Freestyle classic

tj hooker

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I seen a lovely fly tied with a jungle cock veiled with cock hackles as an underwing the rest of the fly I tied as a means to try this out I think it gives a nice effect I had tried to finish with a herl head but could make no hand of it had to abandon that there’s always something to beat you tied at 3/0
832B3108-3222-4036-BCE5-FEF199F0A303.jpeg
 

baca157

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Excellent tying Grahame. The body on this fly is exceptional.

Glad to see you back at it.

Is that a John Saxton hook?

Cheers,
Sebastian
 

wingman

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Superb work Grahame and nothing wrong with a free style fly now and again and a bit of creativity to boot. Your flies are starting to remind me of a lot of Al Cohen's flies, very similar profile and look. The hook is quite short in the shank, not sure if it's a John Saxton but looks similar to Byron Bjerke's style of hooks going by the point and barb work but maybe not.
 
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arkle

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G, to get a herl head, the foundation has to be dead smooth, perfectly formed & very well waxed. I would use a tacky or semi-tacky wax for this. As you've more or less finished with most of the fly, a couple of coats of normal clear cellire before you start helps, you can then apply the wax directly to the head,

You should choose some of the narrowest herl you have, I would use herls from near the tip of a smaller, approx 12"/14" quill, where these herl's are about 3" or so in length + a glass of some distraction liquid !

Then wind it so the thicker flue forms this section before tying off etc. It may even slope backwards towards the wing, which is a great "brownie point getter.
 

tj hooker

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Thanks guys a perfect spot Sebastian it is a John saxton I got quite a few hooks off John and quite a range of styles my thinking was it Would get me tying a lot of different flys tying to suit the hooks This one was a 3/0 CDL and I have to be honest I don’t know what the cdl stands for I have so much to learn .Thanks Mark I’m well impressed with your comparison there I’ve had a look at Al Cohens flys There very nice maybe some day I’ll get there .As for the herl head John I was really cross I didn’t stick at it the head It was a nice shape for it I tied the herl forward and tried to wrap back I got it on also facing back it just didn’t look right Even thought of using the super glue in the end I decided I’d invested to much time to balls it up at the end so out came the varnish I’ll persevere the next time.
 

baca157

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I have a few of those hooks from John myself so that’s why I recognised it. CDL stands for Celebrated Limerick Bend, I think.

Cheers,
Sebastian
 

arkle

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Graham, superglue does not penetrate far enough into the head as it dries to quickly. The same applies for SH. We discovered this when stripping heads off failed tyings to re-use the hooks, by far the most difficult head to razor-blade off were those with cellire.
 

wingman

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CDL stands for Celebrated Dublin Limerick Grahame as Sebastian mentioned but left out what the D stands for which I'm sure he knows anyway. The Limerick refers to the type of bend of the hook and it could be a Kirby bend, Kendal bend, Carlisle bend, Aberdeen bend or Limerick bend as here. Usually named after the places where the bend was originated by the hook makers of the time and the former three mentioned above are places a stones throw away from where I live funnily enough. The point is a Dublin point which signifies a nice curve (not concave) to the point from the end of the barb dipping down at the very end of the point which gives it a more graceful look although I think it also has some kind of function when piercing the flesh of the fish. A Harrison Hollow Point has a more concave point from end of barb to end of point hence the name and is one of my favourite hook profiles. As hook making progressed through time the length of the barb generally decreased thankfully. Here'a a pic of a Hollow Point I tied a McIntyre on a few year back and you can see how the top edge of the point looks concave.

 
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