Hull color: Does it matter for Stillwater fishing?

bgooch

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For those who find the Coulam doesn't drift well, any insights as to why?

I ask only for insights into what makes a "good" drift boat.

Cheers,

Bryan
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Yeh - they don't have many fans. Drift very poorly.

Should I write and tell Mr Coulam? 🤭

Col

Yes, tell him to get the original moulds off Sweeneys at Lomond and start making them!
I guess we all want slightly different things from out boats but the original Sweeneys were perfect for small to meduim lochs my eyes.
Those Heyland boats that appeared to come out of the same mould as the Sweeneys were not well liked by the S. Uist ghillies. They were much heavier than the originals and were slow to turn. Spinning them round on the oars, when you had old stiff anglers with fish running off upwind, was hard work and they were sods to refloat single handed when the lochs dropped. Also the middle seat has a bloody great bouyancy tank under it so you can't stretch your legs when on the oars (or put your dog under there). On the other hand being heavier they did appear to drift a bit nicer in big winds.

Andy
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Those Heyland boats that appeared to come out of the same mould as the Sweeneys were not well liked by the S. Uist ghillies.
I got the impression the Heyland boats were from the same mould as Sweeneys? I think the only one I fished from was the one on Grogarry. I could see it wasn't identical - I couldn't fit both the petrol and the leccy onto the transom - whereas I can on a Sweeney. I can't remember feeling it was different from a Sweeney? Interesting, though... we have Sweeneys on our loch and one is getting very mothy and will need replaced before long. We had been eyeing up a Heyland. The big 18 ft Sweeneys some of the Lomond boys have are superb boats (as 'Tupperware' boats go 🤭 ) - dunno if they are still available...


Other Lomond boys have these Irish-made boats...


They are pretty good too.

Hard to beat one of these...


Col
 

easker1

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Highlands
our club bought some Uist boats a few years back , I found them fine , but some members didn't like them on the bigger open lochs, but the construction wasn't great when we had to repair them, more filler than Fibre glass, but shape wise they were fine, we have one left but it needs repair,the club has mainly opted for The Pioner Bath tubs, easker1
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I ask only for insights into what makes a "good" drift boat.
Top priority for me is that with 2 anglers who weigh roughly the same, one in either end, it should drift straight ahead without needing a drogue out and then adjusted to make it drift straight. They usually drift stern-first, as the bow makes them 'pip-shaped', so it is like squeezing an apple pip out your fingers. However, some manage to keep not a bad line, while others drift at a 45 degree angle to the wind... or even worse!

Col

PS: These boats are particularly 'pip-shaped' and consequently are atrocious drifters...

 
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Cap'n Fishy

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...,the club has mainly opted for The Pioner Bath tubs, easker1
😲😲😲😲 You have to be kidding!





They really are Tupperware! They are utterly impossible to get to drift slow or straight without a drogue out. They have so little draught they spin round and round like a top, and then they fly off down the water at a rate of knots. The seating arrangement is dreadful as well. However, the worst thing about Pioners is that they are nigh-on impossible to sink by throwing a huge rock into them from a height!

But good luck with them! (y)

Col
 

bobmiddlepoint

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I got the impression the Heyland boats were from the same mould as Sweeneys? I think the only one I fished from was the one on Grogarry. I could see it wasn't identical - I couldn't fit both the petrol and the leccy onto the transom - whereas I can on a Sweeney. I can't remember feeling it was different from a Sweeney?
Col
I'm sure they are out of the same mould but they are heavier. The difference in the feel is probably down to the different way we use the boats. You are two up and use electric power for drift correction whereas I was three up and doing properly with the oars! Once you had them up to speed going with the wind on the oars they were like oil tankers to get them to turn on the oars compared to Sweeneys.

