Hello folks

Vintage Badger

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
192
Location
Cheshire
I've just joined so thought I'd better say hello. I'm Jules from Cheshire and started fly fishing in the late 1980s then gave it a break in the mid 90s, returned to it for a couple of years in the late 00s before getting too busy with work and life again. I've recently decided to start again and have (probably sensibly) booked a 2 hour lesson with an instructor to get my casting sorted out before I start fishing. That's happening next week and I'm really looking forward to it and have been busy checking my fishing kit is in full working order! So it's back to chucking fluff for me next week for the first time in a decade, wish me luck! :)
 

Vintage Badger

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
192
Location
Cheshire
Thanks for the welcome everyone. In answer to @LukeNZ , I've mainly fished small still-waters as that's what's been easiest for me to access. However, I'm hoping to fish some small streams and rivers this year for wild brown trout, as that's what I'd really like to do.

I love fishing dry fly with some of the vintage split cane fly rods that I own, and which I bought in the early 90s back in the days when nobody seemed to want cane rods anymore and good quality, lesser-known brands could be bought for around £20 or so. Luckily I saw them as craftsman-built things of beauty and stocked up while they were cheap!

Although I have two 'modern' good-quality graphite fly rods, which are lovely to cast, I don't think there's anything quite like catching and playing a trout with a vintage cane rod on a dry fly, and it's even better if I've tied the fly myself. Not that I'm much good at fly tying, so it probably adds something of a miracle factor to the whole experience!
 

LukeNZ

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2017
Messages
3,166
Location
Hawke’s Bay, NZ
Thanks for the welcome everyone. In answer to @LukeNZ , I've mainly fished small still-waters as that's what's been easiest for me to access. However, I'm hoping to fish some small streams and rivers this year for wild brown trout, as that's what I'd really like to do.

I love fishing dry fly with some of the vintage split cane fly rods that I own, and which I bought in the early 90s back in the days when nobody seemed to want cane rods anymore and good quality, lesser-known brands could be bought for around £20 or so. Luckily I saw them as craftsman-built things of beauty and stocked up while they were cheap!

Although I have two 'modern' good-quality graphite fly rods, which are lovely to cast, I don't think there's anything quite like catching and playing a trout with a vintage cane rod on a dry fly, and it's even better if I've tied the fly myself. Not that I'm much good at fly tying, so it probably adds something of a miracle factor to the whole experience!

Fly tying is not really as difficult as it seems if your goal is merely to catch trout on flies of your making.

It becomes much more of a chore if you become too concerned with it as an art form. I am solely interested in their working ‘fishing form’.

Given my UK past passion for salmon fishing, my obsession is trout spey (two handed rods) which is perfect for the wide rivers in my immediate locale ((Hawke’s Bay) and pretty much everywhere here in NZ.

You will see many excellent examples of all styles of fly tying on this forum too. There are some very talented people that contribute, also on the cane twigs too!

Cheers and beers,
Luke.
 
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