Investments in fly fishing gear

GerryMc

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I am seriously tempted to invest in the Hardy Trout Smuggler Set – Hardy have collaborated with the Salmon and Trout Conservation trust
This collaboration marks Hardy’s support for their conservation efforts and a revenue contribution from each sale will go to the Salmon and Trout Conservation Trust (their vision, which is for healthier wild fish stocks, improved biodiversity and less pollution in our rivers)
Now the question is. Is this a good investment. I have never invested in fishing gear.
its a lot of money. However in a few years down the line its should gain not loss.
Or should i not?
 

Jason 70

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I had a rod made by Barder in 2008 and that cost a grand. I think the same rod now costs £2,200. Mine is still in superb condition and it was fished with landing Barbel well into double figures and river carp to 18lb. But if I sold it now, I doubt it would be worth much more than I paid for it. So I would say no as an investment. Why not buy it and use it, if you have the bunce.
 

Mr Notherone

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My wife 'invests' in stuff all the time - she's never sold anything. She also buy 'bargains' all the time. After the latest 'bargain' I try and explain that we now have something we don't need and less money in the bank!

There are relatively few things in life that go up in value and they are well known. I would say, buy the rod if you want it but don't expect to make any money...:)
 

bobmiddlepoint

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She also buy 'bargains' all the time. After the latest 'bargain' I try and explain that we now have something we don't need and less money in the bank!

Let me help you with female bargain mathematics. Basically all money is considered spent so if an item usually costs £200 but is on sale for £100 when a female buys it they actually gain £100.

It noticeable how more males are being affected by this, probably as a result of residue from the contraceptive pill getting into our drinking water. You can also see how this has affected telephone useage. When I was a lad only women spent hours on the dog and bone whereas men only ever had two sentence thirty second calls. Nowadays many “men” are rabbiting on half the day.


Andy
 

pati

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Nov 20, 2012
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I am seriously tempted to invest in the Hardy Trout Smuggler Set – Hardy have collaborated with the Salmon and Trout Conservation trust
This collaboration marks Hardy’s support for their conservation efforts and a revenue contribution from each sale will go to the Salmon and Trout Conservation Trust (their vision, which is for healthier wild fish stocks, improved biodiversity and less pollution in our rivers)
Now the question is. Is this a good investment. I have never invested in fishing gear.
its a lot of money. However in a few years down the line its should gain not loss.
Or should i not?
Sorry to crash the party but the answer is no!

I don’t know of ANY carbon fly rod’s value having increased over time (happy to stand corrected with examples though?). Only some rare bamboo rods from a limited number of makers have (and the list is fairly narrow when you correct for inflation, Pinkie Gillum, some E Garrison etc. ).

It is the same with reels, only a very very few reels do appreciate in value and they are typically bench made by a very few people (eg some Dingley made), but most of them actually lose value when correcting for inflation.

So all in all it is a terrible financial investment, and that’s even before looking at things like liquidity (ie. To sell one of these items you will probably need involvement of a specialist dealer, and it may take time to find the right buyer).

Then from a fishing perspective I am fairly convinced you can get much better than what is in that kit at a fraction of the cost…

As to the donation to the Conservation trust, you don’t need private equity owned Hardy in the middle - they just take a cut- you can make a direct donation to the trust.
 

Vintage Badger

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Traditionally, vintage and classic fishing reels and antique lures have been the thing to collect and appear to have risen in value over the years. I believe this is because it's a lot easier to display a collection of reels or lures than it is to display a collection of fishing rods.

I bought several split cane fly rods in the early 90's as I liked them and nobody else seemed to want them, so most were bought for around the £20 mark, which equates to around £45 today. So yes, they've probably gone up a bit more than that, with perhaps some of them doubling or tripling in value over the years, the rest showing a more modest increase. This is probably due to cane rods gaining something of a following in more recent years, rather than just purely their desirability as a collector's item. Either way, I've not lost money on them (which wasn't really the reason I bought them - I just liked them!), but put it this way, I won't be selling them and retiring on the proceeds!

Whether or not a modern 'limited edition' rod will lose or gain money over the next 10 or 20 years is anyone's guess really. It might be seen as a desirable thing of beauty, it might be seen as a somewhat cliched gimmick. That's the thing with investments, if they were a sure-fire winner then everyone would be buying them.

The essential thing to remember is that collectables can go down as well as up in value over the years - just look what's happened to the price of some once desirable and expensive antiques, these days you can hardly give the stuff away!
 