I guess what somebody needs to do if we are ever to have a really good drifter is design a boat to go sideways through the water rather than one designed to go forwards!
I once used one old thing on Uist that was almost as pointy at the stern as the bow. It would drift in a series of alternate 45 degree tacks. The thing was it averaged out as straight if you just left it alone and didn't try to correct it, a bit like the steering on a Landrover...

I have been very lucky in that I'd never sat in a Pioner until last year. I used one of the estate ones on L. Naver and it was worse than I expected! On the other hand we have them on the river simply for crossing over in high water and they are brilliant for this. The very shallow draught means you never hit rocks and can actually row up minor rapids (in moderate flows). But they should never be allowed on lochs.


Andy
 

Wee Jimmy

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Top priority for me is that with 2 anglers who weigh roughly the same, one in either end, it should drift straight ahead without needing a drogue out and then adjusted to make it drift straight. They usually drift stern-first, as the bow makes them 'pip-shaped', so it is like squeezing an apple pip out your fingers. However, some manage to keep not a bad line, while others drift at a 45 degree angle to the wind... or even worse!

Col

PS: These boats are particularly 'pip-shaped' and consequently are atrocious drifters...

Have you any “floating fanny” shots in your archives Col....it was a nice drifter.
 

bobmiddlepoint

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our club bought some Uist boats a few years back , I found them fine , but some members didn't like them on the bigger open lochs, but the construction wasn't great when we had to repair them, more filler than Fibre glass, but shape wise they were fine, we have one left but it needs repair,the club has mainly opted for The Pioner Bath tubs, easker1
It is telling that the only remaining Uist built boats on Uist have flowers growing in them!
The rest are just bits strewn around the loch shores.


Andy
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Eye...




Boardhouse...


Good for drifting straight. Not so good for mounting a petrol and a leccy motor on! 🤭

Col
 

easker1

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Points
48
Location
Highlands
😲😲😲😲 You have to be kidding!





They really are Tupperware! They are utterly impossible to get to drift slow or straight without a drogue out. They have so little draught they spin round and round like a top, and then they fly off down the water at a rate of knots. The seating arrangement is dreadful as well. However, the worst thing about Pioners is that they are nigh-on impossible to sink by throwing a huge rock into them from a height!

But good luck with them! (y)

Col
Insurance Col? plus they are self bailers, not my choice but we have to have 3rd party insurance at the very least , we also have 2 Longliners and a Scandinavian boat which is very good but the thwarts are very low so I carry a lump of foam to sit on, easker1
 

easker1

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Location
Highlands
We have insurance and Sweeney boats. What's the problem?

I would almost rather not fish than fish in a Pioner.

Col
an Executive Decision Col. plus the selfbailing option, some of our boats are way in the wild accessible only by 4wd,that I don't have,the option here for those who know would be Loch Maree Clinker built boats, but the builder is long Dead, and the boats are impossible to find, so we are stuck with the Pioner 15ft, as you say a B#gger to be in, a b#gger to Row, and terrible to fish in,but having said that , I prefer them to The Orkney Longliner, unless there are 5 people in it to keep it down in the water,It's a case of which boat will stand not being looked after for days on end and unfortunately it's the Pioner,no easy answers for our club,
easker1
 

Cap'n Fishy

Well-known member
Points
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Location
Embra
an Executive Decision Col. plus the selfbailing option, some of our boats are way in the wild accessible only by 4wd,that I don't have,the option here for those who know would be Loch Maree Clinker built boats, but the builder is long Dead, and the boats are impossible to find, so we are stuck with the Pioner 15ft, as you say a B#gger to be in, a b#gger to Row, and terrible to fish in,but having said that , I prefer them to The Orkney Longliner, unless there are 5 people in it to keep it down in the water,It's a case of which boat will stand not being looked after for days on end and unfortunately it's the Pioner,no easy answers for our club,
easker1
I can appreciate the indestructibility of them, if they have to be left out in the wilds for long periods. It's a pity someone doesn't take the useful aspects of them and make a decent drifting boat with them.

Col
 
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