Hugh Falkus "sea trout fishing"

nick d

Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2020
Messages
14
Location
south wales
he also did the salmon book.
One thing i can say about the sea trout book is he states in it that if its not dark not to go near the water, wait until its pitch black. i usually cant wait and have caught sea trout, so i think that bit is abit bertie. very good book though
 

LukeNZ

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2017
Messages
3,147
Location
Hawke’s Bay, NZ
Have you read Steff's book, compared the content with Falkus?

Yes, a sea trout is still a sea trout and they way you fish may be the same and will undoubtedly still 'work' but ideas and methods expand and change.

....many ways of doing the same thing. Each can do well on its day,

if it’s just consistency and numbers we all want, find a nice river and use euro nymph techniques. With a bit of knowledge it’s pretty easy to sometimes hook good numbers - I lost interest quite quickly on it.

Most of us (once past a certain point in our fishing lives) just prefer the method we like irrespective of volume - we could all catch more, but there is not much point if we are simply returning them, and we are already happy with our lot.

I like my method (Spey - two handed / trout spey), because I enjoy the process, love my rods and reels, love being stood in the river swinging my own flies - that are not patterns you can buy; developed over time quite random flies - for me and my method. I refine them - then try another idea, to see if It can catch like the last creations.

I generally catch less than I could, though I am happy with my average of around one fish per outing, of 2-3 hours. just around my local spots. I certainly don’t want to fish like Hugh Falkus or anyone else anymore, not unless they happen to fish just like I do..

On full day/multi day fishing jaunts to special places (for me, the Tongariro) I will mix it up and we occasionally get into double figures. After 3 or 4 fish in an hour, I am inclined to stop fishing and do other stuff around the waters edge - check under stones wander around a bend I have never been around, I don’t feel the need to catch any more that day, and a few drams of whiskey seem to cap those days off very nicely.

I only tend to take a few prime ones for the smoker - but only if I am close to home, so they can be processed to the highest possible standard. The fish deserve that.

🙃
 

loxie

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2016
Messages
908
he also did the salmon book.
One thing i can say about the sea trout book is he states in it that if its not dark not to go near the water, wait until its pitch black. i usually cant wait and have caught sea trout, so i think that bit is abit bertie. very good book though
The Cumbrian Esk, where he learnt to sea trout fish and did most of his fishing is extremely clear and this probably explains his need for full dark. Most sea trout rivers have a bit of colour and can be approached a bit earlier.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
2,267
Location
South Northants
That's my point Luke.

Falkus's book presents a pretty narrow view of sea trout fishing, it is predominantly focussed on the night time activity and in his own words . . . "it is in the darkness that we are most likely to be successful, sport by day (certainly with fly or spinner) being confined usually to those times when the water is high." . . . he is fairly dismissive of daytime fly fishing. "At this point, I suppose, we ought to say something about dry fly fishing. It will not be much, because I don't know much about it."

Change is constant, the river changes and what we want from our fishing changes over time too. This is true with all aspects of fishing and sea trout fishing is no different. I used to be obsessed with sea trout and read Falkus first. However, my sea trout fishing was on the Teifi and much of what I read didn't ring true, whereas Harris and Morgan did, as did Jonathon Jones Sea Trout articles in the 'old' Trout Fisherman. Falkus was dismissive of Tube Flies and doesn't mention Waddingtons - I found their use and combination transformed my fishing. Steff's book talks about seeking sea trout with French Leaders, Klink and Dink etc etc. Stuff moves on, whether we choose to pick up on it is a different matter.

However, change is more fundamental, you talk of your delight using your switch rod etc. I used to spend many happy days dragging lead lines and budgerigars around reservoirs - I loved it, caught some great fish, loved the challenge of the method. But we change, what we want changes and remembering 'special' fish reinforces this. At 7.30am on the morning of my 60th birthday, I walked 20ft from my tent, knelt down and cast a small dry fly with a 7ft cane rod and silk line that my wife had gifted me. After a short tussle, I landed a 12" fish - hugely more satisfying than my pb brownie of 14lb.
 

micka

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2010
Messages
1,066
That's my point Luke.

