For your first cast of the season.

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Deleted member 90002

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Do you use the same fly each year?, or do you judge your surroundings and weather to make your choice..
Be interesting to see what approach we all use to make the choice..
Thanks
Gary.
 

aenoon

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Linlithgow, Scotland and anywhere i can wet a line
Do you use the same fly each year?, or do you judge your surroundings and weather to make your choice..
Be interesting to see what approach we all use to make the choice..
Thanks
Gary.
Experience of situation, coupled with the actual situation will determine chioce, however what worked last year, might not work this year!
Be aware, adapt as required!

Bert
 

Mrtrout

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England.
All depends on the day for me Gary, nice warm day a few flies about I’ll be looking for a rise or two before putting a dry on.
Might be a #18 Para Adams, or a CDC upwing who knows.
If it’s dull and still chilly which it usually is here in Cumbria on March 15th I’ll be thinking about an upstream nymph or a spider, searching the water.
Whatever it is I’ll just be enjoying the fact that the trout season has just opened and I’ve got six months to look forward to.
Wet nets mate.
S.
 
D

Deleted member 90002

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River or stillwater Gary? Matching the hatch comes into it's own on a river, sit & watch to see what's going on for a stillwater.
Well my first cast this year was with a small nymph had two takes.. Water was coloured and fast.
Its probably backwards for me to say but when I get to the lough I will always start with a bibio..
No scientific reason other than that was the first fly I used for my first cast with a fly rod many moons ago and I caught..
 

PaulD

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Some flies, particularly on still waters are very much 'go to' flies - bibio, black & peacock, black pennell, zulu etc - they are generally imitative of a host of natural food forms that the fish would expect to see and more often than not, if they are fished well, they will produce a response.

However, going fishing and simply tying on something's that worked before is a bit like fishing with a blindfold - your eyes and senses are probably your most valuable fishing equipment. Taking your time to look at the weather, the wind, its direction - not for the benefit of your casting - but for its influence on where the fish will be. Looking in the bankside vegetation to see what has hatched and come off the water or terrestrial insects that may be blown onto the water. Have a look in the shallows, any clues there . . . chironomid shucks etc being washed up, tadpoles at this time of year, on natural waters, shrimps in the shallows will often have the fish with their backs out of the water. 15 minutes careful observation when you arrive is far more valuable than 15 minutes of enthusiastic flogging!

However, I am reminded of a time when I spent 30 minutes, kneeling and crawling along the bank at Lyn Teifi early one March as I'd spotted fish moving in the shallows. I 'pursued' them patiently, casting gently, bringing the flies right past them . . . no response. Eventually, in desperation, I stood up and marched along the bank to where the movement was still happening . . . mating toads!
 
D

Deleted member 90002

Guest
Some flies, particularly on still waters are very much 'go to' flies - bibio, black & peacock, black pennell, zulu etc - they are generally imitative of a host of natural food forms that the fish would expect to see and more often than not, if they are fished well, they will produce a response.

However, going fishing and simply tying on something's that worked before is a bit like fishing with a blindfold - your eyes and senses are probably your most valuable fishing equipment. Taking your time to look at the weather, the wind, its direction - not for the benefit of your casting - but for its influence on where the fish will be. Looking in the bankside vegetation to see what has hatched and come off the water or terrestrial insects that may be blown onto the water. Have a look in the shallows, any clues there . . . chironomid shucks etc being washed up, tadpoles at this time of year, on natural waters, shrimps in the shallows will often have the fish with their backs out of the water. 15 minutes careful observation when you arrive is far more valuable than 15 minutes of enthusiastic flogging!

However, I am reminded of a time when I spent 30 minutes, kneeling and crawling along the bank at Lyn Teifi early one March as I'd spotted fish moving in the shallows. I 'pursued' them patiently, casting gently, bringing the flies right past them . . . no response. Eventually, in desperation, I stood up and marched along the bank to where the movement was still happening . . . mating toads!
Thanks Paul you know it's always a thing that I do before every trip to the Lough.. Early season I watch listen and see.. But first half hour or so will use the bibio.. Just tradition if I get a take or even a fish then happy days after that I will listen to my surroundings adjust and rea attatch something new..
Just a tradition for me pointless or not.. Makes me remember a memory from many many moons ago..
 

tierradelfuego

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As long as I don't have to use what I did last year because of the 1st lockdown delaying the season, I'll be happy - that was a Mohican Mayfly

For me it would be a Para Adams or Dro nymph usually but absolutely I'd be on the look out in the air, on the water and under the surface at a range of aspects to see what's going down.
 

