footwear on stockingfoot waders

chrisjpainter

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I've just bought my first pair of stockingfoot waders. Is there anything specific I should be looking for in terms of what to wear over said stockingfeet (foots?)? They're Vision Ikon 2's, if that helps. I have kayaking boots and shoes that give great grip when walking, or would it be better to get some dedicated boots for them? Any advice welcome.
 

PaulD

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Very much depends where you intend wading and the conditions there. If you're going to be wading on rivers where there is bedrock then felt soled wading boots are the safest wading option.

Still waters or rivers with easily graded gravel bottoms or silt then cleated rubber soles, perhaps kayaking boots would be OK.
 

gmm243

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I see a lot of men on the loughs wearing crocs and the like.Not proper wading boots but this is purely boat fishing bar to get out for lunch or at the end of the day.I wear Daiwa wading boots which I can not fault.Had Greys Stratos before with a felt sole for use in the boat but once I went to the river they just fell apart.Got fed up trying to glue and fix the soles back on so binned them and bought the Daiwa.Have not looked back since although they are rubber soled which is not too kind to the fly line if you stand on it too often.
 

mrnotherone

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Whatever you buy, don't forget to get a size up from your usual. With socks and the neoprene feet your normal size won't fit.
 

wobbly face

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Depends on the wading. Kayaking boots or shoes might not be up for boulder strewn rivers. Be careful with felt, felt soles need to be stitched not just glued and no good when walking through wet mud. Rubber with studs are good in most conditions apart from making a crunch on gravel and such. Rubber alone can slippery on algae and mossy rocks/boulders depending on the rubber. Gummy rubber doesn't work, I've tried them. I've been using a pair of Bestard canyoneering boots and I'm well impressed, still slip and slide a bit but far better than any rubber soled wading boots I've had and better than my out going Vision Loikka gummy rubber with studs (3 seasons and they've passed it).
 

Lewis Chessman

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I bought a pair of Guideline Laxa wading boots from Uttings in mid-August and they've done me fine so far. £69 reduced from £175. I added Snowbee studs and haven't come a cropper yet, wearing them 6 days a week on the river until Oct.
As mrnotherone says, buy a size larger than your shoe size to allow for the neoprene sock. However, my I'm size 8 shoe and my Size 9 UK/Euro 43 Laxa boots feel a bit too large for me even with boot socks on.
Otherwise, not bad for the bucks - if they last.
 

running bear

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Real wading boots feel clumsy at first, the more you pay the more clumsy you feel! You soon come to appreciate the robustness and the ankle protection when wading boulder strewn rivers, and studded felt is as good as you’ve probably heard.
I’d a pair of cheapo boots first time, they lasted a couple of seasons. I’ve been in Simms the last 15 years (two pairs, one felt one rubber, both studded) and they are practically bullet proof. I wash and dry after every trip and the ankle pvc looks perished, but that’s cosmetic only. Both pairs still going strong, so in the long run very good value. Only changed the laces once!
The expensive studs are worth it if you get expensive boots. Cheap studs rust away.
 

pati

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If you can afford them: Patagonia foot tractor with aluminium bars, simply the best grip available. Otherwise the or is pro seemed excellent to me when I tried them...

If just for boat or easy chalk stream wading then decathlon!
 

delray

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Kayaking boots are gaining a following, most users saying what you mentioned, great grip. I don't think you'll ever get the perfect solution; steep muddy banks, rocky river bed, so many variables. Another way to go is cheap work boots with good studs screwed into the sole and holes drilled to allow water to drain when you leave the river.
By the way, re the sizing, it's huge odds against but if you get a pair of Scierra's, (my preferred choice, X Force) you either go one size down or your usual shoe size.
Good luck, but you may already own the answer.
 

speytime

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I used a pair of bison/snowbee neoprene boots, the boots themselves were fine but not made in the width to fit waders, you can buy x sizes over but they still pull at the seam tape of bootees getting your feet in them.

It's worth mentioning some wading boots can be deceiving when they're dry, you think they are light until you step in the water then realise you have a kilo+ extra on each foot.
It's less than ideal if you do a lot of walking, simms and Patagonia are the worst offenders I've had, simms headwaters in particular are 1.8kg in weight dry???

I'd need to take a body building course just to wear them 🤣

Al
 

LukeNZ

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Are you going to be walking much, perhaps even with a pack for a couple of days? If so the Simms boots Guide range of boots have great walking soles. I get a couple of solid years use out of each pair - walking many KM’s in and out of rivers. Currently got some G4’s, but if just fishing locally in the summer, just a pair of training/running shoes and shorts.
 

