Is it all about the numbers???

Craig808

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The places I fly fish are pleasant places to be, regardless of whether I fish or not. I'd still visit them if I could, even if I'd given up fishing them. I don't have an arbitrary number I have to reach to make a day good, it's all relative to the venue and conditions, method and challenge, and the odd surprise.

Sometimes just being there in my own company, casting a fly with gear that's a pleasure to use, is enough, (it certainly would be just now!).

However some other forms of fishing perhaps need a numerical/competitive/social element to be worthwhile. I believe that's why match fishing was so popular on the hard river and industrial canal venues of my youth. Fishing for a 1lb 6oz net of twenty odd roach was so much more satisfying if it was a good result on the day. Without the competition, I think repeatedly catching tiny roach from a grim grey semi polluted canal, weekend after weekend, would've soon palled for most.
Many years ago I used to do a lot of coarse fishing on canals.

Exactly as you described happened to me. I got bored and packed it in.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Another thing I would add is that I have not fished any kind of competition for over 20 years now, and I have not killed a fish for several years. So, when I go fishing there is no concept of 'numbers'. I struggle to keep a score in my head when it is required for fishery records. I get to about 3 and then I'm never sure what the number is. 🤪 The objective is always to enjoy the day and for that I am looking for 'sport'. My mates and I tend to come off the water and the question is, did we have a good day's sport? The answer will be measured by lots of factors, including the particular water fished, the sort of fish it is known for, both in size and numbers, the weather, the fly hatch, and lots of others. The number of chances we had counts for a lot. You can have a good day's sport simply by getting lots of chances, half chances, fish birled, fish moved, fish seen, rises seen, independently of whether you landed fish.

There might have been a group of 10 of us out in 5 boats, and at the end of the day, the talk will be about how good a day we all had. And after we have finished discussing it, no one will even have mentioned a number for fish caught - as it really doesn't matter in the slightest to anyone. In fact, it ends up being a bit vulgar to mention a number and thereby admit that you were keeping score! 😜

Col
 

Scotty Mitchell

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Likewise Col, the people I fish with and I can have good sport without releasing a fish, offers etc.
I usually say to that “if I were a good angler I’d have released a good few fish today”
😀
 

Tangled

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I'm not really interested in catching lots of fish but I'm very interested in catching something. In between those two extremes is a broad expanse of fogginess.

I can have a good day without catching very much or even nothing at all so long as I think I have a chance and chances happen.

The poor days for me - and I do have a few days were I come away thinking that I didn't really enjoy a lot of that, rare though they are - are when I'm flogging dead water; where if you do catch something you know it was just a fluke.

I can have good days salmon fishing when I know that there's no fish in the river just by getting into a good casting rhythm, but I don't get that flogging a small lake in August when you know that the fish are comatose. Better off on the golf course.
 
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Craig808

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In fact, it ends up being a bit vulgar to mention a number

And that's basically what I was getting at.
When I chat to people or hear their conversations it's always "how many ". It's the first question that's asked and pretty much the only one.

I sometimes feel like I'm being measured by my catch rate. Infact on occasions I have been...publicly.
 
D

Deleted member 90002

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And that's basically what I was getting at.
When I chat to people or hear their conversations it's always "how many ". It's the first question that's asked and pretty much the only one.

I sometimes feel like I'm being measured by my catch rate. Infact on occasions I have been...publicly.
Sad to here of such things lad. Enjoy the sport ignore to55er5..
 

Gdog

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And that's basically what I was getting at.
When I chat to people or hear their conversations it's always "how many ". It's the first question that's asked and pretty much the only one.

I sometimes feel like I'm being measured by my catch rate. Infact on occasions I have been...publicly.
Exactly, when I'm packing up after fishing a particular stocked stillwater, if I bump in to the owner he always how I got on. I'll usually say, I had an enjoyable day, if there were fish rising, I caught a few on dry fly, it's fishing well etc. He listens to all this, he always asks how many did you catch, then will I tell him how many.

On a certain wild fishery where I'm a club member, we all ask how did you get on, more often than not, yeah blanked again. Oh well
 

dcb

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It could be worse, we could be sea anglers ........ "how many ?" is an important question for the mackie bashers 😁😉
 

green man

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I'm one of those for whom the act of standing in the middle of a river and casting a line is as pleasurable as the actual catching of fish. I don't care if I blank - the fish have every right to ignore my advances.