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Waltyluft

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I'm not sure I'd agree with most. I think there's a good chance that will appreciate a fair bit, particularly if you are prepared to sell to the US.
Only 115 sets of made in England kit!!. Will sell well over there I expect.
Could be wrong but who knows for sure. I will say you would be extremely unlikely to lose money on it imho.
 

Overmiwadrers

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if you are looking to make money invest in a stocks and shares ISA and get some fund investment or Buy your self a used Rolex with box and papers , there are a few models that are excellent investments and prices are going up all the time. Do not buy one without all the paperwork. They are almost impossible to insure and poor investments ,
I second about fly fishing stuff being generally a poor investment . I have lots and lots of fly fishing tackle and interestingly the only stuff that I could make a profit on is the things I wouldnt sell.

O M W
 

Vintage Badger

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I don’t know of ANY carbon fly rod’s value having increased over time (happy to stand corrected with examples though?).
The only carbon fly rod I know of that seems to have increased in value is the Sage FLi - I paid £225 for mine in 2008 and you should see what's being asked for them in VG used condition on eBay these days, if you can find one for sale!

However, as we've both said, once you've corrected for inflation there's no real profit there, and have you seen the price of equivalent 'branded name' fly rods these days, which you'd need to pay if you wanted to replace it with a similar rod. Sorry to take the subject off the collector's theme for a moment with this post, but you did ask the question.
 

Sash

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Aug 30, 2006
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London & SW Wales
I am seriously tempted to invest in the Hardy Trout Smuggler Set – Hardy have collaborated with the Salmon and Trout Conservation trust
This collaboration marks Hardy’s support for their conservation efforts and a revenue contribution from each sale will go to the Salmon and Trout Conservation Trust (their vision, which is for healthier wild fish stocks, improved biodiversity and less pollution in our rivers)
Now the question is. Is this a good investment. I have never invested in fishing gear.
its a lot of money. However in a few years down the line its should gain not loss.
Or should i not?
Key questions to ask yourself include:

1) are you ever intending to use this kit, or just put it in the cupboard, and hope it goes up in price at some stage? Because the first time to use the kit, soil the handle and put rash on the reel rim, you will have lost about half your money in terms of resale value to a collector.

2) is this tackle which you would buy separately, for regular use? Most normal fishermen do not use Hardy Smugglers very often, and the second hand market is awash with them, many given as retirement presents. (full disclosure: I have three Smugglers, so I am not baised against them, just very open-eyed).

3) do you actually want to make a charitable donation, or just spend a lot of money on something you hope might appreciate in value? If the former, then donate the money (say, the difference between the price of this kit and the normal rod and reel) straight to S&TCT, do the Gift Aid bit, and you have done the right thing.

I have seen very little modern fly tackle that genuinely appreciates in value, and that which does tends to be hand-built one-offs: Ari t'Hart reels, the very best cane rods, almost nothing plastic. Everything else turns up on Ebay eventually.

115 kits (if that is the number) is a lot: any print run that long the prints would be worth (probably much) less than one tenth of the original picture.

And, if Hardys gives, say, £100 per kit to S&TCT, that's £11,500. That is not a terribly generous donation for a conservation charity, especially since Hardys will still be making some money on the deal, if only from the volume.

However, it's your money......
 

GerryMc

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Jul 24, 2021
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49
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Fife
Sorry to crash the party but the answer is no!

I don’t know of ANY carbon fly rod’s value having increased over time (happy to stand corrected with examples though?). Only some rare bamboo rods from a limited number of makers have (and the list is fairly narrow when you correct for inflation, Pinkie Gillum, some E Garrison etc. ).

It is the same with reels, only a very very few reels do appreciate in value and they are typically bench made by a very few people (eg some Dingley made), but most of them actually lose value when correcting for inflation.

So all in all it is a terrible financial investment, and that’s even before looking at things like liquidity (ie. To sell one of these items you will probably need involvement of a specialist dealer, and it may take time to find the right buyer).

Then from a fishing perspective I am fairly convinced you can get much better than what is in that kit at a fraction of the cost…

As to the donation to the Conservation trust, you don’t need private equity owned Hardy in the middle - they just take a cut- you can make a direct donation to the trust.
I see that out of the collection of only 120 produced. No 1 bought retail £1500 sold at auction £10000 !!!
 

sean freeman

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Dec 4, 2010
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Manchester
I’ve started venturing into cryptocurrency, money to be made and far better returns, although nowhere near as fun as collecting tackle.

I’ve never bought something expensive expecting it to be a decent investment though and I only ever got lucky with one item tbh, a Rolex I bought and sold five years later when the Rolex sports model supply and demand 'issues' started.

I’d buy it and enjoy it if you have the cash.
 
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