Improving my casting distance.

Paul_B

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
5,971
Location
West Riding of Yorkshire
Sorry Val,
I know a few ladies who teach fly fishing (or they did when I fished Thrybergh), two fish or did fish back then for Englands ladies team :)

However heres one Lady who I''d recommend to anyone who's interested in fly fishing, the legendary Joan Wulff

 

Paul_B

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
5,971
Location
West Riding of Yorkshire
Theres more in her series of tuition films
I'll add the one about her history, and while lockdown is on have a read about Georgina Ballantyna, we men have a lot of catching up to do :) 🎣

 

Hardrar

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
1,291
Location
North Yorkshire
Timing can be an issue that needs setting right. I’m not particularly tall or have thick wrists, but have a pretty honed action and can cast a fair distance with little effort after many many years, good kit helps a lot, but it’s more about timing and finding what technique suits your own biomechanics- we’re all different and what works for one, won’t work for others, adapting a good “ stop” “drift”then “power snap”as Joan Wulff tutors, is a good base to progress from.
Dry casting over grass hones your action, but you don’t have the water to anchor your roll off from.
As previously said, presentation is more critical than great distance, to netting more fish, as is the correct patterns!
 

sailingval

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 19, 2010
Messages
293
Theres more in her series of tuition films
I'll add the one about her history, and while lockdown is on have a read about Georgina Ballantyna, we men have a lot of catching up to do :) 🎣


Thanks for those - I shall enjoy watching them.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
2,731
Location
South Northants
. . . I prefer Joans videos, however they'll all add to the mix.

I would certainly concur with that.

This YouTube video is an excellent guide to developing the ability to double haul . . .


. . . if you can do this it's far more beneficial than buying a new line, rod, shirt or waders, or anything else with a label on it.
 

Paul_B

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
5,971
Location
West Riding of Yorkshire
Or a least try a few,
I like to try before I buy and would have gone to Pure Fishing at Alnwick this year to try a few if it hadn't been for Corvid :cry:
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
48,850
I don't like video's for learning, you can get things to try out and the odd gem but the practice to then learn it can be tedious and full of blind alleys.
One to one instruction is not my ideal either, it is the best option available for most but it is hard work and I personally get 10% out of the whole thing.
The most natural learning for me is/was hanging out with a couple of very good casters, just messing about and having a laugh, trying this and that.
And possibly the fastest learning curve is video footage uploaded and analysed, especially a few times over time.
For a beginner or someone that doesn't cast with others much a very rapid learning curve is handing your rod to an instructor, and just seeing what the same rod and line can do in their hands.
 

tynelobster

Active member
Joined
Jan 17, 2013
Messages
39
A coupe of hours with a decent instructor will do far more for most people's casting than any new line or rod. As part of the lesson you should get some proper assessment/advice re your kit and wether it suits you and your style. You should also be able to try some different stuff out once your technique has been polished. Only place to start IMHO
 

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
2,078
Location
Scotland
I don't like video's for learning, you can get things to try out and the odd gem but the practice to then learn it can be tedious and full of blind alleys.
One to one instruction is not my ideal either, it is the best option available for most but it is hard work and I personally get 10% out of the whole thing.
The most natural learning for me is/was hanging out with a couple of very good casters, just messing about and having a laugh, trying this and that.
And possibly the fastest learning curve is video footage uploaded and analysed, especially a few times over time.
For a beginner or someone that doesn't cast with others much a very rapid learning curve is handing your rod to an instructor, and just seeing what the same rod and line can do in their hands.
Problem with your comment regarding good casters, they most often are instructors like the ones I know so you are still getting instructions. I do like one to one tuition, much more focus than group lessons/messing about.
 

speytime

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,568
Location
West Lothian Scotland
I think videos are good to learn from you can take it in at your own pace, I've got a rio spey casting dvd with Simon Gawsworth every time I watch it I take something away I didn't notice or wasn't good enough to do previously.

I've also the Joan Wulf Dvd which I learned a awful lot from over a period of time.

