Improving my casting distance.

fingask

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Sep 4, 2012
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I might regret asking this question.

Would a different type of floating line enable me to cast further? If so what type/make. It is on a 20 acre still water lake.
I use a Hardy jet 9'6" #6 rod and a Mike Evans arrowhead trout twin line. I am not sure they are still being made; so I would be looking at future replacements. I can get a reasonable distance but just wondering if that could be improved.

I know someone will say get get a casting lesson or it will have something to do with the rod - change the rod. I don't want to do either; so am just wondering would a different type of line help. Please keep answers simple and not to full of tech speak.

I am probably being silly but it worth asking.
Try asking a few mates if you can cast some of their set ups down the local park when you can get out cheaper than playing flyline lotto accuracy and presentation before distance every time tight lines
 

andygrey

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I think you're right about Micheal Evans lines being no longer available. I'm pretty familiar with them and like them a lot. The Barrio GT90 is very similar but I think a tad heavier. Both lines have a very long rear taper and favour a 'carrying' casting style rather than a 'shooting' one. The GT90 and the longer GT125 are firm favourites of distance casters.
 

sailingval

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Dec 19, 2010
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I use 5WT with a wf6 inter, I tried a Wulff triangle taper it was terrible (for Me)My advice would be go back to where you thought you were making a nice cast, forget about distance just now, start from there , and as you go analyse your actions, slowly build up from there, don't try to power the rod too much just ease into it, distance isn't always every thing , presentation is just as important, some times you find yourself doing too many false casts, try and cut it to no more than 2 , hope that is of help to you, easker1


Yes, helpful thanks.
 

Hardrar

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Changing your rod would be a start, as someone who used to compete in casting competitions, Hardys tend to “fold” and suffer line drop, as they are not progressive enough. No low down power. You need probably one of the fast US rods. A Loomis GLX or Streamdance, Sage X, XP, or Orvis Helios.
Nine foot six is also a bit long - leverage reduces tip speed. 8 foot 9” to 9’ is better, I’ve been lucky enough to fish the Caribbean flats several times and 8 foot to 8 foot six rods are the length for those 40 yard plus casts, anything longer is too tiring and sluggish, I only used a #6 mainly too, sometimes a #7 if the breeze picked up.
One of the big issues with a fast and long casting rod however, is it will be a poor fishing rod- you’ll bump or break off loads and need a stronger leader, I’ve won comps with short casts and a light set up, long casts can “line” more fish than you catch at distance.
I now use virtually exclusively, fast glass now and this enables me to fish much lighter tippets, with the forgiving tips reducing bump offs and breakage to next to nothing.
 

JayP

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Changing your rod would be a start, as someone who used to compete in casting competitions, Hardys tend to “fold” and suffer line drop, as they are not progressive enough. No low down power. You need probably one of the fast US rods. A Loomis GLX or Streamdance, Sage X, XP, or Orvis Helios.
Nine foot six is also a bit long - leverage reduces tip speed. 8 foot 9” to 9’ is better, I’ve been lucky enough to fish the Caribbean flats several times and 8 foot to 8 foot six rods are the length for those 40 yard plus casts, anything longer is too tiring and sluggish, I only used a #6 mainly too, sometimes a #7 if the breeze picked up.
One of the big issues with a fast and long casting rod however, is it will be a poor fishing rod- you’ll bump or break off loads and need a stronger leader, I’ve won comps with short casts and a light set up, long casts can “line” more fish than you catch at distance.
I now use virtually exclusively, fast glass now and this enables me to fish much lighter tippets, with the forgiving tips reducing bump offs and breakage to next to nothing.
Do you drive a Mercedes and fly toy aircraft too? :unsure:
 

Jem68

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Sep 24, 2019
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Sanday, Orkney
I started fly fishing two and a half years ago and have reached a certain level of proficiency, but my casting remains flawed and inconsistent, as I can easily tell from observing other anglers and indeed what my own rod can do when I come close to "getting it right."

I will be seeking tuition next year as having an expert observe and correct my style would clearly be a vast improvement on slow progress via youtube and self observation.

However, to answer the original post, over the past year I have considerably improved my distance, from an average of 60 to 80 plus feet (hand to fly), and here's how -
- ten foot, six weight rod with a seven weight line and 15 foot leader with a heavy point fly; if you can get a line out straight, the combination alone buys distance
- a great deal of practice on land and water
- attention to acceleration and added force at the end of both back and fore cast
- working in a haul on the final back cast; my hauling is crude and often not proportional to the amount of line outside the rod tip, but it still adds to the yards

On my local loch, wading deep and casting lures on long lines to the sides of weed beds brought me a trickle of fish during the past season. I did not make the best use of those June and July evenings when the fish were highly active in the margins, rising for caenis and sedge, thanks no doubt to rough presentation and making no serious use of dries. This is why I love the sport - there's so much to learn and the learning is pure pleasure !
 
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sailingval

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With poor watercraft and water smacking with poor presentation they could be a long way out, however we don't know sailingvals circumstances so I was making a suggestion, he my well present the fly perfectly :)

I don't always present my flies perfectly but folk have been kind enough to say that my casting is quite good. By the way I am she not he, so I might not have the same strength as some of the gentlemen to get the line out but I seem to equal others. Trying to avoid the gender debate going on elsewhere on the forum!
 

Jem68

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Very much depends upon where the fish are!

Yes, sorry, feet not yards ! I have certainly pushed fish away by heavy casting and wading. My 15yr old, a better caster than me in everything except distance, has caught fish at close range on days when I struggled.
 

easker1

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Highlands
Val, Casting has more to do with Finesse than strength,when I used to teach I preferred teaching women, it is much easier to get them to use the rod and not get into surf casting which I found a lot of men think is the way forward, it is a skill thing , esker1
 

Steven kermode

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May 28, 2014
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104
in my opinion, a clean and well treated line should give a little more distance!
When I started in the 70s, there were far fewer options!
weight forward & perhaps long belly & double taper & off course homemade shooting heads,
matching the weight of line to the rod is the most important thing!
A worn-out or dirty line won't cast as good!
Fly anglers put too much emphasis on their tackle!
It's the caster who makes a good cast! not the rod & line, of course, good tools do help,
The manufacturers are giving us too much choice and diversity in order to make us buy and try
things we don't need!
Not content with confusing us with all those complicated variations on simple tapers!
they're messing about with the standard weighting system most of us understand!
Is a line a 6# or a 7#? A 6# that's heavier than a 6#! isn't that a 6.5 or a 7#??
I'm no genius but even I could understand that the optimal load for a given rod was based
on the weight of the first 30 feet of line! if you cast less than, go up a size!
With a double taper, and wanted to cast with more line in the air for distance you would
go down a wieght! Double tapers get heavier the more line extended!
There are three basic tapers! match line weight to the rod! & keep lines in good condition!
And most of all study the basics, look for faults in your casting stroke, & practice fixing them!
And save some money
 

sailingval

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Dec 19, 2010
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293
Thanks for everyone's replies. Some were really helpful. I will keep trying to improve my presentation and maybe when life gets back to normal I will think about another lesson.
 

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