Keep Pesky Insects Away

3lbgrayling

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Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
32,198
Location
Central Scotland
I used this up the west coast of Scotland last week for midges. it worked in all but the worst attacks,when I had to use a headnet as well to continue to fish.The midges did not bite,but were swarming so much that I could not put up with them crawling in my eyes ,up my nose ,in my mouth and ears.9/10.Recommended.This was the ultrathon 35% deet.

Jim
 

Editor

Fish&Fly
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Jun 8, 2009
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Location
Brighton, UK
Richard - fair question.

Here is what 3M themselves say on their site with regard to the safety of Deet.

"Although it is true that there have been rare reports of seizures and neurological side effects associated with DEET use, it is important to realise how rare these reports are. The Environmental Protection Agency in the USA estimates that 200 million people use DEET repellent every year. After more than eight billion applications of DEET worldwide, there have been only 21 cases reported in the medical literature in which the use of DEET seemed to have been associated with the development of neurological toxicity. Six of these cases were a direct result of deliberate ingestion. Twelve of these 21 cases resolved completely, without any residual effects. When the EPA reviewed all available DEET human and animal neurotoxicity data in 1998, they concluded there was no evidence that DEET was a selective neurotoxin. Even if all the reported cases of neurological toxicity ascribed to DEET use were confirmed, the real-life risk of neurological side effects from DEET would be less than 1 in 100 million users."

FAQ's: 3M UK & Ireland
 

richardw

Trade Member
Joined
May 18, 2006
Messages
10,571
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On the banks of the Derbyshire Wye
I have been using deet based reppellents for 40+ years and I have not noticed any weird side effects.:whistle::whistle:

Jim

Ah but we have! Just read some of your posts :eek: !

Only joking :D

richard

---------- Post added at 04:17 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:14 PM ----------

Richard - fair question.

Here is what 3M themselves say on their site with regard to the safety of Deet.

"Although it is true that there have been rare reports of seizures and neurological side effects associated with DEET use, it is important to realise how rare these reports are. The Environmental Protection Agency in the USA estimates that 200 million people use DEET repellent every year. After more than eight billion applications of DEET worldwide, there have been only 21 cases reported in the medical literature in which the use of DEET seemed to have been associated with the development of neurological toxicity. Six of these cases were a direct result of deliberate ingestion. Twelve of these 21 cases resolved completely, without any residual effects. When the EPA reviewed all available DEET human and animal neurotoxicity data in 1998, they concluded there was no evidence that DEET was a selective neurotoxin. Even if all the reported cases of neurological toxicity ascribed to DEET use were confirmed, the real-life risk of neurological side effects from DEET would be less than 1 in 100 million users."

FAQ's: 3M UK & Ireland

Thank you. I was a little worried as I have larrupped the stuff all over my exposed skin this summer and would hate to think it might make me worse than I already am...
:)
richard
 

Guest100

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Joined
May 8, 2009
Messages
10,276
Location
North Wales
DEET never dun me nun harm.
to_pick_ones_nose_eat.gif
 

FlyForumAdmin

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2008
Messages
670
This fly spray worked very well but I did have one costly bite when a horse fly/stout fly found its way into my hair in the small hole at the back of my cap. I was walking back from the Falls Pool on the Hunt River when it struck.
It took a chunk of my head with it and there is still a lump! I dropped everything and broke my costa sunglasses on the rocky ground. Back to polaroids!

The stout did not live long after that!

Richard


"horse fly, horse fly [Credit: Dennis Ray]horse fly: Tabanus trimaculatus [Credit: Fran Hall from The National Audubon Society Collection/Photo Researchers-EB Inc.]any member of the insect family Tabanidae (order Diptera), but more specifically any member of the genus Tabanus. These stout flies, as small as a housefly or as large as a bumble bee, are sometimes known as greenheaded monsters; their metallic or iridescent eyes meet dorsally in the male and are separate in the female. Gad fly, a nickname, may refer either to the fly’s roving habits or to its mouthparts, which resemble a wedge-shaped miner’s tool. Other such names are breeze fly and ear fly. One of the most common species (Tabanus lineola) has bright-green eyes and is known as green head. The genus Chrysops, usually known as deer fly, is slightly smaller than Tabanus and has dark markings on the wings."
 
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