Al
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
48,850
Problem with your comment regarding good casters, they most often are instructors like the ones I know so you are still getting instructions. I do like one to one tuition, much more focus than group lessons/messing about.

We all learn differently and knowing what works for us speeds up the process, the single most effective learning I have ever seen was the casting club, a mixture of focused tuition and seeing how far you can cast someone's sock.
 

speytime

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,568
Location
West Lothian Scotland
I read a post a couple of days ago and had a sudden realisation that I've never counted/added the rod length and taper?
I managed to cast an extra 22/23 feet without lifting a rod 🤣
During the lock down I managed to get 100ft of line outside the top guide, I also picked up shooting line into the back cast thanks to PaulD 👍

Al
 

Hardrar

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
1,291
Location
North Yorkshire
I think videos are good to learn from you can take it in at your own pace, I've got a rio spey casting dvd with Simon Gawsworth every time I watch it I take something away I didn't notice or wasn't good enough to do previously.

I've also the Joan Wulf Dvd which I learned a awful lot from over a period of time.

Al

I taught myself 50 years or so back, by watching videos (no internet back then) reading multiple books Lee Wulff and Joan Wulff and many others etc also watching Michael Evans at shows and of coursemany hours and hours of practice and asking old hands for tips.
I used to compete in beach casting distance competitions too, which is purely about timing( lethal if you get it wrong with a six ounce lead!)
You have to adapt your style to your body morphology and no amount of lessons will harden your joints and sinews or improve your timing like long hours of practice will.
I think when I started double handed fly casting and learned to Spey Skagit and jump roll, that improved my single handed casting dramatically.
I’ve had quite a few lesson over the years and undertaken courses and not learned that much.
The last course I enrolled on, about 20 years ago, the instructor told me I was wasting my time and money being there, with a wry smile, I was a bit upset and asked why? He simply handed me his rod and said “show me how to cast like you can” which was a shock to me. After the course, I did actually end up coaching him.
A good rod, balanced correctly (far too many modern reels are way too light) and a good line will make a big difference to not only distance and presentation but much more importantly the amount of effort required. There are not that many bad rods now, but some are just a lot better and what suits one will not suit another.
I would always say “try before you buy.”I am lucky as have a dealer I’ve dealt with for decades who now lets me take rods on “appro” as he knows I’ll buy at least one rod.
I still give tutoring now foc, people gave me their time to help me foc bitd so I do the same now, pity the Covid is restricting being able to do this!
Just keep practicing!
 
Last edited:

andygrey

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
3,479
Location
West Oxfordshire
I have a bit of a problem with a lot of many (American) instructional casting videos advocating the wrist-snap for beginners/improvers. Yes it's a very good technique for adding line speed BUT is difficult to master. The wrist-snap relies on a controlled action to the stop, and the only way of learning to control your wrist is but first NOT using it. I see quite a few people trying to use a wrist-snap after the stop which is counterproductive... soggy stop, big open loop etc. etc. I'd only really advocate learning to incorporate a wrist-snap once you have mastered casting with a well controlled wrist. Drift however is not only relatively easy to learn but also can eliminate creep.
 

JayP

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
3,806
Location
St Neots, Cambs
I don't like video's for learning, you can get things to try out and the odd gem but the practice to then learn it can be tedious and full of blind alleys.
One to one instruction is not my ideal either, it is the best option available for most but it is hard work and I personally get 10% out of the whole thing.
The most natural learning for me is/was hanging out with a couple of very good casters, just messing about and having a laugh, trying this and that.
And possibly the fastest learning curve is video footage uploaded and analysed, especially a few times over time.
For a beginner or someone that doesn't cast with others much a very rapid learning curve is handing your rod to an instructor, and just seeing what the same rod and line can do in their hands.

Video analysis is one of the best teaching tools out there for sports performance and biomechanics yet almost completely overlooked by the FF instructing world. Think they're missing a trick especially during times of covid restrictions!
 
Top