Gardening, some advise requested.

Oldbones

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For anyone interested in this best thing since sliced bread , this is the American version. Not as sharp a point as the Irish and with treads. The Irish makes better dome shaped holes. This one you can really cut down hard.
For digging or shovelling they don’t half save your back. View attachment 44248
Right is my American spade, middle the Japanese gold spade ( a little digging machine) the blade shape penetrates really well especially when there’s roots and a great planting tool.
And left the ladies fork for repairing footmarks on the border( not for heavy work!).essential for good soil
My dad had a spade very similar to your Japanese gold, but the handle was made of wood, the blade was the same shape but a bit shorter. This was about 40 years ago, I wonder where it is now, we will never know.
 

Oldbones

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New question, I did find some worms while digging my wee bit of veg patch, but very few.
So would I have to introduce some, I know how to catch them, its very easy, I have a tool, home made by myself.
Its a copy of a worm getter, I use it for course fishing, brilliant piece of kit.
Or will worms arrive on their own, can I have too much.
My mind is running in overdrive with all of this.
 

Whinging pom

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My dad had a spade very similar to your Japanese gold, but the handle was made of wood, the blade was the same shape but a bit shorter. This was about 40 years ago, I wonder where it is now, we will never know.
Elwell ( that name again) supplied those spades for land rovers during the Second World War and continued after for quite a while . I have one with the original handle . My assistant added a long handle to his and made a great version of an Irish spade. I’ve tried to liberate it from him but he’s very possessive of it.
 
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Whinging pom

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New question, I did find some worms while digging my wee bit of veg patch, but very few.
So would I have to introduce some, I know how to catch them, its very easy, I have a tool, home made by myself.
Its a copy of a worm getter, I use it for course fishing, brilliant piece of kit.
Or will worms arrive on their own, can I have too much.
My mind is running in overdrive with all of this.
The worms will arrive as the stuff they need to munch improves, namely humus ( fine organic matter) once your composting and putting that on the soil your population will quickly improve. Also now you’ve fluffed it up it will be more of a desirable residence for them and you’ll probably find them migrating up or across from the lawn.The lug worms are deep workers and wil come up, the brandlings really need humus and will breed like hell once conditions are right
 

Paul_B

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New question, I did find some worms while digging my wee bit of veg patch, but very few.
So would I have to introduce some, I know how to catch them, its very easy, I have a tool, home made by myself.
Its a copy of a worm getter, I use it for course fishing, brilliant piece of kit.
Or will worms arrive on their own, can I have too much.
My mind is running in overdrive with all of this.

Worms will be deep due to all the dry weather, despite the rain my soil is still on the dry side
 

ohanzee

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My mind is running in overdrive with all of this.

In your fathers day all this stuff was just commonly know knowledge shared over the garden fence, they all did it and took pride in it, I reckon it's worth catching a bit of that back up.
 

Oldbones

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Spot on, my dad had a few friends who also had a garden, all survivors of WWII and all very well respected men in the village.
They often swapped plants and knowledge with each other.
My dad watered his plants very sparingly, hardly ever, while others were out with a hose each day. My dad waited for the rain to do the watering, and he always had a good crop.
My wife tells me to stop getting worked up and just do what my dad did and it will be absolutely fine. I just hope I can even come close to him with my garden.
 

ohanzee

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Spot on, my dad had a few friends who also had a garden, all survivors of WWII and all very well respected men in the village.
They often swapped plants and knowledge with each other.
My dad watered his plants very sparingly, hardly ever, while others were out with a hose each day. My dad waited for the rain to do the watering, and he always had a good crop.
My wife tells me to stop getting worked up and just do what my dad did and it will be absolutely fine. I just hope I can even come close to him with my garden.

I think it's easy for us to forget that his skill was learned over a lifetime, passed on by generations and was a post war culture all over the UK, I grew up with a kitchen table that was the center of everything, veg was grown just feet away, hares and pheasants hung in a cupboard just round the corner, and it was all prepped, cooked and eaten on and around that table, bread sat in the middle and the butter never went to a fridge, there wasn't one but it was eaten before it would have needed to anyway, you ate whatever was in the garden or shot the previous weekend, everything left over went in soup, it was a pretty efficient system looking back.

This was just how it was, now they would call it 'self sufficient', it was but the whole family had to do their bit, even the community, I remember all the kids going round the doors to collect milk that was going off, this went to an old woman that made pancakes, the phone would ring when the first batch was ready and the kids went with a plate and a dish cloth to cover them, this happened about once a fortnight, and in return that woman could call on anyone for anything when needed, everything seemed to be interconnected in a useful way, kids that had nothing to do were sent to help people do something..think I'm getting a bit carried away here :)

Maybe the moral of the story is if we are to face a more energy efficient future we could learn a few things from the post war generations, a carrot from the garden has zero carbon footprint and doesn't come in plastic.
 

Whinging pom

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My dad watered his plants very sparingly, hardly ever, while others were out with a hose each day. My dad waited for the rain to do the watering, and he always had a good crop.
One of my favourite little books is a little hardback wordy publication with very few illustrations from I think around the 1930’s
It’s called Gardening For Schoolchildren.
In it there is description of the major tools and their use and some essential techniques. At least a quarter of the book is given over to the Dutch hoe , it’s usage and an explanation of how it reduces water loss from the soil.

when I first arrived at college my first practical lesson was to bring our personal tools that we were required to supply our selves. Secateurs, grafting and pruning knifes. Trowel and hand fork the lesson was how to maintain and sharpen them , we were also fitted up with our Dutch hoes! My favourite is back in Northants ,it’s blade is about 8inch across of thin solid steel forks . The handle is a bit over 5’, if I stand on level ground with my fist pushed into my breast bone thumb first holding the end of the handle, then the blade touching the floor is a exactly parallel. And fitting the hoe means bending the plane of the blade to achieve that. So in your normal hoeing action it works parallel with the soil level .


If one thing apart from people treading over beds and not forking back up drives me to despair it is hearing the words “ I water a little and often”!
it is the most damaging thing you can do to plants and soil.
If we set up irrigation’s for new borders, the very least interval i set is every 48 hours if there’s lots of wind . Normally I go for a good soak every 4 days.
Never ever just wander round with a hose giving everything a quick spray and think it’s of any benefit at all !

bellow is not a Dutch it’s an abomination
4B746149-708E-4CFB-BA89-098DA2CFB55C.jpeg
 

Paul_B

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Nice photo, from the days when quality engineers bricks were cheaper than mortar, the days when cow and pig muck was freely available and the soil had plenty of humus to hold water.

As I said previously I use a stowe hoe for weeding, this has a 7ft carbon handle so I can weed without walking on the soil


DSC_0560 2.JPG
 

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