The only places I've encountered anyone talking numbers or weights, or how far you can cast, were on artificially-stocked lakes (when I was learning to cast, play and land a fish) and when I had a rod on a salmon river. With all due respect to the salmon fishermen and stockie bashers on the Forum, these activities seem to attract a disproportionate number of macho men.
.
 

Lewis Chessman

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I remember fishing the Annan one June many years ago. In the party was a lovely Irish lady in her late 70s, I'd say, charming and 'old school'.
The runs were poor at the time and we were all struggling to catch anything, but a little overnight rain brought the river up a couple of inches and the fly came around beautifully.

At lunch I asked her whether, if she knew for certain that there wasn't one fish in the river, she would still go for a cast when conditions were so perfect for fishing a fly.
"Yes," she said, "Yes, I would!"

I tip my hat to her memory, and agree completely. Often just the being there is enough.
 

smallmouth

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Many years ago I used to do a lot of coarse fishing on canals.

Exactly as you described happened to me. I got bored and packed it in.
It wasn’t boredom that got to me. I was still enjoying matches on the rivers, canals and “natural” stillwaters. But I was starting to really dread humping all the gear before and after.

It came to head after a summer match on the river a couple of years ago, which involved a lengthy walk. After the match a friend and I were comparing notes and I remarked that I was truly knackered. He told me that he’d actually weighed the tackle and bait he carried to a typical match and multiplied it by the loading into the car, out of the car, on to the trolley, off the trolley and so on, to get the total weight lifted......remarking “it’s like doing a shift on a coal wagon”. Within months I’d sold all mine.

Now the weight/numbers of fish caught doesn’t matter, the waters are scenic and peaceful, the actual fishing is just as absorbing. l can take my time and just “stand and stare” if I feel like it. Plus after each session I get back in the car feeling refreshed and thinking about things I might try, or flies I might tie, for next time, rather than just being exhausted and dreading having to unload all that gear out of the car when I get home.
 
D

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It wasn’t boredom that got to me. I was still enjoying matches on the rivers, canals and “natural” stillwaters. But I was starting to really dread humping all the gear before and after.

It came to head after a summer match on the river a couple of years ago, which involved a lengthy walk. After the match a friend and I were comparing notes and I remarked that I was truly knackered. He told me that he’d actually weighed the tackle and bait he carried to a typical match and multiplied it by the loading into the car, out of the car, on to the trolley, off the trolley and so on, to get the total weight lifted......remarking “it’s like doing a shift on a coal wagon”. Within months I’d sold all mine.

Now the weight/numbers of fish caught doesn’t matter, the waters are scenic and peaceful, the actual fishing is just as absorbing. l can take my time and just “stand and stare” if I feel like it. Plus after each session I get back in the car feeling refreshed and thinking about things I might try, or flies I might tie, for next time, rather than just being exhausted and dreading having to unload all that gear out of the car when I get home.
See that's it I go for a day I switch my phone off sit down have a brew enjoy my surroundings see if theirs movement aand take my day from there if I catch its a bonus if I don't I have had a fabulous day wind rain or shine..
G
 

easker1

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I used to take sea anglers out . we had a good day with some huge coley, I said Take one if you want and then put them back but they wanted to take the lot so they could get a big photo, I said if you do we go ashore, they were a bit miffed , I said that it wasn't a bottomless pit and that I would only take fish if I could use them,so they practiced C&R for the rest of the drift , and only took away what they would use, (not coley) we ended up with some decent plaice, I know it's a bit silly against what the Trawlers are taking , we have to play our part as well, it is some years since I ate a trout, Game fish are too valuable to be caught only once ( Lee Wulff) easker1
 

bigmaggie

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one question i would like to ask if you were fishing say a 5 acre lake and paying £50 for a 4 fish catch and kill ticket how many would worry about numbers
george
 

PaulD

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one question i would like to ask if you were fishing say a 5 acre lake and paying £50 for a 4 fish catch and kill ticket how many would worry about numbers
george
Lechlade is £75 for a 'Full Day', 4 fish catch and kill ticket .Your 'Full Day' ends when fish number 4 has been caught and killed . . . unless you go and purchase another £75 ticket.

Speaks volumes about the descent of attitudes with regards to 'a day's fishing'.
 

loxie

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I go fishing for any number of reasons. I like to catch but it certainly isn't everything. I mostly salmon fish and you have to accept there will be blank days, pretty frequently, wherever you go. What I am not though, is happy to fish with no chance. That is called standing in a river waving a stick NOT fishing!
 
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