Is a 9' 5# too light a rod for small stilwaters?

fatfifer

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Glenrothes, Fife
I am fairly new to fly fishing and have been using a 10' 7/8# rod with 8# lines floating and sinktip on small stillwaters. Recently I bought a 9'5# agility 2 and a 5# floating line for using on trips up to Caithness. However I'm not likely to be going to Caithness for a while and am dying to try out the new rod. The place I usually go to has some big rainbows(a 13lb fish was taken a couple of weeks ago - not by me sadly!). So my question is if I try out my new rod at my usual place and happen to be fortunate enough to hook a monster what is the worst that can happen? ie could I break the rod ?I generally use 8lb fluoro.
Sorry if this is a stupid question.
Thanks in advance,
Ewan
 

bonefishblues

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You're mistaking the fish weight rating for the AFTM rating I think - your rod will only handle up to 5lb, so absolutely no, don't fish for bigger fish as it will void the warranty.
 

Harvey

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Hi Ewan.
Your 5# will be fine in fact it is my chosen weight for small stillwaters. My club waters also have some big fish and I have landed plenty with my 5#s. The worst that could happen is your tippet will snap but this is more unlikely with the 5# than the 8# as the 5# will bend and absorb the shock better. It is the wind strength that determines which rod I use; no wind up to light wind I will use a 5# with 5# line, as the wind picks up I'll put a 6# line on the 5# rod. Windy and I'll use a 7# rod and line, again putting a 8# line on it as the wind picks up, finally moving up to a 8# rod with 8# line in very windy conditions. Hope this helps.
 

noel

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If I understand bonefishblues correctly then for say a 15lb fish we need a 15wt rod.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
 
D

Deleted member 8214

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I've used #5wt rods on our local reservoirs for several years now and find them perfectly adequate and they are a lot more pleasure to use than a #7wt. I've also landed fish up to 12lb.
 

linkledger

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I always use a 5# rod and a 6# line and never have any problems. Your Shakespeare rod is only about 3 1/2 ounces you won't even notice you using it.

Go back to a 7# rod and you will think you have a telegraph pole in you hand.

Lighter rod will cast plenty far enough to catch fish and a pleasure to use. Enjoy:cheer2:
 
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speytime

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I'd wouldn't hesitate to use 5wt on still water, imo you,ll land anything you hook with it considering you have a huge expanse of water in front of you, it,ll take a bit longer to land a larger fish but that's all part of the fun.
Al
 

Beacon Beige

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#5 is perfect for stillwater , I use 8ft and 8.5ft #5 on all my stillwater
and Reservoir fishing!

More fun playing a 3lb trout on a #5 than playing it on an 8 weight!
#5 and #4 adds greatly to fishing enjoyment!

Col
 

ohanzee

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The 5 is the right tool but the 13b fish makes it all a bit weird, it strikes me like getting a bigger stomach for an eat all you can buffet?
 

banjo298

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I have a 9ft 5# Shakespeare Agility which has rapidly become my go to rod, for nymph and buzzers fishing. (If windy or pulling lures I stick to the 7#). It’s so light and easy to handle compared to the 7#s I used to use. I’ve had rainbows to 16lbs on it and it handles them well, giving a far more interesting fight than the heavier rods.
 

bonefishblues

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You're mistaking the fish weight rating for the AFTM rating I think - your rod will only handle up to 5lb, so absolutely no, don't fish for bigger fish as it will void the warranty.

Since it's now after noon, I thought I'd better say that this is errant nonsense, but it still had one on the bob, one on the middle dropper, and one on point :whistle:
 

roger h 10

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Another vote for the #5. Just make sure that you've got plenty of backing on your reel in case you hook one that heads for the horizon, obviously the #5 won't have the stopping power of the #8 weight but will be far more enjoyable to use.
 

ohanzee

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In the 50's Lee Wulff caused a fuss by landing a salmon on a 9' single handed cane rod, blowing the British myth of needing an 18' double hander and a back operation, the trend from the US was what the UK called 'the short rod', and we been importing and using the US standard in fly fishing ever since.
That would have been that for trout fishing had it not been for the importation of their trout too, bred to catch and bigger than the standard range of wild trout in the UK, this jumbles it up a bit, what is an appropriate weight outfit for extra large trout? if we went with traditional British logic an 18' double hander would be just the job.

For me the weight of outfit is determined by what I can make the best presentation with, all day without breaking my arm, I cast way more than I land fish so the lightest rod I can get away with makes sense, and up the tippet to suit.
 
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D

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My favourite rod for fishing dries on the reservoir is an 8'6" #4-5wt Sonik sk3 - the first trout I ever caught on it was a 6lb rainbow which was landed without much ado.
 
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