High Tarns: Tippet/Leader Set-up?

Whinging pom

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Jun 10, 2021
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I quite the switch down, going up is the one that gets me, going from light to heavy is great for the first cast that goes out dead easy then it's a chore of heavier swing weight, but I do recognise the frustration, first cast going down feels delicate and precise but you can end up using more energy to get the line to go anywhere far.

I thought the OP's 6 weight Orvis sounded fine.
Don't forget you are not an intermediate caster and are more able to use a six-weight consistently with some finesse in presentation, the other thing is you will be able to switch rods and soon get the feel and feedback of a new setup.

I'm not sure if the OP is a really good caster like you, but if he's anything like me if he's been on a 6wt as his go-to rod and then down to a 4wt if he uses it in a fishing situation he will be tending to overpower it trying to feel some response from the blank, It feels dead even when your loops and turn over tell you tells you that your actually powering about right. It can lead you to feel disheartened with your gear.
For me it takes more than a few casts, it takes a few sessions to start to understand the feel of a rod and feel at home with it., then start to feel comfortable confidently using the variety of casts needed for the challenges.

what do think of a 9'6 or even 10' from what I've experienced with tarns, with long casts you have so much line in the surface to strike against, often have to make mends as those wind-driven bows appear in your line, and for close work you can almost dap it with the extra height.?
 

ohanzee

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Don't forget you are not an intermediate caster and are more able to use a six-weight consistently with some finesse in presentation, the other thing is you will be able to switch rods and soon get the feel and feedback of a new setup.

I'm not sure if the OP is a really good caster like you, but if he's anything like me if he's been on a 6wt as his go-to rod and then down to a 4wt if he uses it in a fishing situation he will be tending to overpower it trying to feel some response from the blank, It feels dead even when your loops and turn over tell you tells you that your actually powering about right. It can lead you to feel disheartened with your gear.
For me it takes more than a few casts, it takes a few sessions to start to understand the feel of a rod and feel at home with it., then start to feel comfortable confidently using the variety of casts needed for the challenges.

what do think of a 9'6 or even 10' from what I've experienced with tarns, with long casts you have so much line in the surface to strike against, often have to make mends as those wind-driven bows appear in your line, and for close work you can almost dap it with the extra height.?

I think if you can chop oak logs with a heavy axe then finely slice an onion with a much lighter sharp knife, it's something similar to switching rod weights, you have to be sensitive to the tool, feel it even...there is that word again :whistle:

My answer to your last question might get some interesting responses, I like a short rod when I have a slope or obstructions behind, it lets me lift the back cast over trouble easier and psychologically more precisely, lots of people have argued a longer rod does this better, makes a good debate.
 

bbamboo

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County Durham
I don’t know if anyone else will agree with me, but after casting my 9’ 5 wt, when I go down to the 8’6”4 wt it takes ages to get the ‘feel’ of it. I was practicing shooting into the wind with it yesterday and working on line speed. Though the line and turnover looks good( for me 😕) it’s actually frustrating the lightness of it and lack of feed back. (Mind you casting a 6’2wt yesterday felt almost stupid).
Give yourself some time to get used it and make it ‘your rod’, so when you get up to the high tarns, your fishing with an old familiar friend, not being frustrated by a comparative stranger!
if I was in your position, I’d take it to Blea tarn above the Langdale valley. ( or somewhere similar) It’s about 400 yards from parking. Nobody stops at that part of the pass. The tarn is a proper mountain water where the ripple line is constantly shifting and huge areas of glossy calm appear… and it’s full of little wild browns. But it can be as frustrating as hell. Ive walked down the path early morning seeing the whole surface alive with rising fish and then a shift in the wind and the whole place turns off. You’ve got the wind, gorse , stupidly placed rocks, and fussy little feeders. Perfect dress rehearsal without the hike and the views of the langdales are stunning.
Yes the difference between a good and bad rod is a good days fishing 👍😉
 

dgp

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Jun 1, 2013
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Wales.
Black Bob's Bits (#12-16)
Black and Red Half Hog(#12-16)
Black Popper Hopper (#10-12)
Wyatt DHS (#12-14 not black but deadly 😉)
In Wales in the high lakes I always carry a beetle pattern - usually the Coch y Bonddu but no idea if they work in the Lakes and a black beetle which when pulled on the surface in a wave can result in a great response- I guess like the popper hopper. Snall sedge patterns are essential
 

Overmiwadrers

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Mar 25, 2018
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Yorkshire
wind-driven bows appear in your line, and for close work you can almost dap it with the extra height.?
I think if you can chop oak logs with a heavy axe then finely slice an onion with a much lighter sharp knife, it's something similar to switching rod weights, you have to be sensitive to the tool, feel it even...there is that word again :whistle:

My answer to your last question might get some interesting responses, I like a short rod when I have a slope or obstructions behind, it lets me lift the back cast over trouble easier and psychologically more precisely, lots of people have argued a longer rod does this better, makes a good debate.
I fish lots of small streams as well as larger rivers and routinely fish with rods in the various sizes 7ft 3 wts / 9ft 4 wts / and for sea trout 9ft 6 inch 7 wt. I generally fish with rods on the softer / slower side , I find that switching rods is easier when using rods that require a more relaxed action. But interestingly I find that one stream where you are in the water with high banks requires a good few steeple type casts then a shorter stiffer faster action makes that lift off and high back cast easier.
Not sure if this is the point you were making.

O M W
 

ohanzee

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But interestingly I find that one stream where you are in the water with high banks requires a good few steeple type casts then a shorter stiffer faster action makes that lift off and high back cast easier.
Not sure if this is the point you were making.

It is exactly.
 

Gary Coggon

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Oct 10, 2021
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Smallwood
Many thanks again, All, for such a rewarding conversation. I‘ve been beavering away sifting a list of flies from your recommendations and just need to decide where to buy them. Who would you say are the stand-out suppliers, particularly of ones like the Hopper Popper I’m especially looking forward to using?
 

codyarrow

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Feb 6, 2010
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4,962
Walked the banks of Ennerdale last week. Thought these waters are nothing like scottish hill lochs, something about the geology creates a different fishing picture. From fishing there 35 years ago small wets on hen hackles would win out percentage wise 80 : 20 over the season.
 

dgp

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Jun 1, 2013
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Wales.
Many thanks again, All, for such a rewarding conversation. I‘ve been beavering away sifting a list of flies from your recommendations and just need to decide where to buy them. Who would you say are the stand-out suppliers, particularly of ones like the Hopper Popper I’m especially looking forward to using?
I like the Fulling Mill popper Hopper but I think only do it in size 10. I want smaller flies - 12 or 14 so I tie my own !
 

Capeldrae

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May 17, 2006
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1,132
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Kinglassie
Many thanks again, All, for such a rewarding conversation. I‘ve been beavering away sifting a list of flies from your recommendations and just need to decide where to buy them. Who would you say are the stand-out suppliers, particularly of ones like the Hopper Popper I’m especially looking forward to using?
Fastmail tackle do a range of popper hoppers, the black and red one has been very kind to me.
 

Returning Dave

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May 12, 2021
Messages
28
Location
Wirral
I've started fishing welsh upland llyns thus year, very similar i would have thought.
Cast and step to the left or right and repeat, you'll cover more fish.
I use either a #5 or #7, my dad uses a #6.
I've started either using Seaguar Red Label or Seaguar Riverge in 5 or 7lb.
Flies are tricky, the llyns i fish seem to have specific local patterns which the fish favour, although they will take the traditionals.
 

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