Hardy / Richard Walker fly rod query

Mark Lydon

New member
Joined
Sep 13, 2021
Messages
2
Location
Cumbria
I have in my possession, a 2-piece Hardy fly rod. It`s a 10` foot #7/8 weight. Serial No: DT60243. complete with cloth sleeve and aluminium rod tube.
The rod is in very good condition, so I`ll get it sympathetically cleaned up
It belongs to a neighbour, passed on to him from his late brother. My intention is to get him casting a line, stick one of my reels on it, and get him to catch a trout on it.
Does anyone have any further information on this rod that I may pass on to it`s owner? (i.e. it`s intended design). He thinks he may wish to purchase a reel for it also... what reel might it have been paired with originally?
Thank you in advance of any further information
 

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JohnH

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May 18, 2006
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4,580
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Near Southampton
From memory the name "Farnborough" was given to Hardy's early carbon rods because a lot of the research into the material was done at the Royal Aircraft Establishment based there. Dick Walker worked on radar research at RAE during WW2 and suggested the tie-in of the name. Suspect, but not 100% sure, that Hardy would have retired the name after Dick Walker died in 1985. As a 10 foot #7/8 the rod would have been intended for the heavier end of stillwater fishing, sea trout or possibly as a single handed salmon rod. Reels of the late '70s to mid '80s it might have been teamed with would have included various Hardy Marquis models or maybe a Shakespeare Speedex multiplying fly reel. You may be able to find suitable examples on the second hand market.
 

Mark Lydon

New member
Joined
Sep 13, 2021
Messages
2
Location
Cumbria
From memory the name "Farnborough" was given to Hardy's early carbon rods because a lot of the research into the material was done at the Royal Aircraft Establishment based there. Dick Walker worked on radar research at RAE during WW2 and suggested the tie-in of the name. Suspect, but not 100% sure, that Hardy would have retired the name after Dick Walker died in 1985. As a 10 foot #7/8 the rod would have been intended for the heavier end of stillwater fishing, sea trout or possibly as a single handed salmon rod. Reels of the late '70s to mid '80s it might have been teamed with would have included various Hardy Marquis models or maybe a Shakespeare Speedex multiplying fly reel. You may be able to find suitable examples on the second hand market.
Thank you for your consideration and response John. Very much appreciated.
One source seems to think that the rod was developed especially for the Farnborough reservoir. This could well be the case as the original owner worked at Porton Down, so was located to support that possibility. (He also lived in Northumberland, so that`s another possible link to the Hardy element).
You`re in the right era too, apparently the serial number indicates the rod was manufactured April 1985.

I`ll be sure to pass your info on...
Thank you
 
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