im buying a boat

doobrysnatcher

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Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
2,999
Location
ireland
My take on fins... your mileage may vary.
Back in the days of the B&H world championships a lot of men hereabouts fitted fins to their boats along with big engines. The engines were set to shallowish drive and as such pushed the stern of the boat down in the water. (You can mimic this any time on any glass boat, just lift the engine a couple of clicks, open it up and watch the stern drop.) With the big engines this brought water in over the back. The fin was to lift the boat onto something approaching a plane preventing this ingress. The theory was that the boat would ride higher and get to the fishing quicker. They were all unstable. I watched a Dromore team member on Lough Erne with a 25 horse engine take his boat off the top of a big wave and straight into the face of the next. He drilled into it like a submarine. Completely swamped and lost a lot of kit. Oh how we laughed, once we realised he hadn't died. I don't remember the last time I saw anyone use one up here. Some guys still use big fins on their outboards but that's a different thing. In my opinion fins are definitely dangerous at speed in a wave. Larry McAlinden told me every Irish glass boat apart from the twin keel ones is descended from the first two molds that Burkes took off larch Philbins. They are meant to be displacement hulls.

BTW, looking at the pictures of your DC's thwart. If you ever wanted to use a leecie off the stern those quarter knees are too high. You would either have to hang it on the side or add a riser later. Think about getting the port side of the transom lifted to accomodate a leccie engines clamp. It's worth it.
Maciia, is that a McA Anglers Delight? Straightest drifting boat I ever sat in.
The video makes me want to get back into comps again, not sure the liver could take it though.

S.
in english, the body supports (THWARTS) athe back of the boat( STERN) that uses a bracket (QUARTERKNEE) that joins the (GUNWALES) reinforced wooden top of the (HULL) body to the (TRANSOM) back of the boat onthe left side should be raised to support an electric engine ,is this correct?
im learning the lingo slowly
 

blue diamond

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
248
in english, the body supports (THWARTS) athe back of the boat( STERN) that uses a bracket (QUARTERKNEE) that joins the (GUNWALES) reinforced wooden top of the (HULL) body to the (TRANSOM) back of the boat onthe left side should be raised to support an electric engine ,is this correct?
im learning the lingo slowly
In my understanding of boats the thwarts are your seats running across the boat from one gunnel to the opposite one, it's the top of the transom above the knees you need the height extension on the port side ie left side as you sit in boat
 

splinters

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Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
1,792
Location
Co. Armagh.
Sorry Doobry, I suffered a mind fart yesterday. You're correct, it's the transom which carries a riser block for the leccie engine. As blue diamond pointed out above, the thwarts are a crossbrace which supports the beam of the boat. In our case the seats fulfill the function. I should have been clearer. Dunno why I wrote thwarts. I'll blame the drink.
S.
 

suzuki15hp

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 31, 2017
Messages
1,236
My take on fins... your mileage may vary.
Back in the days of the B&H world championships a lot of men hereabouts fitted fins to their boats along with big engines. The engines were set to shallowish drive and as such pushed the stern of the boat down in the water. (You can mimic this any time on any glass boat, just lift the engine a couple of clicks, open it up and watch the stern drop.) With the big engines this brought water in over the back. The fin was to lift the boat onto something approaching a plane preventing this ingress. The theory was that the boat would ride higher and get to the fishing quicker. They were all unstable. I watched a Dromore team member on Lough Erne with a 25 horse engine take his boat off the top of a big wave and straight into the face of the next. He drilled into it like a submarine. Completely swamped and lost a lot of kit. Oh how we laughed, once we realised he hadn't died. I don't remember the last time I saw anyone use one up here. Some guys still use big fins on their outboards but that's a different thing. In my opinion fins are definitely dangerous at speed in a wave. Larry McAlinden told me every Irish glass boat apart from the twin keel ones is descended from the first two molds that Burkes took off larch Philbins. They are meant to be displacement hulls.

BTW, looking at the pictures of your DC's thwart. If you ever wanted to use a leecie off the stern those quarter knees are too high. You would either have to hang it on the side or add a riser later. Think about getting the port side of the transom lifted to accomodate a leccie engines clamp. It's worth it.
Maciia, is that a McA Anglers Delight? Straightest drifting boat I ever sat in.
The video makes me want to get back into comps again, not sure the liver could take it though.

S.
Some good points there. Thanks.

The size/weight of the outboard engine is a big factor.

Where lake boats have been put through the CE approval procedure, for a particular design, it's the maximum weight of the outboard engine that is specified for installation on the transom, and not the maximum horse power. I believe this is where the issue of using outboard engines which are heavier than the design maximum resulted in the use of rear fins.

Another reason for me looking at removing my fins, is that I think they are the wrong design anyway, if they were to be fitted to a boat with a planing hull. All the proprietary fins I've looked at are on a single level plane, with raising and lowering adjustment available to suit the trim for different speeds.

The fins on my boat almost mirror the the shape of a mini hull section, with a gap in the centre for the outboard engine shaft. It's my opinion, and it's only an opinion at this stage, that my fins adversely affect the roll on my boat when I have to cut through the waves at an angle, instead of head on. Also, going in reverse at any speed appears to drag the aft end of the boat down, and I'm sure this is due to the fins.

I've looked at many lake boats fitted with fins over the years, and I can't recall any which are on a simple flat horizontal plane sticking out from the stern.

I'll post photographs of my fins later when I'm next down at my boat.
 

suzuki15hp

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 31, 2017
Messages
1,236
Some good points there. Thanks.

The size/weight of the outboard engine is a big factor.

Where lake boats have been put through the CE approval procedure, for a particular design, it's the maximum weight of the outboard engine that is specified for installation on the transom, and not the maximum horse power. I believe this is where the issue of using outboard engines which are heavier than the design maximum resulted in the use of rear fins.

Another reason for me looking at removing my fins, is that I think they are the wrong design anyway, if they were to be fitted to a boat with a planing hull. All the proprietary fins I've looked at are on a single level plane, with raising and lowering adjustment available to suit the trim for different speeds.

The fins on my boat almost mirror the the shape of a mini hull section, with a gap in the centre for the outboard engine shaft. It's my opinion, and it's only an opinion at this stage, that my fins adversely affect the roll on my boat when I have to cut through the waves at an angle, instead of head on. Also, going in reverse at any speed appears to drag the aft end of the boat down, and I'm sure this is due to the fins.

I've looked at many lake boats fitted with fins over the years, and I can't recall any which are on a simple flat horizontal plane sticking out from the stern.

I'll post photographs of my fins later when I'm next down at my boat.
These are proprietary fins which would be fitted either side of an out board on a planing hull. The slight upturn on the flat plate is there purely to stop the plate flexing when in use
1599731221067.png1599731221067.png
 

splinters

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
1,792
Location
Co. Armagh.
×Doobs, here's what I meant about transom risers. I fitted this myself from a lump of sapele a couple of years after getting the boat. As you can see getting the maker to do it would be a lot tidier. The big advantage of using a leccie on the transom is you can steer properly. Mounted on the side just doesn't work well.
transom 1.jpgtransom 2.jpg
Anyway, just something to consider.
S.
 
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