how to distinguish my flies

Joined
Jun 28, 2020
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13
Location
Rutland
Hi everyone, just a question from a newbie on the forum and only been fly fishing for a month, how do i remember what flies are what.
I know the obvious, buzzers, daddies, lures, etc. but i'm struggling when it comes to all the different types of dries. I have a good selection as a starter and growing by the day!. It's what to use, and when. I know what they are when i buy them, but forget after a week or so. Is there any special way of remembering what fly to use and when. All i go by is what the local fishery suggests then buy what they recommend. Is this the way forward, and just try to remember as the years go by. Thanks for any hints or tips.
P.S. Not sure if i'm posting this in the right place:rolleyes:
 

Scotty Mitchell

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Jun 25, 2020
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The Kingdom of Fife
Just as you have with the other flies, get yourself familiar with a few dry patterns and when and how yo fish them, for example an emerger/shuttlecock buzzer, a Shipman's buzzer and a Hopper will catch in most stillwater situations. As you get to know the ropes from there you won't look back 👍
Keep looking in to the fly tying section on here too, you will see some of the best examples anywhere.
Tight lines and enjoy
 
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
13
Location
Rutland
thanks for that Scotty, i'm still finding my way around the forum. will definitely look in to fly tying section. and as for info. thanks again, and your profile pic. looks like a dream!!
 

ed_t

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Dec 21, 2014
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4,143
Thanks Bob, will look in to that too as have some Fulling Mill kit.
I'll second the fulling mill fly catalogue, also i'd suggest getting the book: "the pocket guide to matching the hatch" by lapsley & bennett.

I'm still dismal with fly pattern names but find general style/colour/size does ok for most dries.

Segregate your dries/wets/buzzers and nymphs, and always buy 3. Lose one, a good one that 10 fish destroy and you've still got one left to say i need more of them.

Keep your lures seperate as well.

You only need about 10 fly boxes.
 

wobbly face

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Not So Greater Manchester.
I used a note book and pen. Wrote down fly names and in order of where stored in the fly box.
You'll learn that you don't need a shed load of fly patterns. Bought a few books which helped with fly id and when to fish them. Biggest help was when In started tying my own flies but got carried away with too many patterns again. I even wrote down fly patterns that I found in magazines, seen at fisheries or was recommended. I'm cured of all that now, took forty years though. :rolleyes:
 

mrnotherone

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Jul 19, 2013
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You will probably find that you use a fraction of the patterns you buy. I wouldn't be surprised if 80% of all flies tied never get wet!

A handful of patterns will imitate a majority of common hatches. Don't worry too much about becoming an expert entomologist, but some basic knowledge is useful. For example, it's always good to know when to swap a large brown one for a small green one :)
 

BobP

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Oct 28, 2007
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Wiltshire
You will probably find that you use a fraction of the patterns you buy. I wouldn't be surprised if 80% of all flies tied never get wet!

A handful of patterns will imitate a majority of common hatches. Don't worry too much about becoming an expert entomologist, but some basic knowledge is useful. For example, it's always good to know when to swap a large brown one for a small green one :)
And then you get that day - maybe only once in ten years - when having the right fly in the right size makes the difference between catching a few fish and catching nothing while fish rise around you.
Last September I encountered that scenario of feeding and rising fish on a very low and clear river. A fly that had remained hidden and unused in my box since the summer of 1991 - 28 years - turned a dead day into a very good one.
 

mrnotherone

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And then you get that day - maybe only once in ten years - when having the right fly in the right size makes the difference between catching a few fish and catching nothing while fish rise around you.
Last September I encountered that scenario of feeding and rising fish on a very low and clear river. A fly that had remained hidden and unused in my box since the summer of 1991 - 28 years - turned a dead day into a very good one.
Nice one Bob, Lady Luck can struck at any time 🙂
 

BobP

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Location
Wiltshire
It was a CDC and hare dry fly on a size 20. I had tied 5 of them in my hotel room following a look round the River Wharfe in the lead in to the River National Final in 1991. I never used it on the day as we had a sudden spate in the afternoon. The flies remained hidden away in the fly box ever since until.......
 
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