Haul a Roll.

Rhithrogena

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Jun 30, 2020
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572
double spey by at first casting parallel to the bank then double spey across
Spey casting was developed on rivers for downstream wet fly fishing. Whether to use a double or single Spey depends on wind direction. You need to avoid the wind blowing onto your casting shoulder - the cast could easily impale you with the fly. Traditionally, on rivers, if the wind is blowing Downstream you use Double Spey. For a canal, you may always be be able to choose a section where you can fish with an 'upstream' wind (the wind blowing left to right assuming a right handed caster), and use the easier single Spey at all times. So if you have a left to right wind, you use single Spey, and work your way down the bank to your left.
I meant to add that my deadliest fly by far on those shallow Lincolnshire drains was a deerhair mouse on a 3/0. Make the fly land with a splash and jerk it back. Very exciting. Obviously you target cover, weeds, lillies, bushes and hang on!
I tied those flies with a stiff mono weedguard so you could literally pull it through lily beds....
This has brought back fond memories. I really hope to have a chance at some pike again as soon as lockdown is lifted and I can visit family in Lincoln.
 

Rhithrogena

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Jun 30, 2020
Messages
572
Set up for a roll cast at the end of every retrieve - you can retrieve almost to your feet when setting this up, if you get a take at this point then roll cast to set the hook
Pike very often follow and take as the fly is very close to you. You need to retrieve all the way back. Setting up for a roll will create slack and I'm not convinced it will allow you to hook smash takes on a big hook.
Better to keep a low rod and retrieve all the way back - being ready for a smash take right at the end. Work the line out in the normal manner, a pike fly is heavy enough to flick some fly line out of the tip to get started.
 

pedros

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Joined
Mar 30, 2008
Messages
477
Location
Chester, UK
Spey casting was developed on rivers for downstream wet fly fishing. Whether to use a double or single Spey depends on wind direction. You need to avoid the wind blowing onto your casting shoulder - the cast could easily impale you with the fly. Traditionally, on rivers, if the wind is blowing Downstream you use Double Spey. For a canal, you may always be be able to choose a section where you can fish with an 'upstream' wind (the wind blowing left to right assuming a right handed caster), and use the easier single Spey at all times. So if you have a left to right wind, you use single Spey, and work your way down the bank to your left.
I meant to add that my deadliest fly by far on those shallow Lincolnshire drains was a deerhair mouse on a 3/0. Make the fly land with a splash and jerk it back. Very exciting. Obviously you target cover, weeds, lillies, bushes and hang on!
I tied those flies with a stiff mono weedguard so you could literally pull it through lily beds....
This has brought back fond memories. I really hope to have a chance at some pike again as soon as lockdown is lifted and I can visit family in Lincoln.
 

pedros

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Joined
Mar 30, 2008
Messages
477
Location
Chester, UK
Good points and good advice. As stated I am only just starting out on this pike fly journey. Its never always that convenient to choose the section, especially with the current lockdown. Luckily my canal is within walking distance. Most journeys I have are with the wind direction thus far, L-R as a right handed caster, so akin to a downstream wind, hence the double Spey. Also with nearside weed a single Spey has becomes little risky with the wind I've found - although probs just me....
I would suggest the most useful casting tip is learn to cast from both shoulders on canals then take it from there - I pride myself on my ability to do this ;)
 

Rhithrogena

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Jun 30, 2020
Messages
572
Most journeys I have are with the wind direction thus far, L-R as a right handed caster, so akin to a downstream wind, hence the double Spey. Also with nearside weed a single Spey has becomes little risky with the wind I've found - although probs just me....
But since there is no flow, you can choose to cast across at an angle to your left with a single Spey, the wind will keep the D-loop off your casting shoulder. Take a couple of paces left each cast and go again, right hand single Spey, with the right hand, casting into the wind The loop sizes are similar with the double and single versions so this isn't an issue with weed etc. If the wind changes direction, work into the wind the other way up the bank and practice your left hand single Spey. If the wind is very strong the double Spey nakes sense because the wind will help the forward cast. You will soon develop your own ninor tactics. Anything that gets the fly out is a start.
The best of luck.
Rich
 
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