Lewis Chessman

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I used a pair of bison/snowbee neoprene boots, the boots themselves were fine but not made in the width to fit waders, you can buy x sizes over but they still pull at the seam tape of bootees getting your feet in them.

It's worth mentioning some wading boots can be deceiving when they're dry, you think they are light until you step in the water then realise you have a kilo+ extra on each foot.
It's less than ideal if you do a lot of walking, simms and Patagonia are the worst offenders I've had, simms headwaters in particular are 1.8kg in weight dry???

I'd need to take a body building course just to wear them 🤣

Al
You're dead right, Al. My heavy-duty Simms boots cost (my ex-bosses) a small fortune and weigh a ton. Sure, they've lasted a few seasons but I started getting knee problems this year so opted for the lighter Guideline boot above and they've been fine.
At their price I'd rather buy a new pair each season than need a couple of knee replacement ops next year!
Come to think of it, I'm saving the NHS good money here. Maybe the government should subsidise my footwear! ;)
 

ejw

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Had many pairs of wading boots from cheapo Shakespeare's (£45ish) to Orvis (£150ish after discount !) None have been perfect, none have lasted more than 2 seasons. Felt ones have been the worst, had to glue several, just to see out the season. Then I went to Bulgaria on holiday ? I picked up some "wading boots" for less than £20 ? They were canvas lace ups with a cleated sole. Worked very well, but were 1/2 a size small on my stocking foot waders. Intrigued by this type of boot I got my "Technical Advisor" (read Wife) to use her internet shopping expertise - She found some canvas lace up ankle boots the correct size for less than £12 delivered. Work well for my river, not good on mud though. I could add some "Ice Grips" if needed. The Bulgarian boots are still going 5 years later and the "On Line" ones have just done 1/2 a season. I do not look after my boots, just leave them to dry out in a shed. Last "real" wading boots fell to pieces 18 months ago. I have 3 stocking foot waders and 3 bootfoot ones and do a lot of fishing and guiding on my local river.
Yes I am tight, my village did missionary work in Scotland and Yorkshire, but they are still learning !
 

suzuki15hp

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I only boat fish these days, so I use kayak boots with my Redington waders.

I bought a pair of these over from the UK for the 2020 season and they're perfect.

They're not only comfortable, they don't slip on the lake stones and they're kind to the boat finish.

I buy them 2 sizes over my shoe size, and this one of the few outlets I could get #14.

I modified them by slitting down the grey ridge on both sides to just under the velcro strap closed position to make getting them on and off easier.

https://www.wetsuitoutlet.ie/crewsaver-phase-5mm-neoprene-wetsuit-boots-6913-p-10564.html

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speytime

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You're dead right, Al. My heavy-duty Simms boots cost (my ex-bosses) a small fortune and weigh a ton. Sure, they've lasted a few seasons but I started getting knee problems this year so opted for the lighter Guideline boot above and they've been fine.
At their price I'd rather buy a new pair each season than need a couple of knee replacement ops next year!
Come to think of it, I'm saving the NHS good money here. Maybe the government should subsidise my footwear! ;)
I've got a pair of guidline altas and I really like them, imo they're a brilliant mix of well made, light and comfy @ only 600grm I wear my hoppers for most of my fishing locally due to the weight (450g) but my altas come out when ankle support is needed or I'm unsure about the wading conditions or if there's little walking to be done.

Op I'd certainly be looking at Laxa wading boots, at £70 they're a steal.
 

chrisjpainter

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Reading, Berks
That's all been very helpful, thank you. I am slightly worried I might have made a bit of a purchase error in the waders. Do I need some specific ones for salt water, as that's what they'll almost be exclusively used for? But I will be moving around from rock to shingle (I'm an active angler!), so something with high quality grip would work best. My kayak shoes have a good vibram sole to them, but I'm a touch nervous I won't fit into them with my waders on - I'll have to wait for the postman to come to see that though. is my choice of waders okay for salt though?
 

pati

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That's all been very helpful, thank you. I am slightly worried I might have made a bit of a purchase error in the waders. Do I need some specific ones for salt water, as that's what they'll almost be exclusively used for? But I will be moving around from rock to shingle (I'm an active angler!), so something with high quality grip would work best. My kayak shoes have a good vibram sole to them, but I'm a touch nervous I won't fit into them with my waders on - I'll have to wait for the postman to come to see that though. is my choice of waders okay for salt though?

Patagonia with aluminium bars will give you the best grip on those treacherous rocks, but yes they are heavy, chunky and very very expensive... but in your environment it is a safety item so I would not neglect the quality of the boots
 

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