Help with fish ID please

Coarse Rich

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May 24, 2020
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Hi everyone.
I caught this 2lb 12oz fish last August on the river Stour (on worm I'm afraid) and at the time thought it was just a decent brown trout
It's since been suggested by those with more experience than me that it could be a sea trout, what does everyone think? What differences are you looking for?
Thanks
Screenshot_20200524-181949_WhatsApp.jpg
 

Coarse Rich

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May 24, 2020
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Thanks Mike. That's what I thought. This is the picture that sparked the debate, it does look a bit more silvery in this one.Screenshot_20200524-190826_WhatsApp.jpg
 

mike fox

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There would definitely be sea trout coming into the river at that time of year, but looking at the yellowish belly, I would still suggest it was a brown.
 

aenoon

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Hi everyone.
I caught this 2lb 12oz fish last August on the river Stour (on worm I'm afraid) and at the time thought it was just a decent brown trout
It's since been suggested by those with more experience than me that it could be a sea trout, what does everyone think? What differences are you looking for?
Thanks
View attachment 26854
Viewing your first picture in the net, I would say it was a sea trout, been in river for a while, looking at your second picture, where you are holding it, I would say it was a Brownie!
First picture in net, the spots are very asterisk shaped, and it has the light biege/brown back, often associated with sea trout that have been back in river a while.
In the pic where you are holding it spots aint so obvious, but hey, is a lovely fish whatever!
regards
Bert
 

speytime

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I think it's a brown trout, the sea trout I've caught that's been in a while look more black than brown?

Your fish looks pretty plump, again ime they have lost that plump look/feel when coloured up.
It's a nice fish regardless of being sea run or not.

Al
 

taffy1

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Who's to say what that particular fish is. The varying colouration for brownies is diverse. All brownies are well capable of having a visit down to the salty stuff whether as sea run brownies or slob trout that feed in estuaries.. Nice fish by the way
 
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bobmiddlepoint

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Its a brown trout. Sea trout are sea run brown trout. He was probably on his way out to sea.
Can you explain the bit in bold?

I used to catch a lot of stale sea trout in the Dorset Frome that looked not unlike that fish in many ways although they were never quite so brown around the fins.


Andy
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Hi everyone.
I caught this 2lb 12oz fish last August on the river Stour (on worm I'm afraid) and at the time thought it was just a decent brown trout
It's since been suggested by those with more experience than me that it could be a sea trout, what does everyone think? What differences are you looking for?
Thanks
Everyone has their own take on the whole, "is it a sea trout or is it a brown trout?" thing, every time it crops up. My tuppenceworth...

As has been said, they are all brown trout. And all brown trout migrate to some extent. For practical purposes, you can do away with the term 'sea trout' (though the law would dispute that!). Just imagine the question without there being such a thing as a 'sea trout'. The question then is more a case of how much migrating has this fish done... how far and for how long. Studies on the trout of the Loch Lomond/River Leven and surrounding estuary system shows there is no sharp line between migratory and non-migratory trout. They come and go between fresh and saltwater on a regular basis. Orkney fish are known to do similar. It's more of a greyscale than a black and white situation. For sure, there are the 'bars of silver', fresh off the tide that we all recognise as 'sea trout'. But there are a great many others that cannot be pigeon-holed without measuring the level of strontium in their scales (the acid test).

When you show some folk who are not familiar with Lomond fish a typical one, caught in August/September time, they often declare it to be a brown trout, based on its colour. Fish like this...



But the guys with their own boats on the loch who fish it all year would call that a sea trout with no hesitation. Those fish are simply not in the loch if you fish it in June/July. If it was a brown trout, why would it only appear in the loch in August/September?

Here is another sea trout...



That one had sea lice on it - they had failed to be killed-off due to the high salinity of the water in East Loch Bee, South Uist, when the flood-gates broke.

Really, the answer every time anyone asks the question: "Is this a sea trout?" is that the person asking is the one best-placed to answer. They know the details surrounding it, while the people they are asking do not. And if no one can answer with any certainty, then don't ask. Instead, just wonder about it... 😜

They are all brown trout. Some get bigger than others by feeding in the sea, and some of them look a bit like salmon... and we like them because of that.

Col
 

Coarse Rich

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May 24, 2020
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Thanks for all the replies.
To summarise: we don't know! But not knowing doesn't lessen the enjoyment of catching the fish.
 
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