Falkus's book presents a pretty narrow view of sea trout fishing, it is predominantly focussed on the night time activity and in his own words . . . "it is in the darkness that we are most likely to be successful, sport by day (certainly with fly or spinner) being confined usually to those times when the water is high." . . . he is fairly dismissive of daytime fly fishing. "At this point, I suppose, we ought to say something about dry fly fishing. It will not be much, because I don't know much about it."

Change is constant, the river changes and what we want from our fishing changes over time too. This is true with all aspects of fishing and sea trout fishing is no different. I used to be obsessed with sea trout and read Falkus first. However, my sea trout fishing was on the Teifi and much of what I read didn't ring true, whereas Harris and Morgan did, as did Jonathon Jones Sea Trout articles in the 'old' Trout Fisherman. Falkus was dismissive of Tube Flies and doesn't mention Waddingtons - I found their use and combination transformed my fishing. Steff's book talks about seeking sea trout with French Leaders, Klink and Dink etc etc. Stuff moves on, whether we choose to pick up on it is a different matter.

However, change is more fundamental, you talk of your delight using your switch rod etc. I used to spend many happy days dragging lead lines and budgerigars around reservoirs - I loved it, caught some great fish, loved the challenge of the method. But we change, what we want changes and remembering 'special' fish reinforces this. At 7.30am on the morning of my 60th birthday, I walked 20ft from my tent, knelt down and cast a small dry fly with a 7ft cane rod and silk line that my wife had gifted me. After a short tussle, I landed a 12" fish - hugely more satisfying than my pb brownie of 14lb.
I don't do much night fishing for sea trout nowadays - I think stepping on the top section of one of my favourite rods (and hearing that horrible cracking sound) as I was putting tackle away in the dark last time out had a deterrent effect. But that certainly sounds like a book worth reading Paul.

Thanks

Mick
 

taffy1

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 26, 2014
Messages
11,836
Location
Well within my comfort zone
Have you read Steff's book, compared the content with Falkus?

Yes, a sea trout is still a sea trout and the way you fish may be the same and will undoubtedly still 'work' but ideas and methods expand and change.
No I haven't read his book & I'm sure he has many constructive approaches to sea run brownies but, if it isn't broken.....why?
 

taffy1

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 26, 2014
Messages
11,836
Location
Well within my comfort zone
Totally agree, but if something tried & tested on your own waters work for you, would you try to repair something that isn't "broken"? Yes Falkus was impressing his tactics on anglers on other waters & yet he stated often enough that nothing in angling was written in stone. His divisions of night fishing are ringing true with todays authors.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
2,267
Location
South Northants
Totally agree, but if something tried & tested on your own waters work for you, would you try to repair something that isn't "broken"?

Fish and chips 'works' for me but I don't have it every meal and it's the same in fishing. For me, repeatedly doing something, because it works, becomes tedious, predictable and I become bored by the lack of 'adventure'.
 

taffy1

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 26, 2014
Messages
11,836
Location
Well within my comfort zone
Fish and chips 'works' for me but I don't have it every meal and it's the same in fishing. For me, repeatedly doing something, because it works, becomes tedious, predictable and I become bored by the lack of 'adventure'.
Wouldn't manage a 5 hour night-time session on my local then., as I said in my previous post, "tried & tested on my own waters" still applies, Steff hasn't fished here. (For reasons not realeased...naughty boy!)
 

3lbgrayling

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
31,783
Location
Central Scotland
Some folk just can't get a handle on night fishing for S/Trout-Trout.Or they just get spooked by the whole thing.they are best tucked up in bed. It is a brilliant way to understand your inner self.

Jim
 

3lbgrayling

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
31,783
Location
Central Scotland
I can't at this time tell you what year.The river was very low.A few fish were spashing about.but they were not in the mood.I had a very close call with an otter.But the best bit was when myself, SJ.and, dave. just sat/ lay on the bank and watched the Pershid shower.It was magic. I had a pint wiht Gethyn earlier that. night.When we got back to Cothies house that night we got very pissed.

Jim
 

LukeNZ

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2017
Messages
3,147
Location
Hawke’s Bay, NZ
That's my point Luke.

