Gear for Caithness

fatfifer

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Apr 8, 2017
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Glenrothes, Fife
Hi All,
I am new to all this at the ripe old age of 61. I've only had three days so far on small stillwaters and caught my first trout today. I have a 10' 8wt rod and an old greys reel with interchangeable spools. I have a floating, an intermediate and a sinking line and three spare spools.
I'll be up in Caithness for a few days in June. Will my rod and lines be ok for the lochs there? If not presumably a lighter road and matching lines but can I still use the same reel?
I could stretch to a couple of hundred quid if I needed to/ knew what to get.
 

eddleston123

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Nov 3, 2012
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Peebles, Scottish Borders
Yes, your outfit will catch fish, but an 8# set up, is a bit overkill for relatively small wild brownies.

You do not say, if you will be fishing from bank or boat, but if you are fishing from the bank, then a 9' 5# outfit would, imo be more than adequate.

Your present reel will be fine.



Douglas
 

fatfifer

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Apr 8, 2017
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Location
Glenrothes, Fife
Many thanks for the reply. I will be fishing from the bank - this time anyway. I thought I might need a lighter set up but just wasn't sure how light to go. I have been in Caithness before (not fishing) and I'm aware that a light breeze to the locals would be a howling gale to most of us.
 

punt12

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Jan 13, 2017
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Durham
John Norris are selling a Shakespeare omni kits for £29.99 it includes line rod and reel. It's a complete bargain.
 

codyarrow

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Which Lochs are you intending to fish? Or where are you staying?
I personally would'nt go down to a 5wt rod, I tried it and the relationship between line weight and wind is dis agreeable on too many occasions. I'd go for a 10ft 6/7wt rod which will probably be more useful to you when you go back home. Floating line is all you need.
Some of the Lochs are easier than others, and some you need to be careful if you're wading.
 

nigel67

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May 28, 2012
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East Yorkshire
Yes, your outfit will catch fish, but an 8# set up, is a bit overkill for relatively small wild brownies.

You do not say, if you will be fishing from bank or boat, but if you are fishing from the bank, then a 9' 5# outfit would, imo be more than adequate.

Your present reel will be fine.



Douglas

What he says :thumbs:
 

shpeil

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Oct 7, 2009
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Like they say, you don't need a lighter rod but it will be more enjoyable on small fish. I'd also go for a 9ft 5wt for the bank but I'd suggest you take the 8wt in the boot of the car in case the wind gets up.
 

Fishtales

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Central Scotland
I would take the rod you have, I use a 10` #7 for all my fishing :) Why change rods going on holiday and have to get used to a new rod at the same time as getting used to different conditions and waters. Once you are back home is the time to think about the rod that might have made your fishing more enjoyable, or not, and buy accordingly; you will then have all the time in the world to get used to it before your next trip.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Embra
Which Lochs are you intending to fish? Or where are you staying?
I personally would'nt go down to a 5wt rod, I tried it and the relationship between line weight and wind is dis agreeable on too many occasions. I'd go for a 10ft 6/7wt rod which will probably be more useful to you when you go back home. Floating line is all you need.
Some of the Lochs are easier than others, and some you need to be careful if you're wading.

I agree with you. I think a beginner will find bank fishing the Caithness lochs much easier with something like a 9 ft 6 in or 10 ft rod in 6-weight or 6/7-weight, but would struggle a bit with a 9 ft 5-weight.

Col

PS: The windy days outnumber the calm days in Caithness...

 
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mattybhoy

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kingdom o fife
all my fishing from the bank in the highlands is done with my everyday rod , a 10` 6/7 and mostly using a floating line and traditional wets at the business end . however I`ve had some really good days fishing diawl bachs and if conditions suit you can have great fun with dries . :)
 

easker1

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Highlands
I fish a 5 wt (even at DunnetHead) with a WF6 line it does me for every thing, if Lee wulff can fish for salmon on a 4 wt 8ft rod then I can fish for trout with my set up, a heavier rod nearly ended my fishing by knackering my shoulder for a number of years so I stick to light rods , they do me fine:) easker1
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I fish a 5 wt (even at DunnetHead) with a WF6 line it does me for every thing, if Lee wulff can fish for salmon on a 4 wt 8ft rod then I can fish for trout with my set up, a heavier rod nearly ended my fishing by knackering my shoulder for a number of years so I stick to light rods , they do me fine:) easker1

Aye, no issues with that. I just think that someone new to fly fishing would get on much easier with a 9-6 or 10 ft rod in 6 or 6/7-weight.

Col
 

ohanzee

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I'm not a fan of heavier rods in wind, especially longer rods, a 5 weight or 9' is easier to swing in any conditions and the benefit of a 7 weight, although it sounds counter intuitive, is not that much.

When the wind gets up dap:cool:
 

ohanzee

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A common misconception. Dapping is much more effective in a light breeze. ;)

True, and its not the real thing, but when its too windy to cast you can get something close to a dap with a massive fly on regular gear held above your head:D
 

codyarrow

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I'm not a fan of heavier rods in wind, especially longer rods, a 5 weight or 9' is easier to swing in any conditions and the benefit of a 7 weight, although it sounds counter intuitive, is not that much.

When the wind gets up dap:cool:

I dis agree the benefits quite significant. I've never seen anyone dap from the bank.
 

Fishtales

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I dis agree the benefits quite significant. I've never seen anyone dap from the bank.

You've never fished a North of Scotland gale then :) Hold the rod up and the flies go out by themselves, you can't back cast anyway so there is no point in trying :) All you need is a high bank and let the flies dance across the surface along the wind.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0HD9p-3FrA
 

codyarrow

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I'm 250 miles further north from you 365 days a year. In the last decade I've seen one man dapping on Watten once.
 

ohanzee

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I dis agree the benefits quite significant. I've never seen anyone dap from the bank.

Fishing in Tongue season before last, after a couple of hard blustery days, a bank dapper was just setting up as I was leaving defeated, proper dapping rod and he knew how to use it.
My 'semi-dap' is just a get out of jail card when its too windy, a poor relation to the real thing but great fun rather than beat yourself to death.

A heavier line works when its blustery, when its full on wind few try to cast into it, so if your casting down wind why would it matter what weight of line you use? the length of rod makes a far bigger difference, short works for me because its just less rotational resistance against wind.
 
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