How to dry cdc flies

frenchflies

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Loon easy dry. Best stuff ever.
NymphesLaiton


Forget amadou and wizard powder. Those pellets are drying your fly in 3 shakes.

When u use powder, you lose it time afer time, with those pellets, no, they stay in the tube!

Amadou is good, but boring when weather is wet, and keeping water when you often dry your fly on it, making a sponge.

I never use grease on CDC's, because when you've caught a fish, grease is mixing with water, and the fly is harder to dry.It's not because grandpa told u to use grease that it's good to use grease.Grease is good for the first catch, after, it's useless.

I fish with no grease, but every time I catch a fish, I wash the CDC on the water to get rid of the mucus gluing the fly.

Rolling CDC (see marc petitjean method)give's a much better floatting property than tying a simple tuft on it.

Look how my fly are rolled, there's nearly a half circle when your eye is facing the fly, it gives more surface on the water, and the air is passing well through the fibers, so it's drying well!.
tfxihTp-fw2Bb1GFOMjo_w

You lose this useful surface when you're fishing by using a tuft (but it's also good because your fly looks like an emerger, but it's useless in fast water when you're searcing high floatting flies)
 

otter

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For a couple of seasons I used a camera film cannister with crushed Silica Gel crystals - dont crush it to a powder. Inexpensive....

Wash the fly after catching a trout, place fly (still attached to leader) in cannister , close lid loosely , couple of shakes and away you go.

Last season I used amadou and to be honest its far more efficient than any shake and vac style powdery stuff.

I still have the cannister, except now theres a couple of small holes in the lid and I use it to dry flys after use. Pop used fly in cannister and the silica gel will absorb all moisture from the fly.

My vote , Amadou by a long way.
 

frenchflies

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it's a joke? you mean a small hair drier with battery? Where can u find small stuff like that? If it's true, give me the website! I was thinking about a tiny hair drier, but I wasn't aware that it was possible...
 

tobesfish

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The BEST way to dry any fly is to get a rubber band and hook it over the fly and pull the band tight, as if you were about to catapult it. Hold on to the tippet and with the hand pulling the band give it a few strums. This will vibrate the fly at a few hundred Hz and remove all water without any of the crushing or squashing of patches or tree risk etc of false casting. I showed a friend this as it is possibly the most obvious thing in the world once you see it but so many people seem to have never come across it!

https://thelimpcobra.com/2014/04/11/drying-off-flies-with-a-rubber-band/
 

Wee Jimmy

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Just to add my 2 cents; I see someone suggests using gink. With CDC you should -never- use gink or any of the other floatant gels. They will do the opposite of what you are looking for. They will sink your fly same as if it was fully waterlogged.

You can use a desiccant, like shmazaki dry shake or loon's version of it.

PdenB

Yeah really.....I wouldn't recommend anything to anyone if it didn't work, even on a seven year old thread....:rolleyes:

If you administer the gink in the manner I described i.e very,very sparingly on cdc feathers which have been buff dried with amadou or towel...you will find it reproofs your fly perfectly.
 

sewinbasher

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The BEST way to dry any fly is to get a rubber band and hook it over the fly and pull the band tight, as if you were about to catapult it. Hold on to the tippet and with the hand pulling the band give it a few strums. This will vibrate the fly at a few hundred Hz and remove all water without any of the crushing or squashing of patches or tree risk etc of false casting. I showed a friend this as it is possibly the most obvious thing in the world once you see it but so many people seem to have never come across it!

https://thelimpcobra.com/2014/04/11/drying-off-flies-with-a-rubber-band/
I was shown this a few seasons back and it works well for drying a waterlogged fly but for drying out a cdc after catching a fish I find the best policy is to change the fly, then wash the old one thoroughly, squeeze in amadou, twang it on the rubber band, Frog's Fanny it and then stick it your patch for next time.
 

wobbly face

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I have tried the rubber band trick, but the band snapped too easily and I found it didn't do that much better than a blow dry, squeeze in amadou and decadent powder. One trick that I do now, I use a little brush for cleaning electric shavers. Just comb out the fibres as I've found that even decadent can get clog up in the fibres and they get matted. I've caught literally a dozen plus fish before having to change flies due to losing cdc fibres. I also strip the fibres from the stalks when using cdc, seems to make the fibres easier to clean and also makes the fly lighter.

Didn't realise this thread was 7 years old.
 

tobesfish

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The band breaking would suggest more that you're using a weak band (hence it not working properly) rather than the method not being effective!
 

LDO

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For brutally short spring hatches a very quick solution to this problem can make all the difference between a couple of fish and half a dozen. A few quite violent twangs with a strong elastic band will get the fly back out there pronto . It won't float quite as well after the first fish but it usually doesn't have to be sitting perfectly when the fish are really on. Seconds can count in dryfly fishing.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Just to add my 2 cents; I see someone suggests using gink. With CDC you should -never- use gink or any of the other floatant gels. They will do the opposite of what you are looking for. They will sink your fly same as if it was fully waterlogged.

I've fished with Jimmy and I've seen him using Gink on CDC and I've seen them float like corks after, so what you say simply isn't true. It just needs done in the right way by someone who knows what he's doing. Check the description Jimmy gives for how to do it and learn something. ;)

Col
 

steve collyer

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I thought the whole point of cdc was it was the miracle feather that needed no treatment to float. I may as well use any cheap feather if I have to resort to smothering it in floatant.
Cdc use is based on a false premise. It's the single most over rated aspect of modern fly fishing.
Deer hair is a far superior material in my opinion.
 

Wee Jimmy

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I thought the whole point of cdc was it was the miracle feather that needed no treatment to float. I may as well use any cheap feather if I have to resort to smothering it in floatant.
Cdc use is based on a false premise. It's the single most over rated aspect of modern fly fishing.
Deer hair is a far superior material in my opinion.

There are so many misconceptions regarding cdc....no floatant required seems to be the most popular one. The cdc feather with all those micro barbules is designed to hold the birds preen oil. This same structure also means it has a large surface area which lends itself to floating on the surface as long as it remains dry. However once it becomes wetted through having lost its waterproofing or after catching a fish, it will sink.

I treat my cdc with floatant to retard the wetting process.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I thought the whole point of cdc was it was the miracle feather that needed no treatment to float.

I think that is a misconception that a lot of people have. CDC doesn't have any special buoyancy or waterproofing - it's just keratin, same as any feather. What makes it better at floating is its structure...


The microfibres have a potential to trap air. They are also presenting a huge surface area to the surface tension of the water. However, trapping air and sticking to the surface tension is dependent on not 'wetting'. If the surface 'wets' (loses its surface tension with water), it doesn't trap air, and doesn't resist penetrating the surface tension. Therefore, it helps to apply a waterproof coating. It's not 'floatant', in that it is not trying to increase buoyancy - it's painting as thin a layer as possible (ideally one molecule thick) of water-repellant coating on to the surface to make the surface hydrophobic. This can be anything that adds a hydrophobic layer, such as fumed silica (non rip-off Frog's Fanny) or gel or oil.

Some folk have it cracked and get on well with CDCs. Some folk have never cracked it and don't get on well with CDCs - and so they use deer hair or boot lace core or whatever. That's fine. No one is saying everyone needs CDCs - it's more a case of trying to point out what the secret to success is. :)

(Round about now, someone usually comes in and says you don't need to use anything with CDCs, and they float all day without any maintenance. :whistle:)

Col

---------- Post added at 12:16 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:12 PM ----------

There are so many misconceptions regarding cdc...

Ye beat me in by 2 minutes. :p
 
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