Go to camera settings/mode

T_James

Well-known member
Points
18
Location
London
I am going to make a concerted effort to really improve my fishing photography this year. I have a sound understanding of photography so wouldn't describe myself as a total beginner. My first DSLR was purchased two years ago and used for carp fishing self takes and more recently fly fishing captures and scenics.

Up until this week I used purely manual mode, however the more I read about photography the more I appreciate that manual has limitations - for example changing light in mixed sun/clouds.

What modes to you guys use for your fishing (i.e. aperture, shutter priority)?

I use a
Canon 6D mk1
Canon 40mm 2.8stm
GIMP
Gobe polarising filter (in post atm)
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
113
Location
Embra
I tend to use shutter priority with Auto ISO, in conjunction with evaluative metering. In the majority of the fishing situation shots I am taking, the shutter speed is the most important issue, so that is the one I want to take control of. I find evaluative metering is trustworthy enough in the majority of situations. However, I also bracket the non-action shots (3, based at 0, -1, + 1 EV), where possible, to give me the options when evaluative metering doesn't quite get it right... and it also gives me the chance to do HDR blends. Adobe camera RAW is so good now that you can blend almost any set without worrying about registry from hand-held shots. It really helps to get both sky and land good in the same frame.

This was an HDR blend of 3 frames - the camera was moving, the photographer was moving, the subject was moving the boat was moving, the water was moving and the background was moving. All just a case of feeding the 3 frames to ACR and saying do it... and it did...

(Click on images for 1500 px wide view.)


I use manual with Auto ISO - so the camera is still taking care of metering the exposure - in situations where I want to control both shutter speed and aperture... for example the leaping salmon shots...


For action shots, where I am not bracketing, I tend to use +0.5 or even +1 EV with the evaluative metering, to give a bit of ETTR, and on account of my finding over the years that Canon dSLRs tend to underexpose a bit...


I have the 40 mm f2.8 STM - great wee lens. ;) (y)

Col
 

JCP

Well-known member
Points
38
Location
Dorset Wilts Borders & Baja
Hello Captain

Any opinions/experience of video settings.Constant battle with blown highlights.Cannot seem to find a happy medium for moving from ground level to sky during game shooting.I too use auto exposure and fix the shutter speed.I can get away with it to a point using ''Intelligent Exposure'' setting within the camera (Panasonic) but if there is a real fix would like to learn it.
JP
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
113
Location
Embra
Hello Captain

Any opinions/experience of video settings.Constant battle with blown highlights.Cannot seem to find a happy medium for moving from ground level to sky during game shooting.I too use auto exposure and fix the shutter speed.I can get away with it to a point using ''Intelligent Exposure'' setting within the camera (Panasonic) but if there is a real fix would like to learn it.
JP
Sorry, can't help with video - I'm strictly stills. I've done a lot of game shooting shots, though. It's always a problem having to switch quickly between sky and land. Have you tried going fully manual, so you meter on the equivalent of an 18% grey card, and dial that in as fixed settings - ISO, shutter and aperture. It won't change when you swing up and down. You will get some blown sky shots, but a bird against sky won't be a black silhouette...


It's all balance/compromise, though... :)

Col
 

JCP

Well-known member
Points
38
Location
Dorset Wilts Borders & Baja
Sorry, can't help with video - I'm strictly stills. I've done a lot of game shooting shots, though. It's always a problem having to switch quickly between sky and land. Have you tried going fully manual, so you meter on the equivalent of an 18% grey card, and dial that in as fixed settings - ISO, shutter and aperture. It won't change when you swing up and down. You will get some blown sky shots, but a bird against sky won't be a black silhouette...


It's all balance/compromise, though... :)

Col
Good thought Captain I have not tried setting WB on the card I have for run and gun shooting.Will give it a try.I have been using pre-set to lock it down to suit conditions except when camera on a tripod which is not often.Thanks again.

JP
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
113
Location
Embra
Good thought Captain I have not tried setting WB on the card I have for run and gun shooting.Will give it a try.I have been using pre-set to lock it down to suit conditions except when camera on a tripod which is not often.Thanks again.

JP
Hi - sorry for any confusion. I'm not meaning using a grey card to set white balance (colour temperature). I'm meaning using an 18% grey card, or equivalent, to set the exposure to the incident light - the same as used to be done with light meters in the days before exposure meters were built in to cameras. You can't set a camera to the incident light, only to the reflected light, so you need something that is reflecting the right amount of light to give a good exposure if you are going to lock it down. That is where the 18% card comes in. Without one, you have to choose something that is equivalent - a patch of grass that is not heavily shaded - or somebody's mid-tone jacket - something that is not bright sky or dark shadows...

And if you do it that way, you need to keep checking and adjusting, because every time the light level increases or drops, your exposure is going to drift away from ideal. The alternative is to get an old style light meter and keep taking readings of the incident light and keep adjusting settings. I tried it with the pheasant shooting, but it was way too much faff and I went back to metering with the camera. It's a lot easier with stills, because I can make adjustments in Photoshop to correct for land or sky exposure extremes.

Col
 

JCP

Well-known member
Points
38
Location
Dorset Wilts Borders & Baja
Hi - sorry for any confusion. I'm not meaning using a grey card to set white balance (colour temperature). I'm meaning using an 18% grey card, or equivalent, to set the exposure to the incident light - the same as used to be done with light meters in the days before exposure meters were built in to cameras. You can't set a camera to the incident light, only to the reflected light, so you need something that is reflecting the right amount of light to give a good exposure if you are going to lock it down. That is where the 18% card comes in. Without one, you have to choose something that is equivalent - a patch of grass that is not heavily shaded - or somebody's mid-tone jacket - something that is not bright sky or dark shadows...

