Highlander Boats - any experience?

bobmiddlepoint

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The short answer is no.
Looking at the website they appear to be very clean tidy boats with no sticky out bits to catch lines and nets.
On the other hand the rear seat looks to be too far back to be of much use in fishing (not an issue if you use a boat seat). I would have my doubts about the screws holding the thole pin/thole pin plates in place, I'm not sure they look man enough for the job in heavy seas but they might look better in the flesh.


Andy
 

Bobfly2

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They also do rowlocks but our existing oars are all thole pin fittings. 95% of all users have electrics and oars are little used. Loch is about 68 acres and pretty sheltered.
I recognise the mooring pontoon location in the first Club15 photo so could call by for a chat with that boat hire business.
 

Bobfly2

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Cheers for that. The pontoons picture I am sure is Loch Earn as I pass by quite often. That gives me 2 possibilities.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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The club 15 ones look like the boats at Frandy fishery. Might be worth giving them a call . If they are then you’ll be fine. They do the job well

Yeh - I'm fairly sure Frandy has those boats...

Frandy06Sep20_1647-HDR.jpg


They are OK. I don't think they are as good as the Sweeney Lomond boats.

But none of them put the rear thwart where it needs to be for the angler in the stern (particularly if he's a leftie) to sit comfortably without him bringing his own seating arrangement with him. Sweeneys are even worse...

Yoga-block_1300.jpg


Coulams about the same as the Highlanders...

Glencorse12May19_2596.jpg


Added to which, I don't know a single person who likes Coulams as drifting boats.

The Chew/Blagdon boats were the best for fishing from...

43511.jpg


All you needed was a cushion. Why can nobody build a boat like those?

This one is almost identical to the Sweeney Lomond - it's essentially the same mould...


Again, the seating is all wrong for fishing. It is available with thole pins, rather than rowlocks. The farther of these two on Grogarry in 2017 was a Heyland...

Uist-2017_8208.jpg


... and had thole pins...

Uist-2017_8226.jpg


I remember we had a struggle to mount both the petrol and Minn Kota on the transom - something that is easy on a Sweeney or Coulam...

Uist13_5485.jpg


Hope18_2414.jpg


... but impossible on a Highlander.

Col
 

fruinfisher

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I’ll agree with what you have to say . My way of thinking was that they are nice and stable, they seem very robustly built and will take a lot of abuse and are probably pretty low maintenance
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I’ll agree with what you have to say . My way of thinking was that they are nice and stable, they seem very robustly built and will take a lot of abuse and are probably pretty low maintenance

Sure - it's just my own preference as much as anything. The one reservation I have, maintenance-wise, is the rubber moulding round the gunwale, inside and out. I have been in a few of those boats where it is coming adrift, and a big loop of it is hanging down inside the boat.

Col
 

fruinfisher

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Ok- I’ll take your word on that as you’ll have a lot more experience than I have . My observation is that of all the fisheries I’ve been to, the Frandy boats seem the ones needing the least amount of attention ( or maybe they’re just properly maintained)
 

Bobfly2

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The Heyland Flycatcher is pretty much identical to the Lomond 15 and the same moulding. I mentioned these various Highlander boats as I had not known about them. Look solid and only the rear seating a bit poor.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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The Heyland Flycatcher is pretty much identical to the Lomond 15 and the same moulding. I mentioned these various Highlander boats as I had not known about them. Look solid and only the rear seating a bit poor.

Aye, I mean... any boat builders out there... copy that Blagdon boat....

a) Put the rear thwart just less than an arm's length from the tiller of the outboard.
b) Put the rear and bow thwarts up, just less than level with the gunwale.

(y)
 

bobmiddlepoint

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The Heyland Flycatcher is pretty much identical to the Lomond 15 and the same moulding.

The Heyland things do indeed appear to be out of the same mould as the Sweenys but they do behave very differently. We had both Sweenys and Heylands on Uist. Most of the differences are only really apparent if you are using the oars and I realise very few do these days but us ghillies (and ex ghillies) still uphold the art of rowing.

The Heylands are much heavier than the Sweenys which makes them a bugger to launch off the shore single handed when they have been pulled up for the night and the loch has dropped. Being heavier they drift slightly better and yaw about less but are sods to turn quickly on the oars. When you are on the oars and one rod gets into a fish that goes around the wrong end of the boat you need to spin the boat quickly (especially if they are "rotund" anglers in boat seats). With the Sweeny boat one big heave in opposite directions on both oars will turn the boat 180 degrees in a few seconds, the Heyland ones only go around after three or four big pulls on the sticks. With the Sweenys being so much more maneuverable you could fish much closer into the shore in big winds before having to pull out. With the Heylands you just couldn't go in as close as you wanted on the salmon/sea trout lochs, indeed while I was on Uist the Heylands were not put on the salmon/sea trout lochs for this very reason.

None of the ghillies on Uist were very keen on the Heyland boats, OK for drifting featureless water but very awkward around the skerries and weeds in any sort of wind.

I wouldn't grow flowers in a Coulam, the bloody thing would drift off the garden on a random zig zag path!


Andy
 

Cap'n Fishy

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The Heyland things do indeed appear to be out of the same mould as the Sweenys but they do behave very differently. We had both Sweenys and Heylands on Uist. Most of the differences are only really apparent if you are using the oars and I realise very few do these days but us ghillies (and ex ghillies) still uphold the art of rowing.

The Heylands are much heavier than the Sweenys which makes them a bugger to launch off the shore single handed when they have been pulled up for the night and the loch has dropped. Being heavier they drift slightly better and yaw about less but are sods to turn quickly on the oars. When you are on the oars and one rod gets into a fish that goes around the wrong end of the boat you need to spin the boat quickly (especially if they are "rotund" anglers in boat seats). With the Sweeny boat one big heave in opposite directions on both oars will turn the boat 180 degrees in a few seconds, the Heyland ones only go around after three or four big pulls on the sticks. With the Sweenys being so much more maneuverable you could fish much closer into the shore in big winds before having to pull out. With the Heylands you just couldn't go in as close as you wanted on the salmon/sea trout lochs, indeed while I was on Uist the Heylands were not put on the salmon/sea trout lochs for this very reason.

None of the ghillies on Uist were very keen on the Heyland boats, OK for drifting featureless water but very awkward around the skerries and weeds in any sort of wind.

I wouldn't grow flowers in a Coulam, the bloody thing would drift off the garden on a random zig zag path!


Andy

So, if the Sweeneys and the Heylands come out the same moulds, why the massive difference between them?
shrug.001.gif
 

bobmiddlepoint

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So, if the Sweeneys and the Heylands come out the same moulds, why the massive difference between them?
shrug.001.gif

I think it is simply weight, there is more fibreglass in the Heylands (and an extra buoyancy tank under the middle seat which just gets in the way of your feet/dog/tackle bag/net).

Oddly the Heyland website now gives a weight of 140kg for the 15 footer, I am sure when they were bought for Uist (in 2016 or thereabours) the weight was stated as being around 200kg. Either way the ones on Uist are much heavier than the Sweenys out there. Maybe the Uist Sweenys are so old that they've lost a lot of weight through being scraped along the rocks so many times!


Andy
 

Darien

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Highlander boats are OK. However if you want something that floats avoid Ferguson Marine. Even the Scottish Government won’t consider that option now and they own it.
 
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