He's Fallen in the Water,( High pitched Squeaky voice)

GEK79

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,254
Location
Irleand
×











×
I have fallen in twice in the last two years might be because I've a dodgy left ankle due to rheumatoid arthritis or my balance is slightly wonky,I'm near 62,but the best one yet in the no fool like an old fool happened Tuesday,the bin was full I climbed in to said bin and it didn't like that the bin went one way I went,well I'm not to sure where I went,but landed on the bin on my back scraped my right calf from knee to ankle and I think the damn thing is now infected,I bolted into the house and was grateful that no one including my wife or youngest son had the opportunity of making me a YouTube sensation
Isn't it mad.. When I fell back first into the river I looked straight up to the bridge to make sure it hadn't been caught.. Hope your okay mate.
 

easker1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 10, 2010
Messages
6,714
Location
Highlands
there were some people over the loch and one of the guys said did you fall in , that was almost a mile away, luckily they were almost sympathetic, easker1
 

Scotty Mitchell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 25, 2020
Messages
327
Location
The Kingdom of Fife
Let me just point out that your 'local' is an airlift to hospital, take care up there.

This^^^^^^^.
Being an ex reconnaissance platoon soldier, I know I can be a bit blasé at times in the "field", but one minor slip one day on the North Assynt estate rammed it home.
I was on my own, and had not fished the route I had suggested to my Mrs.
I simply slipped on a rock and quickly righted myself, but the thought shot in, what if I had went down and hit my head.... Approx 2 hours from a road.... No one knew even roughly where I was...... Jeez. I actually felt sick. I think it's an age thing.
Nowadays I don't stray far from where I said I was going if I'm alone.
We are not indestructible.
 

JohnH

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2006
Messages
4,413
Location
Near Southampton
Several years ago I was fishing a River Eliminator on the River Teign in Devon. A lovely little river in really cracking scenery....Memo to self: Get a better set of waders!
I can empathise with Bob in 2 ways. First, the Teign is just as good as he describes it, and I have had some memorable sport there with wild and stocked browns and also my PB sea trout on fly - an epic fish. But there are rocks varying in size from the equivalents of grapefruit to car seats in amongst the gravel river bed, and they can't be avoided. I would not dream of wading it without studded chest waders and a wading staff... I caught the sea trout at night fishing from the bank not wading, btw.
 
Last edited:

loxie

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2016
Messages
458
Best I can do was when I was a kid. Cycling along the Staffs & Worcs canal in winter or early spring my bike hit one of those eroded bits caused by the wash from boats. I wobbled one way, then the other, then the other and then went over......into the canal. My life flashed before me as I envisaged sinking into the murky depths with my bike dragging me down. Turned out it was only about a foot or so deep. I hauled myself out and my bike - totally soaked to the skin.

Fortunately, there were some anglers on the other side who......fell around pissing themselves with laughter.

No choice but to cycle back home, about 5 miles or more, soaking wet and cold.

Does that qualify for an "absolute nails" @ohanzee ? You have to remember, I'm a soft southerner ;)
I learnt to swim like that when I was 4. Cold January day I rode my bike in to one of the ponds by my parents house. Ended up in 5 feet of water with the bike on top of me. I somehow got out and made it back to the house before I passed out from the cold. Not an experience I'd recommend to any young cyclists!
 

petevicar

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
1,381
Location
Right bank of the river Rhine.
I have always been very careful when river fishing as one of my fishing buddies would take a swim on most trips. I managed to avoid getting wet.

However fishing in a tournament in Key West I got wet on the way back.
My guide was chasing another boat and both guides were fooling around, I think a few beers were involved.
I was sitting in the skiff as the two boats competed to be first back to the dock. I looked away for a moment and saw that our boat was going to crash into the other. My guide quickly turned the wheel and I flew out of the boat.
We were travelling at about 40 mph. At that speed water is very hard.
We were in about 15ft of water so I managed to get back into the boat quite quickly.
The whole of my left side was bruised and I was black and blue for about a week after.
 

iainmortimer

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2014
Messages
3,031
Location
West Sussex
Walking along a high river bank a few years ago and suddenly there was no bank under the grass I placed my foot on. I swear it happened in slow motion .
My first thought was , don't break the bloody rod , so I shot my arm out to one side which caused my whole body to spin as I fell.
I landed flat on my back with a bang, in about a foot of water and it knocked the air out of my lungs.
I remember sitting up in the river and all I could think was ' is there anyone around who saw this?'.
There wasn't , but I felt extremely embarassed as I waddled off back to the car ,soaked to the skin.
I did a similar thing a few years back when fishing the burns and hill lochs around Lochgoilhead.

One of the burns snaked about all over he place and so rather than stick to one bank it was easier to use the nice flat rocks to switch from one side to the other and so keep a roughly straight line between pools. At one point was a fairly large flat rock which made the perfect fishing platform leading into a nice deep pool. Full of confidence and focussed on the rising fish I stepped out only to discover the nice flat, lichen covered rock was in fact a thick layer of scum sitting over a scour pool. I dropped in up to my chest and so had the joys of walking about 3 miles back to the hotel/lodge covered in scum and duckweed - my wife was not impressed although the receptionist thought it hilarious!
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
38,658
This^^^^^^^.
Being an ex reconnaissance platoon soldier, I know I can be a bit blasé at times in the "field", but one minor slip one day on the North Assynt estate rammed it home.
I was on my own, and had not fished the route I had suggested to my Mrs.
I simply slipped on a rock and quickly righted myself, but the thought shot in, what if I had went down and hit my head.... Approx 2 hours from a road.... No one knew even roughly where I was...... Jeez. I actually felt sick. I think it's an age thing.
Nowadays I don't stray far from where I said I was going if I'm alone.
We are not indestructible.
Its pretty rare to have an injury fishing hill lochs, rivers are way more dangerous, but if you think about it you can find yourself camped further and further in just a couple of days, my only really scary moment was camped at a remote loch near Tongue, half a days walk and mostly flat, I forded a shallow river on the way, the weather turned nasty and I prepped to make a rapid extraction, got to the top of the first hill and...the river I forded was a flooded valley in both directions, I spent an hour trying to find high ground to see a way round it and finally resigned to dig in till the weather passed, I was trapped 3 days with rain rods hammering the tent, made a couple of aborted attempts and just got soaked, there is a strange panic that sets in when you realise that just being wet can be serious.
Typically on the third day it just stopped and the sun came out😑
 

