I'm officially on me holidays and I need a book, can you help please ?

corto maltese

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That's it, all the works done and I've got two whole weeks off, hurrah !
Not going far this year but I'm gonna need book or three to help me relax.
Fly fishing g subjects would be my top choice, I've read a shedload recommended on here but I'm open to all suggestions.
Even non flyfishing suggestions would be good, I'm doing a kindle thing so the arcane/ interesting stuff wouldn't work unfortunately.
As I said, I'm widely but not well read so I imagine I've already eaten all the usual subjects, john G and company, but what the hell if you liked it, I probably will too :D
C' Mon , spill the beans, what did you read that really floated your boat ?, I'm all ears !!!
Thanks in advance Mates and Happy Holliday's
:thumbs:
 

beryl

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Going Fishing. Negley Farson. This chap is a superb wordsmith and an adventurer who is obsessed by Fishing. It’s also got superb line-drawn illustrations.
 

beryl

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Just to add, cheap as chips on eBay but do get a good sized version so the drawings get their proper outing....
 

Vermontdrifter

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Speaking as an anglo-saxon also married to a French woman you should read, « 1000 years of annoying the French », by Stephen Clarke. Make sure that SWMBO sees the title several times!

Take care

Terry
 

Lewis Chessman

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'Going Fishing' is my favourite angling book and as beryl says, the illustrations (Tunnicliffe) are beautiful. Well worth getting!

Funnily enough, I was just about to post suggesting you try one of Farson's novels, 'The Story of a Lake'. It's not a fishing book at all but an engaging novel. Tbh, it took me a couple of chapters before I warmed to it but was then hooked. I won't write about the plot but will say that it was a rather haunting, captivating read, the mood of which hung over me during the time I read it.

If it's fishy stuff you want try any R.C. Bridgett or Cecil Braithwaite, two inter-war writers of some charm relating their exploits with a rod in a by-gone age.
I also enjoyed Stephen Johnson's 'Fishing From Afar', written while a POW in Germany. The man fished on Skye and invented the Camasunary Killer. Good tales of moonlight salmon fishing in the shadow of the Cuillin Mountains.

Finally, you might enjoy Chris McCully's 'Dictionary of Fly Fishing' which gives historical origins to many fly fishing terms as well as simply defining them. I really enjoyed reading it 'as a book' as opposed to a reference.

Happy hols!
 
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diawl bach

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For a good read, holiday or not, I recommend the Mortdecai Trilogy by
Kyril Bonfiglioli -

The Mortdecai Trilogy: Amazon.co.uk: Kyril Bonfiglioli: 9780141003771: Books

Cracking review here - a momentous book on many levels for the true bibliophile. the descriptions of various people, places and events within the book are one of a kind compared to most authors. the overall feeling I got during and after having finished it was ' here was a writer truly free in his art.' a zen classic disguised as a fictional comedic tale. warmly recommended.
 

corto maltese

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Speaking as an anglo-saxon also married to a French woman you should read, « 1000 years of annoying the French », by Stephen Clarke. Make sure that SWMBO sees the title several times!

Take care

Terry

Thanks for that, reading this as I finish a huge arguement with my french wife about the complete impossibility of any influence on the French peasants of the English revolution !.
Apparently it was all about blind faith in intellectuals from Paris, no travelling fairs in the countryside, no rumours, no information or influence at all. Don't even mention any influence on the Russian Revolution by the French one. Apparently all peasents are completely isolated, deaf and dumb but have massive faith in intellectual aliens from the capital !
Huge fight, I'm a peasent and she is an intellectual, how the hell did we ever get together ?Could be sleeping in the spare room tonight :eek:mg
I wish I had a warm pig to cuddle up to !
All this cos I'm reading an intellectual book about the history of the English nation
, Only cos I don't feel typically English with my roots, more an accident of geography so I wanted to be better informed so be able to better to understand and explain to others here in France.
That'll flipping teach me to get above me station !
Now, where's me warm pig, I wanna go to bed :(
 
