughts advice much appreciated.
 

vital

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Nov 9, 2009
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South of England
Best vfm has to be Airflo's Delta Classic range, I've a #5/6 9' and a #3/4 8'. They're meant to be back-up rods, but I cannot find fault with either, honestly.
 

Tangled

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Dec 28, 2015
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You're describing a Greys GR60, except for the price. It's £100 cheaper. 9' #5 is the 'do it all' rod.
 

Lewis Chessman

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Mar 16, 2008
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Isle of Lewis
Hi, chase. There are so many good rods in the lower price range I wonder if you'd be better buying two rods rather than one, given your budget.
With respect to tangled, I don't know of a 'do it all' rod. Conditions dictate and vary. Also, you'll be less miffed if you whack a cheaper rod with a bead-head and it snaps if you have a spare in the back of the car. Also-also, you'll have rods for both your kids, not just one.
You might consider tangled's GR50 suggestion plus a 10 ft #2/3 wt for nymphing or a 10 ft #7/8 for reservoir/grilse fishing. Or something smaller if little rivers are your bag. Two rods will allow you to be more specialised, rather than searching for a Jack of all trades. For £250 you'll get a decent rod with (maybe) slightly better cork, finish and (possibly) hardware but not necessarily a better blank than you'll find on a £100 rod. That will likely have more filler in the cork, too much epoxy on the whippings and a less fancy reel seat - but the blank can be just as good, as can be the performance. Much of the extra £££ in a £250 rod goes into cosmetics and a fancier reel seat, not the stick itself. Surely better to have both your kids casting than one waiting for a turn?

Best of luck whatever you choose.
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Where I want to be
I had an original Greys GRXI that my daughter got on great with and was also my go to rod - unfortunately its been broken so many times there are no more replacement sections available .
Your thoughts advice much appreciated.

If you are a breaker of rods then you might as well go with one of the cheaper rods and as suggested get two.


Andy
 

easker1

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Nov 10, 2010
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Highlands
I have a Lefty Kreh TCRX 4pc 5wt 9ft, it's one of the best rods I have had, self built on the TFO blanks,
easker1
 

green man

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Dec 22, 2014
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Usually in Gloucestershire
You could easily afford two Redington Classic Trouts - say a 9ft 5 or 6wt and an 8ft 4wt. Then you're not compromised by only having a single rod. And if you continue to break rods as often as your GRXi, a spare will keep you fishing.
 

pati

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Nov 20, 2012
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852
If you really want a do it All rod from tiny dry fly to heavy Nymph, streamers and « duo/klink&dink » you probably need a 5wt if not a 6wt...

The line weight designation of the rod should be chosen by reference to the weight of the rig/flies you are casting at least as much as by reference to the size of the river
 

Hardrar

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Feb 6, 2011
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Excuse me if I’m a little biased, as I only use fast glass rods now, but as you suggested you need to be able to roll cast well? I assume there are trees etc that limit a back cast?
If so I would suggest you try a fast glass rod, as no carbon rod can roll cast like a fast glass can.
I rarely ever back cast now and Spey skagit and jump roll all the time- the rod does all the work and they are so much fun to cast with.
In the US fast glass rods are approaching similar sales to carbon now and many lines are being developed specifically for fast glass rods.
You will suffer far less drop offs and and break offs also and be able to fish with finer tippets.
A few often crop up on EBay.
See if you can try one?
Glass rods are less line weight and fly size specific, my Swifts, Echo’s and Rawsons are happy from size 28 midges to 4 streamers and lures and have no issues going up and down line sizes to suit, they are also much tougher and can take knocks from tungsten beads without issue.
 
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