Falkus's book presents a pretty narrow view of sea trout fishing, it is predominantly focussed on the night time activity and in his own words . . . "it is in the darkness that we are most likely to be successful, sport by day (certainly with fly or spinner) being confined usually to those times when the water is high." . . . he is fairly dismissive of daytime fly fishing. "At this point, I suppose, we ought to say something about dry fly fishing. It will not be much, because I don't know much about it."

Change is constant, the river changes and what we want from our fishing changes over time too. This is true with all aspects of fishing and sea trout fishing is no different. I used to be obsessed with sea trout and read Falkus first. However, my sea trout fishing was on the Teifi and much of what I read didn't ring true, whereas Harris and Morgan did, as did Jonathon Jones Sea Trout articles in the 'old' Trout Fisherman. Falkus was dismissive of Tube Flies and doesn't mention Waddingtons - I found their use and combination transformed my fishing. Steff's book talks about seeking sea trout with French Leaders, Klink and Dink etc etc. Stuff moves on, whether we choose to pick up on it is a different matter.

However, change is more fundamental, you talk of your delight using your switch rod etc. I used to spend many happy days dragging lead lines and budgerigars around reservoirs - I loved it, caught some great fish, loved the challenge of the method. But we change, what we want changes and remembering 'special' fish reinforces this. At 7.30am on the morning of my 60th birthday, I walked 20ft from my tent, knelt down and cast a small dry fly with a 7ft cane rod and silk line that my wife had gifted me. After a short tussle, I landed a 12" fish - hugely more satisfying than my pb brownie of 14lb.

Falkus, I feel was at the stage when he wrote his Sea Trout tome, to where he is simply fishing the way it suits him. Certainly people will have a way of sea trout fishing that is much different, and they are free to prefer, practice and develop their own theme on that. Falkus put into print what he likes. And, that is to what I was alluding, with my choice of what pleases me. I could probably write a treatise of trout spey in Maori land, and inspire quite a few people to try it, and love it - but it certainly doesn’t make me the oracle, nor any better at it. So neither should Falkus be considered an oracle for sea trout fishing for the telling his sea trout story.
The fish I catch my way, and presumably Falkus catching his way; is like your fish above, your way - with cane and silk. My way blinkers me to yours, and Falkus’s, because I am long invested down my preferred path, in the same way I could not switch to supporting soccer, or a soccer team, though it doesn’t prevent me admiring an overhead scissor kick into the goal; and nor make me want to kick a soccer ball.
 

riu123

Active member
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
28
A long time ago I went to a talk and film show by Hugh Falkus, it was a great night, and at the time he was very well known, he was one of the very lucky anglers who had a private bit of river to fish.
Of course the talk didn't end there, it was an outlet to sell his book, and I think most people in the room bought one including myself, and it was signed by the man his self, I still read bits of it today even though i've had it for a lot of years.
 

micka

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2010
Messages
1,066
Some folk just can't get a handle on night fishing for S/Trout-Trout.Or they just get spooked by the whole thing.they are best tucked up in bed. It is a brilliant way to understand your inner self.

Jim
One guy in a club I used to be a member of was night fishing the Liddle with a friend. His friend gave up after little success and headed back to the cottage they were staying in. The guy in question fished on but slipped on a bankside rock and broke his ankle. He spent the rest of the night in agony trying to scramble up the bank back to his car, or, rather where he could at least pick up a signal again for his phone to call for his mate to get medical help.

So I would add one thing to what you say Jim, that you don't have to be tripping over each other but it makes sense to always fish with someone else and finish with at least one other angler and never alone.

For my own part as the years added up I found a lengthy night session left me something akin to being jet lagged the next day, which I pretty much had to write off in terms of doing anything. But when the fish were "on" it could be incredibly exciting.

Mick
 

Bawnbrack

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2020
Messages
6
A drunk and a philanderer with a vicious edge to his tongue - yes, just a normal guy that loves the outdoors.

He did write a good book but let's not eulogise him.
He was a bit of an old shagger (known as Huge Phallus by the BBC doc team he worked with) but his knowledge, particularly of Sea Trout, is unsurpassed.
 

Latest posts

Top