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Lewis Chessman

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Just a thought, CM, but I researched my ancestry recently and found it fascinating - minor aristocracy on my dad's side circa 1200, ag. labs and mariners for ever on my mum's. It explains my pompous arrogance and love of peasant food! :D
One ancestor recce'd N. America for Raliegh in the 1580s, another was 'Captain Moonlite', a gay bushwhacker in C.19th Australia (if that's not a contradiction in terms!) and a great, great grandfather was sued by Dickens for plagiarising 'A Christmas Carol' in 1843.

Many companies have a free trial period that would cover your holiday and if you focused on your direct line you would make good progress in two weeks. You could be discovering your own story rather than reading someone else's.
 

bonefishblues

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Adults in the Room by Yanis Varoufakis. An insider's account of the Greek debt crisis of 3 years ago, and in particular the treatment of Greece by the international institutions. Highly partial, of course, but utterly fascinating, and revealing. Filled me full of foreboding for the Brexit negotiations.
 

morayfisher

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The History of Fly Fishing in 50 flies is excellent ( I thought so anyway).
Unfortunately I don't think it's in Kindle format.
 

diawl bach

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'A River Runs Through It' is available on Kindle?

Only if you drop your tablet in the bath.

Actually it is.

Thanks for the Altered Carbon tip MFF, I'll check those out as I enjoy SF - I was gutted when Ian Banks died, my favourite author.

Discovered Peter F Hamilton recently and have been totally absorbed by first The Commonwealth Saga and currently the Void Trilogy. Definitely not for the faint hearted these are loooong books with several eventually intertwined plots on the go but they do reward the effort.

They're over 1000 pages long, I bought all 5 through abe books and was a bit shocked when they turned up, in hardback they weigh over a kilo each so kindle versions would save the arms somewhat.
 

morayfisher

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Only if you drop your tablet in the bath.

Actually it is.

Thanks for the Altered Carbon tip MFF, I'll check those out as I enjoy SF - I was gutted when Ian Banks died, my favourite author.

Discovered Peter F Hamilton recently and have been totally absorbed by first The Commonwealth Saga and currently the Void Trilogy. Definitely not for the faint hearted these are loooong books with several eventually intertwined plots on the go but they do reward the effort.

They're over 1000 pages long, I bought all 5 through abe books and was a bit shocked when they turned up, in hardback they weigh over a kilo each so kindle versions would save the arms somewhat.

High jacking this thread a bit but yes, the early death of Iain Banks was a tragic loss to SF literature.
I've read everything of his, some twice. Not so keen on his none SF except the Wasp Factory though.

If you haven't read the Rama trilogy (Arthur C Clarke) then that's well worth it.
 

corto maltese

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Hey guys, I've not decided yet which of your suggestions to try, thanks for all the recommendations, I've got reading material to last me five holiday now !
I just wanted to say thanks for all your help, it's very kind of you all.
Tomorrow I'm going to see what I can get that you've suggested, as frankly most of it tickled my fancy, on the kindle.
Cheers boys, you did me proud :thumbs:
 

corto maltese

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Really enjoying the Mordecai trilogy, thank Daiwl Bach :thumbs:
Off to the Haute Alps tomorrow for my last three days of the season, hopefully I won't get much time to finish the book !
Thanks for the tip mate and thanks to all for all the suggestions, intend to work my way through them all !
 

heathenwoods

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If you wanted to really annoy your wife with a very different kind of history (or English and Italian 'peasants') then Christopher Hill's English Revolution studies are a good read and informative (especially The World Turned Upside Down) whilst Carlo Ginzburg's The Cheese and the Worms about the surprisingly well-informed Italian rural population of the 16th Century is far more entertaining than you'd expect it to be whilst providing detail that would support the argument you're making. Not sure how well-regarded they are now as they depend on evidence and not, um, 'interpretative' approaches to history.
 
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