Foam Buzzer

sabalos

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20210518_161721.jpg
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I like that idea. (y) Last couple of times on Menteith, the fish have been feeding on buzzers, and I just always fish dries, regardless...

So, they were ignoring any kind of 'normal' dry... Klinkhamers, Shipmans, crippled midge, Bob's Bits, etc. What finally got them was a suspender buzzer...

Black-susp_8547.jpg

... which hangs down from the surface film. But, hatching buzzers tend to lie flat against the surface... which I'm guessing your fly does? :unsure:

So, how are you forming the segmented and tapered effect from the foam?

Col
 

Tangled

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... which hangs down from the surface film.
I suspect that most of our buzzers have heads that point down, tails up, when not under tension - especially the epoxy jobs. Exactly the opposite of the naturals.

1621369028039.png
 

sabalos

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I like that idea. (y) Last couple of times on Menteith, the fish have been feeding on buzzers, and I just always fish dries, regardless...

So, they were ignoring any kind of 'normal' dry... Klinkhamers, Shipmans, crippled midge, Bob's Bits, etc. What finally got them was a suspender buzzer...

Black-susp_8547.jpg

... which hangs down from the surface film. But, hatching buzzers tend to lie flat against the surface... which I'm guessing your fly does? :unsure:

So, how are you forming the segmented and tapered effect from the foam?

Col
Glad you like it Col.
When they hatch they are pretty flat against the surface or a shallow U.
If it's calm the surface layer is hard to break through so they jab their tail and head in to the surface kind of gain leverage through the film.
To form the body get a ten longshank in vice. Tie on near the bend.
Cut a slightly tapered piece of foam and tie in the slim end with a slight overhang (dont use nano silk)
Then lift foam up and lay a couple of turns of silk along the shank.
Bring foam down and catch in with two turns. Then do three turns with foam out of the way then bring down and catch foam in again. You will see the segments forming. Continue till you get the length and segmentation you require.
Sound complicated but it's not. Just basically increase the turns on the bare hook to make larger segments.
When happy, carefully use a lighter to heat the foam. Only a tad though!
Then unwind the silk and remove your segmented body.
The segments will stay due to heat application.
Hope makes sense...
 

Tangled

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So why you banging on about epoxy buzzers... and tension...??? 🤪
Because I think we might have got some buzzer patterns a bit wrong.

My picture shows buzzers hanging head up, tail down, not quite breaking the surface tension of the water; your suspender buzzer mimics this and will take fish when they're going for buzzers right at the surface before hatching.

The implication is that the head of a buzzer is lighter than the tail but the epoxy jobs are top heavy, they'll dive head first if not under tension. Just pondering...
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Because I think we might have got some buzzer patterns a bit wrong.

My picture shows buzzers hanging head up, tail down, not quite breaking the surface tension of the water; your suspender buzzer mimics this and will take fish when they're going for buzzers right at the surface before hatching.

The implication is that the head of a buzzer is lighter than the tail but the epoxy jobs are top heavy, they'll dive head first if not under tension. Just pondering...

Epoxy buzzers sink. So, have nothing to do with dry fly fishing - where flies float.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Glad you like it Col.
When they hatch they are pretty flat against the surface or a shallow U.
If it's calm the surface layer is hard to break through so they jab their tail and head in to the surface kind of gain leverage through the film.
To form the body get a ten longshank in vice. Tie on near the bend.
Cut a slightly tapered piece of foam and tie in the slim end with a slight overhang (dont use nano silk)
Then lift foam up and lay a couple of turns of silk along the shank.
Bring foam down and catch in with two turns. Then do three turns with foam out of the way then bring down and catch foam in again. You will see the segments forming. Continue till you get the length and segmentation you require.
Sound complicated but it's not. Just basically increase the turns on the bare hook to make larger segments.
When happy, carefully use a lighter to heat the foam. Only a tad though!
Then unwind the silk and remove your segmented body.
The segments will stay due to heat application.
Hope makes sense...

Thanks - will give it a go. (y)
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Because I think we might have got some buzzer patterns a bit wrong.

My picture shows buzzers hanging head up, tail down, not quite breaking the surface tension of the water; your suspender buzzer mimics this and will take fish when they're going for buzzers right at the surface before hatching.

The implication is that the head of a buzzer is lighter than the tail but the epoxy jobs are top heavy, they'll dive head first if not under tension. Just pondering...

Stop confusing sinking flies with floating flies. Keep sinking flies out of this. You can have a floating fly lying flat along the surface, such as a Shipman's buzzer, or a crippled midge, or you can have a floating fly hanging down, such as a suspender buzzer, or a shuttlecock. There are in-betweens, such as Klinkhamers. The point of this was the OP was offering an alternative to the 'iceberg' profile of a suspender, where the entire fly is below the surface, but still floating. Rather than hanging vertically, the way a suspender does, the fly in the OP lies horizontally, which is what buzzers do as they hatch.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Lovely 😍
Just bought a spool of dapping line. Going to use some spider wire for backing?
Think how many more specimens you'd pull up if you had a segmented body. With a light shading of Pantone 7552 marker pen...🤔

I use micro braid for backing. About one rod length of floss is usually enough, but can go longer in very light breeze.



I've never bothered with close imitation - possibly because a lot of the time I am using different coloured daddies - it's the leggy movement dancing on the surface like Fred Astaire...

FredAstaire_4675.jpg

A claret 'daddy'...
Lomond-Sep12_5792.jpg


And sometimes I use flies that are imitating nothing, but just acting as a 'dancing lure'...
Hope2018_2761.jpg

But it's certainly an idea. After watching white sharks wise-up to a crude seal imitation and then attack a close-copy imitation, you never know. 😜 You could try experimenting with plain bodies and segmented bodies and see if the results differ.

My No. 1 tip for anyone taking up dapping is to keep the fly bone dry, so that is tumbles over the water like thistledown. Once it starts to get soggy, or a fish drowns it, it starts to drag in the surface and loses half its drawing power.

Col
 
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