How Do You Revitalise Old Wooden Reel Seat Inserts?

Lewis Chessman

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Hi, Folks.
As per the title, really. I have several old fly rods with rather dulled wooden inserts and I'm wondering how to bring the shine and lustre back to restore their beauty.
I've asked my old friend Mr. Sheen to assist but he's really not cutting the mustard despite several visits.

So, what would the wise men advise? Should I be using a furniture wax or perhaps a coat of varnish?
If wax, if varnish, if something else, any recommendations would be very much appreciated.

Thanks,
James.
 

JayP

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Hi, Folks.
As per the title, really. I have several old fly rods with rather dulled wooden inserts and I'm wondering how to bring the shine and lustre back to restore their beauty.
I've asked my old friend Mr. Sheen to assist but he's really not cutting the mustard despite several visits.

So, what would the wise men advise? Should I be using a furniture wax or perhaps a coat of varnish?
If wax, if varnish, if something else, any recommendations would be very much appreciated.

Thanks,
James.
James, it really depends on the wood and what finish was originally used but ny suggestion would be to clean with soap water, thoroughly dry and then buff with carnauba wax, the more coats the better the finish. You can get buffing wheels that will fit on a lathe, bench grinder or just a handheld drill, loads on ebay.
 

Lewis Chessman

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Thank you, Steven. Thank you Jason. I wonder how one decides which is more appropriate?

Jay, I see 'carnauba wax' in the form of car polish on eBay. Is that the kind of wax you mean?
I see too that it is also known as Brazil wax.
Is that what the salons use for Brazillians, too?
🤪
 

JayP

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Thank you, Steven. Thank you Jason. I wonder how one decides which is more appropriate?

Jay, I see 'carnauba wax' in the form of car polish on eBay. Is that the kind of wax you mean?
I see too that it is also known as Brazil wax.
Is that what the salons use for Brazillians, too?
🤪
Brazil wax, maybe 😂

You need this https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bolgers-...1mW78BqD_i2zBPj79WkKvGDpQTEKa7OMaAjm0EALw_wcB

And this

 

Lewis Chessman

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Thanks. I already have a wee Dremmel-type tool with buffing wheel bits, so that should take the elbow grease out of the job.
There's no way I can fit the butt section of, say, a 9 ft rod on my wee lathe. Presumably I can rub this wax stick on the insert, then buff?

I'm not discounting the walnut oil idea either and shall buy both to cover the bases.
 

JayP

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Thanks. I already have a wee Dremmel-type tool with buffing wheel bits, so that should take the elbow grease out of the job.
There's no way I can fit the butt section of, say, a 9 ft rod on my wee lathe. Presumably I can rub this wax stick on the insert, then buff?

I'm not discounting the walnut oil idea either and shall buy both to cover the bases.
It really depends on the wood when it comes to oils but if you want to go that route Birchwood Casey's Tru Oil covers most reel seat inserts and buffs really nicely.

Rub a light coat of wax into the wood, leave to dry then buff..
 

Mrtrout

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I used the walnut oil for years on my gun stock, it not only looks nice but it feeds the wood and puts a tiny bit of colour back.
It also smells divine, initially I’d give it a rub over three or four times with a day in between after that just do it at season ends before you hang your rods up.
S.
 

Lewis Chessman

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I've already purchased the wax and some walnut oil so I'll try them before the Tru Oil.

Last time I used walnut oil was when I was an aromatherapist. Its astringent qualities make it useful in anti-acne preparations. :)
If it's no good for the wood I'll put it in a salad! :)

Thanks, guys. I'll do 'before and after' photos and you'll be able to judge the results for yourselves. :)
 

aenoon

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I've already purchased the wax and some walnut oil so I'll try them before the Tru Oil.

Last time I used walnut oil was when I was an aromatherapist. Its astringent qualities make it useful in anti-acne preparations. :)
If it's no good for the wood I'll put it in a salad! :)

Thanks, guys. I'll do 'before and after' photos and you'll be able to judge the results for yourselves. :)
Dont use any mechanical dremmel type tools to clean the wood!
White spirit and 00/00 wire wool or the finest sand paper, just to take the stain colour off, nothing else.
Then try the walnut oil, or maybe linseed oil, as Mr T says. 3 or 4 times a day, letting it dry out totally, and then rub in again, after a week or so, wood should develop a high lustre/sheen.
 

Lewis Chessman

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Hi, Bert. My intention is to use a soft buffing wheel on the 'Dremmel' to polish the applied wax. Nothing abrasive.
Do you think that a bad idea?

I'll begin all this with my least favourite rods, that's for sure.
 

aenoon

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Hi, Bert. My intention is to use a soft buffing wheel on the 'Dremmel' to polish the applied wax. Nothing abrasive.
Do you think that a bad idea?

I'll begin all this with my least favourite rods, that's for sure.
Given is mechanical aid, revolving at high speed on to a turned cylyndrical piece of wood, yes could be a bad idea!
Far better buffing by hand, indeed, if the walnut/linseed oil approach works, will be no need for wax.
Google shotgun stock polishing, will give you an insight.
 

bobfly2

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Send a message to Terry at chestnutproducts.co.uk he is EXTREMELY knowledgeable about timber surface finishes. He is also very helpful and makes a huge range of products and has the correct sequences and processes and product compatabilities at his fingertips. No-one is likely to give better technical advice and he is renowned in the the world of woodturners in the UK and abroad.
 

bobfly2

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Send a message to Terry at chestnutproducts.co.uk he is EXTREMELY knowledgeable about timber surface finishes. He is also very helpful and makes a huge range of products and has the correct sequences and processes and product compatabilities at his fingertips. No-one is likely to give better technical advice and he is renowned in the the world of woodturners in the UK and abroad.
 

ohanzee

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Oil feeds wood and brings a deep natural colour back, coloured oils and sprit stains carry a colour that even out the colour, carnuba wax seals on the surface, carnuba is proper hard and protective, gives a glassy sheen.

Abrasives are often not needed, and its time consuming to refinish, unless trashed its better to gently scrub with meths, should come up a bit bleached looking which the oil then makes a deep colour, oil is its own finish, just a buff up, even if do take an original finish off its a lot quicker and easier to do it with a bit of methylene chloride and 0000 steel wool, saves scratching up the surface below.

The old trick with furniture was a rub with a cloth with a bit of naptha oil stain, a shade darker than you start with, it penetrates the finish and brings back a less dried out, nourished sort of hydrated finish, fresh again, ten mins to dry then buff up the original finish, that was half my wages back in the day.
 

JayP

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Send a message to Terry at chestnutproducts.co.uk he is EXTREMELY knowledgeable about timber surface finishes. He is also very helpful and makes a huge range of products and has the correct sequences and processes and product compatabilities at his fingertips. No-one is likely to give better technical advice and he is renowned in the the world of woodturners in the UK and abroad.
Terry is a great guy and has given me loads of advice on different finish for different woods. His buffing system is the best out there 👍
 

easker1

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when I did some french polishing at first I was using fine wire wool but minute bits were left in the wood especially Oak and there was tine y black marks, si I now use webrax synthetic and it leaves no marks and you can get it in 4 grades , Got mine from Axminster Power tools, easker1
 
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