And if you do it that way, you need to keep checking and adjusting, because every time the light level increases or drops, your exposure is going to drift away from ideal. The alternative is to get an old style light meter and keep taking readings of the incident light and keep adjusting settings. I tried it with the pheasant shooting, but it was way too much faff and I went back to metering with the camera. It's a lot easier with stills, because I can make adjustments in Photoshop to correct for land or sky exposure extremes.

Col
Thanks Captain.Will look into it as not familiar with the process you speak of.
Best JP
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
113
Location
Embra
Thanks Captain.Will look into it as not familiar with the process you speak of.
Best JP
It's essential to understand the basics of exposure - the relationship between the 'volume' of light coming in through the lens and the 3 things that control how much of it is 'recorded' on the sensor - shutter speed, lens aperture and ISO (the sensitivity of the sensor to light). Each time you change one of those 3 by one stop, you either increase or decrease the exposure by double or half the amount of light that is recorded.

The amount of incident light at any given moment is the same, and so the correct exposure should be definable by various combinations of shutter speed, aperture and ISO. But if you tilt the camera up at the sky, the meter goes - "OH, BRIGHT... VERY BRIGHT!" and wants to increase shutter speed and/or close the aperture and/or reduce the ISO value. And if you tilt it down at the shadows, the meter goes - "OH, DARK... VERY DARK!" and wants to slow the shutter speed and/or open up the aperture and/or increase the ISO value. But the light coming from the sun has not changed, and so you should be able to meter for it. An old light meter would measure what was coming from the sun and not be fooled by changing between sky and shadow. You can of course go to full Manual mode, but then you need to keep your eye on the meter reading for the light levels changing.

It's largely a case of getting your head round what is happening with the camera's metering system and learning to control what is happening when you tilt up and down.

For getting your head round the 3 factors in exposure, you can do worse than look up the 'bucket of water' analogy. Rob and I put this together in the early days - it's 10 years old now, and about 10 years out of date with respect to a lot of it, but the 'Principles of Exposure' bit is still valid...

Guide

Col
 

JCP

Well-known member
Points
38
Location
Dorset Wilts Borders & Baja
Help Captain

Think I understand it fairly well but getting the camera to understand is the difficult part bearing in mind most of the time filming game shooting I want good DOF which I cannot achieve by closing down the aperture in manual mode or the ground level shots will be too dark.I use the 180 rule and set the shutter speed to double the frame rate which in my case is 60p.I set everything manually except the aperture and use an exposure compensation facility within the camcorder and just about get away with it most of the time. If I shoot in full auto the exposure compensation is too slow.It is a bit seat of the pants but you know how it is on a shoot day.Need to seize the moment or it is gone.Planning to try some filters on the brighter days which I have resisted thus far for shooting days.Thanks for your input and interest in my dilemma.Some camcorders deploy on board UV filters which could be the answer.My old Canon XL1s had onboard UV and better glass but times have moved on in leaps and bounds in terms of resolution and SD cards are so convenient.I really appreciate your guide link and would like part 2.Take care and be lucky.

Best JP
 
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Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
113
Location
Embra
Think I understand it fairly well but getting the camera to understand is the difficult part bearing in mind most of the time filming game shooting I want good DOF which I cannot achieve by closing down the aperture in manual mode or the ground level shots will be too dark.
As I said before, I can't really help with video, as I am purely stills. For sure, if you stop down the aperture for greater DoF, you need to compensate, either by slower shutter speed or higher ISO. A lot of the time I am "shooting the shooters" I am wide-open with the aperture, and just relying on getting good focus on the subject...

f1.4...


...so it's no easier for stills!

Parts 2 and 3 of the guide we put together are under part 1 - just go to the 'stickies' at the top of the forum photography section. ;)

Col
 

T_James

Well-known member
Points
18
Location
London
What camera and lenses you do use Cap?

Because I need something compact I went for a 6d and 40mm stm, although I very nearly got a first gen A7 - although the limited lens selection and lossy RAW put me off.

I did a lot of research I would have preferred to go mirrorless (Fuji XT2/3) but couldn't afford it.
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
113
Location
Embra
What camera and lenses you do use Cap?
Mostly a Canon 5D mk IV. Various lenses built up over many years. You can get the details of each from the images if you add an Exif viewer to your browser.

This is the one I added to Chrome...



The geolocation never works for me - it puts every image in the middle of the North Sea!

There was a much better one in Firefox, but it disabled at an update to Firefox and the guy didn't update it, so it's a goner. Anyway, fish around for a decent one for your browser.

You may need to click in the image first to free it from the forum software - it will then display at native size - and then right-click in it to get the drop-down menu with the Exif viewer option. That Chrome one actually puts a wee icon in the bottom right corner of the image, so you can click straight onto it to bring up the Exif data.

Col
 

squimp

Well-known member
Points
18
As I said before, I can't really help with video, as I am purely stills. For sure, if you stop down the aperture for greater DoF, you need to compensate, either by slower shutter speed or higher ISO. A lot of the time I am "shooting the shooters" I am wide-open with the aperture, and just relying on getting good focus on the subject...

f1.4...


...so it's no easier for stills!

Parts 2 and 3 of the guide we put together are under part 1 - just go to the 'stickies' at the top of the forum photography section. ;)

Col
That is a gorgeous picture.
 
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