wobbly face

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Not So Greater Manchester.
Last season (just before lockdown 1), new river, went with tried and trusted, duo with a Kite Imperial type parachute and grey nymph. Nothing to the para as nothing was rising. :rolleyes: For the res, black buzzer with pearl rib point and plain black buzzer on dropper.
I know it's black buzzer on the res. The rivers, could be a large dark olive hatch depending on weather and river conditions, always keep an eye out. 👁️
 

vital

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I've just completed yet another overhaul of my fly boxes and flies, reducing the collection by a net four boxes. The very first to be tied on my first trip will be dependent on the place, water and weather conditions, and whether I can see any signs of feeding fish, but be it a dry, nymph, lure, or a wet, I can guarantee it will be one of only a few of each type that I have great confidence in. I confess, however, that I still lug a vast armoury of patterns around with me every trip 'just in case'!
 
D

Deleted member 90002

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I've just completed yet another overhaul of my fly boxes and flies, reducing the collection by a net four boxes. The very first to be tied on my first trip will be dependent on the place, water and weather conditions, and whether I can see any signs of feeding fish, but be it a dry, nymph, lure, or a wet, I can guarantee it will be one of only a few of each type that I have great confidence in. I confess, however, that I still lug a vast armoury of patterns around with me every trip 'just in case'!
The just in case scenario.. Its an amazing thing. I always have a look and see if anything moving I was taught to check the margins to see if there has been a hatch of sorts..
But my first cast on the lough will be with a bibio.. Its just my thing..
But enjoying the thread it seems we all suffer the just in case...
Gary
 

boisker

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Devon
Most opening days I usually just fish a dry... and try and find one fish to the dry whatever the weather... but most years I’m off the back of a few months of just nymph fishing... after opening day I would then go back to whatever was most appropriate for the rest of the season.. especially March/April, it’s become a sort of tradition...
but this year is different, I haven’t fished since November... so, I’m not all ‘nymphed out’.... so this season I will choose whatever is best for the day... most likely nymphs ... but first cast will still have to be a dry:)
 

jaybeegee

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Sep 25, 2017
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Yorkshire
First day of the season if there is any surface activity at all I like to put a couple of spiders on, usually a partridge and orange and a waterhen bloa. No sign of the fish looking up and I’ll fish the deep pools with a pt or a black magic nymph sometimes under a klinkhammer.
B
 

micka

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Apr 12, 2010
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I only used about 10 different patterns throughout the season. I like to keep my fishing as simplified as possible.

It makes me wonder why I carry 6-8 fly boxes around with me with hundreds and hundreds of different flies. It's all because of the 'just in case' niggling thought that lurks in the back of my mind!



Douglas
I'm glad I'm not the only one Douglas, But the fly box I have round my neck on a mini lanyard is to keep me disciplined in having a much narrower choice - but I can't get out of the habit of carrying so many fly boxes in my back pack just like you.

Mick
 

JayP

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3,562
Location
St Neots, Cambs
Some flies, particularly on still waters are very much 'go to' flies - bibio, black & peacock, black pennell, zulu etc - they are generally imitative of a host of natural food forms that the fish would expect to see and more often than not, if they are fished well, they will produce a response.

However, going fishing and simply tying on something's that worked before is a bit like fishing with a blindfold - your eyes and senses are probably your most valuable fishing equipment. Taking your time to look at the weather, the wind, its direction - not for the benefit of your casting - but for its influence on where the fish will be. Looking in the bankside vegetation to see what has hatched and come off the water or terrestrial insects that may be blown onto the water. Have a look in the shallows, any clues there . . . chironomid shucks etc being washed up, tadpoles at this time of year, on natural waters, shrimps in the shallows will often have the fish with their backs out of the water. 15 minutes careful observation when you arrive is far more valuable than 15 minutes of enthusiastic flogging!

However, I am reminded of a time when I spent 30 minutes, kneeling and crawling along the bank at Lyn Teifi early one March as I'd spotted fish moving in the shallows. I 'pursued' them patiently, casting gently, bringing the flies right past them . . . no response. Eventually, in desperation, I stood up and marched along the bank to where the movement was still happening . . . mating toads!
Fk
 

rabmax

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Joined
Sep 11, 2009
Messages
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Location
Ayrshire
Can't overlook caddis larva early season.Chamois caddis or more recent years micro mop.Point fly usually when nymphing.Poly wing emergers for dry or duo/trio.
 

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