How many rods do you take out?

suzuki15hp

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I take 2 10 foot rods assembled out in the boat. A 5 weight for dries and a 6 weight for wets. And at certain times of the year I'd have a dapping rod.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I can get a pulling rod, a nymphing rod, a dry fly rod and a dapping rod in one of those tubes for carrying posters...

 

JohnH

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One for chalkstream fishing and on small stillwaters; usually two on reservoirs whether from bank or boat. I might stretch to a third when reservoir boat fishing if it looks as though traditional wet fly fishing might be productive on the day.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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One in hand and one in the car as back up. Same with the reel after a memorial failure when a screw came out!

Ha-ha - the classic is when you have not clipped the spool in properly and when you cast it flies off and over the side of the boat and into the water and starts plummeting through the depths. So, you are sitting there, furiously hauling on the line... followed by the backing... to try and haul it up faster than it is spinning itself and spewing off the line... and then the backing. Eventually the diameter of the turns starts to narrow, and your hauling overtakes its spinning and you get it up. Then you are left to wind all the backing... and line... on without tangling all the coils lying at your feet... 🤪
 

Mies

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Hibernia
I can get a pulling rod, a nymphing rod, a dry fly rod and a dapping rod in one of those tubes for carrying posters...


Yep, same as that. Great on a dry day but not waterproof. Solved it by securing an old waterproof jacket sleeve with an elastic band over the extending end.
 

JoeOh

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Jun 29, 2020
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None....
Once. Turned up at the bank and realised that I left my trout rods at home. I did have a 13 foot salmon rod in the car for casting practise and got odd looks from fellow anglers, punching a minkie out, until a mate brought a spare rod for me.
Normally three rods on the boat, floating, and sinking lines plus predator rod for deep work.
 

running bear

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North County Dublin
Ha-ha - the classic is when you have not clipped the spool in properly and when you cast it flies off and over the side of the boat and into the water and starts plummeting through the depths. So, you are sitting there, furiously hauling on the line... followed by the backing... to try and haul it up faster than it is spinning itself and spewing off the line... and then the backing. Eventually the diameter of the turns starts to narrow, and your hauling overtakes its spinning and you get it up. Then you are left to wind all the backing... and line... on without tangling all the coils lying at your feet... 🤪
I had to do that with a full spey line and 200m of backing on a orvis LA6 as it headed downstream in a big spate. The spool lever is poorly designed, still use the reel but have it taped so not to open.
 

original cormorant

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Boat - one made up and another for emergency use in its tube, both with the same model of cassette reel.
Bank/shore - just one, plus at least one spare in the car.
Tropical boat - depends on how many rods my boat partner has, I'll make sure all the tubes on the boat are used.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Yep, same as that. Great on a dry day but not waterproof. Solved it by securing an old waterproof jacket sleeve with an elastic band over the extending end.

Aye, it's a bit prone to water ingress. I always make sure it is propped against the side of the boat, upside-down, so rain can't run inside the overlap. But I've been using the same one for well over 20 years now, and I'm used to its shortfalls, which are outweighed by all its advantages.

Col
 

red_tag

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North Lanarkshire
Usually just one with a spare in the car. Now I've started tubing I'll probably take both out with me, if I can find a rod holder for the spare.
 

Elwyman

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North Wales
Usually just one rod for river fishing, occasionally two if I'm fishing for sea trout at night. For salmon one rod with a shooting head lead line and various tips is all you need.
 

FluffChuck

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Jun 26, 2020
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Normally 2 rods on the elastic ties on my Bankman bag, saves shouldering the rod tubes and means I don't need to walk from bank to car or worse boat to car if I had a rod snap/failure.

8wt 9ft 6 for general all purpose fishing (I like a stout action!) and a 4wt 8ft for small waters or a more delicate presentation.

In honesty, I wish I'd gone for a 5wt as I find the 4wt a bit soft for my taste, but I think the setup makes the most sense as a 'cover all bases' arrangement.

Fluff
 

Spider

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May 25, 2006
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1 Rod only.

General rivers, 10ft 2 wt.

Small stream, 7.5ft 4 wt split cane.
 

eddleston123

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Nov 3, 2012
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Peebles, Scottish Borders
I only ever actually go fishing with one rod for trout. Usually a 9' 5#

I have about another five rods in the boot of the car for various purposes.
1 - a six piece rod, when I want to walk up the hills
2. - a four weight rod for summer/low water fishing
3. - a 10' rod for grayling fishing - I have now added an 11' 3#
4 - a spare 5# rod should I require in an emergency.



Douglas
 

Scotty Mitchell

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Jun 25, 2020
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The Kingdom of Fife
A back injury has ended my boat fishing, and I really miss it.
I would always have 3 and they’d be set up for Dries, lures and Nymphs.
That’s what I miss most about boat fishing, just taking everything you need/want with you.
 

Mrtrout

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Mar 21, 2008
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England.
Ha-ha - the classic is when you have not clipped the spool in properly and when you cast it flies off and over the side of the boat and into the water and starts plummeting through the depths. So, you are sitting there, furiously hauling on the line... followed by the backing... to try and haul it up faster than it is spinning itself and spewing off the line... and then the backing. Eventually the diameter of the turns starts to narrow, and your hauling overtakes its spinning and you get it up. Then you are left to wind all the backing... and line... on without tangling all the coils lying at your feet... 🤪
And praying you tied the backing on properly.
S.
 

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