How to do one of the most hypnotic tenkara presentations for surface-feeding fish (works on French leaders too)

Paul G

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I'm trying something new. Here is a complete description of a technique that has sky-rocketed our catches on days when conditions are suitable. You can also see some nice images of Italian wild brook trout too :)

What's the new thing?

Well, the video (and blog post link below it) are taken from a lesson that you'd normally have to be an email subscriber to get access to.

If you think it is bull - you are free to ignore the technique (or even better try it to prove it doesn't work); it is not for everyone and that is "A-OK".

For everyone else - here is how to (finally) be able to imitate that struggling fly, wasp or beetle that is glued to the surface film buzzing its wings like crazy to try to escape...

https://vimeo.com/179307218

Full lesson here:

Hypnotic Tenkara Fly Manipulation Technique
 
T

troutbum67

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Looks are very useful tactic , I imagine the lighter Tenkara rod ,plus the light fly go hand in hand .

Fly manipulation is a great way of catching fish in certain slacker pools , often the fly angler might only fish the usual hotspots ,both nymph pools and certainly less competent anglers my think the trout population is made up only of rising trout .

Often trout will live and seek there home in deeper water with a lower flow . Rivers with very heathy and abundant numbers of trout will have trout in all types of water .

During low river flows trout can be found in deep slack water , a example is the first pool in Otoubridge , on the footpath side , down from the weir , I think the fish on guys fished this pool before the floods of 2012 changed the pool .

The pool looks very slow , you first think the poll is shallow ,but often by wading through the pool you find the pool is deeper the it looks .

I find fly manipulation does work in these types of trout holding areas .

The proof is in the pudding ,as you and John seem to catch a very good amount of fish .
 

ohanzee

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That is a surprisingly simple and original neat trick that everyone is going to try, how could you not?
 

custard

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I've been giggling me rod top while dibbling for years but I'd not thought of tapping the rod.
I can foresee a generation of tenkara fishers with RSI in the index finger!


Andy
 

Paul G

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That is a surprisingly simple and original neat trick that everyone is going to try, how could you not?

In case you needed any further encouragement here's a short 'one that got away' report from Glenn in the blog comments...

Fished my favourite river in the Brecon Beacons recently. No rain for two weeks and the trout were sulking deep down in the stones and boulders.
The only way to get any interest was in manipulating the kebari.
Casting into the back eddy of a small waterfall I remembered Paul G mentioning this 'finger tapping' technique, he should have mentioned what can happen next.
After a few taps,a pause, few more taps, a huge trout detached itself from the bottom of the pool, covered the vertical five feet to my 'helpless kebari' in a split second and absolutely smashed into it, leaving me shocked, the kebari lying on the bank and the pool looking like a jacuzzi. A short but memorable experience.
 

JCP

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Thanks for video very enjoyable.Use a similar technique gleaned from my grandfather for traditional dry fly using conventional gear.Tapping the rod above the butt will transmit to a dry fly causing it to ''buzz'' on the surface.Can flick the switch sometimes.Works better with some patterns than others.On a calm surface can visibly see the ripples from the fly.

Best JP
 

Paul G

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That is fantastic J,

I really enjoy the way that these challenges have been met in all different fly fishing cultures around the globe. As I mention, there was a very similar thing that I did when fishing bead-heads on French leaders before I discovered tenkara at all.

I think there is some great satisfaction in seeking out the tools in the toolbox that make up the "complete angler" (or Compleat if your surname is Walton or Cotton :) )
 

ohanzee

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There is a clever bit of healthy evangelism going on here, these techniques are useful in 'normal' fly fishing so us Tenkara skeptics get interested, then inevitably we have to admit that they work even better with a real Tenkara set up and approach:D
 

Paul G

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Technique is fluid (and the boundaries leaky) between all the best methods in the world :)

Of course when you have kit purpose-designed for particular tactics, it makes it easy to get the best out of it (but not having that perfect kit doesn't prevent anyone from applying the techniques as long as the basic "physics" work).
 

Tangled

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OK, who's going to be the first to tape their girl's vibrator onto the handle?
 

lepirate

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Interesting technique. Reading books from the 18th and 19th century, prior to the reel gaining full support, it was often said that casting so that only the fly/flies touched the water with as little of the cast and line as possible was of paramount importance. Also often written was that some subtle manipulation of the rod, so that the fly was given a certain slight movement suggesting life, was important. This with a fixed line. If you look at the Piedmont angling traditions, still preserved in the region, fixed lines are used on mountain streams and lakes and the flies have a very close similarity to the kebari flies of Tenkara. I wonder if crews of trade ships from Venice/Genoa etc, many of whom would have used these angling methods, perhaps fished in Japan while waiting on cargo/weather and possibly spread European techniques. Perhaps we are seeing old European traditions, lost with the advent of the reel and silk lines, returning in the Japanese Tenkara methods...
Dave.
 

ohanzee

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Interesting technique. Reading books from the 18th and 19th century, prior to the reel gaining full support, it was often said that casting so that only the fly/flies touched the water with as little of the cast and line as possible was of paramount importance. Also often written was that some subtle manipulation of the rod, so that the fly was given a certain slight movement suggesting life, was important. This with a fixed line. If you look at the Piedmont angling traditions, still preserved in the region, fixed lines are used on mountain streams and lakes and the flies have a very close similarity to the kebari flies of Tenkara. I wonder if crews of trade ships from Venice/Genoa etc, many of whom would have used these angling methods, perhaps fished in Japan while waiting on cargo/weather and possibly spread European techniques. Perhaps we are seeing old European traditions, lost with the advent of the reel and silk lines, returning in the Japanese Tenkara methods...
Dave.

There seems to be a fresh appreciation of these subtleties that were once maybe core essentials, things that we have simply lost in our pursuit of modern marketed efficiency, and there is a simple purity and essence to them that some areas of fly fishing have lost, Tenkara seems to offer a return to an approach that has that functional yet aesthetic combination, a very Japanese thing that.
 

Tangled

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Well there's an admission I didn't expect:whistle:

I claim the patent, vibrating butt. (Does not include batteries).

1.0RVB.png
 

ohanzee

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I claim the patent, vibrating butt. (Does not include batteries).

1.0RVB.png

You do realise you just gifted your intellectual property rights to anyone that can get to a lawyer in the morning:eek:mg:

I hate the idea, I like the skilful tapping of the Tenkara expert, but it does qualify for a patent on novel function, and if it worked it would probably be banned in comps so probably highly a successful new fishing product.
 

Tangled

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You do realise you just gifted your intellectual property rights to anyone that can get to a lawyer in the morning:eek:mg:

Call it my gift to fishing - it's now public domain. Enjoy.

[no...not like that...]
 

tiggs

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Things were going slowly while retrieving my lake lure so I thought I would try tapping the handle of the rod as per video. The immediate response was a fish monstering my fly in a savage take . Only problem was, it only worked once and the next hour remained fishless!

Owen
 

ohanzee

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Things were going slowly while retrieving my lake lure so I thought I would try tapping the handle of the rod as per video. The immediate response was a fish monstering my fly in a savage take . Only problem was, it only worked once and the next hour remained fishless!

Owen

It will take more than an hour for that bit to unspook, try along a bit.
 
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