lhomme

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2010
Messages
3,649
Location
Antwerp
I've taken a few dips, I guess the more you spend at the water, the more you spend in it. Got quite exciting a couple of times but I always took it as part of the experience, a wet one nevertheless.
P6050060.JPG
 

shropshire_lad

Well-known member
Joined
May 31, 2017
Messages
2,450
Location
Too far away from the wild places!
Its pretty rare to have an injury fishing hill lochs, rivers are way more dangerous, but if you think about it you can find yourself camped further and further in just a couple of days, my only really scary moment was camped at a remote loch near Tongue, half a days walk and mostly flat, I forded a shallow river on the way, the weather turned nasty and I prepped to make a rapid extraction, got to the top of the first hill and...the river I forded was a flooded valley in both directions, I spent an hour trying to find high ground to see a way round it and finally resigned to dig in till the weather passed, I was trapped 3 days with rain rods hammering the tent, made a couple of aborted attempts and just got soaked, there is a strange panic that sets in when you realise that just being wet can be serious.
Typically on the third day it just stopped and the sun came out😑
A similar thing happened to Alexander Supertramp (Chris McCandless) and it did not end happily :(

 

noddy299

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 12, 2017
Messages
296
Location
Durham
I fish the welsh dee a few times a year and spend almost all of that time falling/flailing. Good fishing generally, terrible wading though. The bedrock is dreadful and if you find your footing is between/next to a boulder you sometimes just have to accept the fall to get away from it. I use my landing net as a staff but all it does is help me find the item before I then proceed to trip over it.
 

Scotty Mitchell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 25, 2020
Messages
327
Location
The Kingdom of Fife
I fish the welsh dee a few times a year and spend almost all of that time falling/flailing. Good fishing generally, terrible wading though. The bedrock is dreadful and if you find your footing is between/next to a boulder you sometimes just have to accept the fall to get away from it. I use my landing net as a staff but all it does is help me find the item before I then proceed to trip over it.
I've fished the Dee twice so I know exactly what you mean! That bedrock is like ice!
 

shropshire_lad

Well-known member
Joined
May 31, 2017
Messages
2,450
Location
Too far away from the wild places!
My god its exactly the same, well ok its not really:)
If you a see a convenient looking bus parked next time you have such an escapade probably best avoid it. Oh, and don't eat the berries ;)

The book "Into The Wild" is fantastic as indeed is the film.

That bus has now been moved I believe as it was proving a rather hazardous magnet for pilgrimages.
 

loxie

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2016
Messages
458
This^^^^^^^.
Being an ex reconnaissance platoon soldier, I know I can be a bit blasé at times in the "field", but one minor slip one day on the North Assynt estate rammed it home.
I was on my own, and had not fished the route I had suggested to my Mrs.
I simply slipped on a rock and quickly righted myself, but the thought shot in, what if I had went down and hit my head.... Approx 2 hours from a road.... No one knew even roughly where I was...... Jeez. I actually felt sick. I think it's an age thing.
Nowadays I don't stray far from where I said I was going if I'm alone.
We are not indestructible.
A few years ago it was a blazing hot July day and I went for a look above my beat. Mine was the top of that particular river and a good mile and a half from the car park over rough ground with very little useable mobile phone signal. I crossed the river and coming back jumped on to an old concrete platform. Sadly it had been undermined and collapsed and I dropped straight down. Nowadays I'd be fine as my tummy would get in the way but then my ribcage was the first contact point. I ended up in the river in shock and unable to breath. Luckily I managed to get some air in and I lay on the bank with my feet in the water for ten minutes before I could breathe properly. I took my wading jacket off to examine the damage and was surprised my fly box looked fine as I distinctly heard it crack. It was then I realised the injury was a bit more severe than I thought. Again I was lucky to be pretty tough and relatively young and fit but the walk back to the car hurt a lot. Then 3 miles of driving on a forestry track back to where I was staying. Ouch.

It brings home the dangers of fishing quite sharply and now none of my teams go alone to that beat without a VHF radio, and check in every 2 hours. If I'd hit my head I could well have been killed and it would have been a very tough gig if my father, who is in his eighties,had been in my place. It really only takes a second of poor luck or judgement and the nearest hospital was 70 miles away.

I joke about it now but it was nearly 2 years before my ribs were fully healed.
 

caeran

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 29, 2012
Messages
158
With regard to being stranded in a remote location and you want to summon help.

You might already be aware of this app , if so I apologise .


When off the beaten track and you need to let someone else know your precise location , it could be to let a fishing pal know exactly where you are on the riverbank or waters edge or god forbid an emergency in a rural location
Then what 3 words could help
The app developers have covered the globe with a grid - each square on the grid is 3 metres square
So you can pinpoint your location anywhere in the world to within three metres.
Each square is designated 3 words .
If you relay these three words to your mate , assuming they have the app , or the emergency services then they will know exactly where you are .
A lot less complicated than OS grid references and easy to use.


Even offline it can be used in a limited way



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:
Top