Keeping it simple - your advice and experience please

bobnudd

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I only have two rods one for rivers and one for still water. Do have four reels thought with different lines. On rivers if it's dry I'll have a waistcoat on with two boxes of flies dries and nymphs, a spool of nylon, floatant and I have my cap with magnifier clipped on. If it's wet I put it all in my coat pocket. Oh and my net clipped on.On the boat I have a small bag with the reels with different lines on and some extra boxes of flies. When we are out on the Lough's we take a lot more cooking gear and food than tackle
 

shropshire_lad

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I only have two rods one for rivers and one for still water. Do have four reels thought with different lines. On rivers if it's dry I'll have a waistcoat on with two boxes of flies dries and nymphs, a spool of nylon, floatant and I have my cap with magnifier clipped on. If it's wet I put it all in my coat pocket. Oh and my net clipped on.On the boat I have a small bag with the reels with different lines on and some extra boxes of flies. When we are out on the Lough's we take a lot more cooking gear and food than tackle
I have to say reels are one area where things have improved over the years I have been out of the game. I have a Greys GTS500 reel which I bought with three spools pre-loaded with lines. The cartridge nature of the spools makes changing easy and cheap. I also like the large arbor design. Not the prettiest but it seems to balance all my rods quite nicely.

That said, I do remember having a Leeda LC years ago which worked on a similar principle, although not large arbor.
 

speytime

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Like others I exercise a minimal approach to the river, all I need is a small waist pack to fit in everything I need.
Stillwater fishing is a completely different thing, in the past i was taking my gear out for a day on the boat and my neighbour asked if I was going away for the weekend, I'm not even kidding!
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This is the contents of the waist pack from a few nights back.
That aside around midnight a chap appeared out the darkness with a pair of African/bongo type drums and a bottle of red wine wtf! he was a pleasant enough chap and the drums were actually pleasant sounding, I expected them to be more irritating than enjoyable... the things you see and hear fishing 🤣

Al
 
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anzac

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I have to say reels are one area where things have improved over the years I have been out of the game. I have a Greys GTS500 reel which I bought with three spools pre-loaded with lines. The cartridge nature of the spools makes changing easy and cheap. I also like the large arbor design. Not the prettiest but it seems to balance all my rods quite nicely.

That said, I do remember having a Leeda LC years ago which worked on a similar principle, although not large arbor.
I agree that having modern reels with easy spool interchangeability saves us having to carry an extra reel with a different line to meet changing conditions. This is why I usually buy an extra spool whenever I get a new reel.
 

ohanzee

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I have heard rumours that @ohanzee roams highland lochs with just a few flies in his box.
Most of my fishing is pretty remote so I'm limited to what I can carry on my back to last a couple of days, food and gear mainly so limited space for fishing tackle, it needs to be paired down to the essentials but it is one form of fishing that lends itself to that, rod and reel aside most of my gear fits in pockets and I use a Wyattesque philosophy for flies, ie. a terrestrial, an emerger and a nymph covers most flies that trout eat, DHS, DHE and PTN, I add a griffiths gnat to that, half a dozen of each keeps me going for days.

After getting used to that you feel a bit daft packing extra gear for a leisurely afternoon on the river so the only thing that changes is the flies, I don't wear waders now either, that presented an interesting new challenge.
 

ohanzee

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Skinny-fishing instead of skinny-dipping? Or should that be skinny-dapping?
Neither, just staying on the bank, changes things a bit, frustrating when you can't reach a rise that would have been easy with waders but a surprising number of unspooked fish.
 

DutyDruid

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I've kept it quite minimal. I own the following rods:

8'6" 4wt leeda volaire
8'6" 5/6wt daiwa whisker (freebie)
9'6" 7wt shakey (for carp)
9' 8/9wt airflo for pike/saltwater

A reel for each rod. I have the wychwood SLA mk2 for the 9wt outfit with 3 spools.

Waders/boot/airflo vest backpack.

Small net for wading, larger folder for lakes and big net for carp/pike.

The 4 and 7wts will be getting upgraded in the coming year.

The freebie daiwa is a dream to cast, the action fits me really well such a shame its 2 peice though.
Lucky man, getting a freebie rod.
 

taffy1

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For each of my rods I have 2 reels, back up's if required, reservoir/stillwaters, a waist-bag which carries most of what I need. Rivers, I have a rod for the situation & river I'm fishing, trout will be a #4 or #5 8'6 to a 10' rod, depending on method. Sea trout & salmon a range from #7 rods to #9/#10, again depnding on the particular river & the prevailing conditions. These are 9'6" up to 14' 1" rods. Flies/lures, spools of nylon, forceps, nips, or scissors, net on a "D" ring & priest if required, are carried in a wading jacket or vest.
 

GEK79

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May 16, 2020
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I don’t boat fish so it’s one rod and reel, a lanyard with a small fly box, two reels of tippet, forceps, rubber band, CDC oil, and the smallest size Swiss Army knife. In one pocket will be a metal sweets can with larger, bushy flies that would be crushed in the fly box and I will always carry a net of some kind, pan when wading and handled when I have to fish from the bank.
The lanyard on the fly box is a great idea one trip at the river I bent down and the top pocket was open luckily the fly box floated and got stuck in an eddy.. Good idea..
 

PaulD

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Yes, but surely that rise would remain the same distance out if you waded in after it?
Only if you wade badly. If you wade badly, make excessive disturbance the fish will stop rising and maybe move out of its lie. Wade slowly . . . quietly . . . no disturbance . . . fish will continue to rise in their position.
 

codyarrow

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Only if you wade badly. If you wade badly, make excessive disturbance the fish will stop rising and maybe move out of its lie. Wade slowly . . . quietly . . . no disturbance . . . fish will continue to rise in their position.
I disagree in the context of the highland loch, which is what the original point refers to, wading can absolutely kill the fishing from the bank. If you can catch without wading it is the way to go - even quiet subtle wading puts the fish off or moves them out on may lochs.
Not a 100% rule - just a general rule IMO.
 

shropshire_lad

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I disagree in the context of the highland loch, which is what the original point refers to, wading can absolutely kill the fishing from the bank. If you can catch without wading it is the way to go - even quiet subtle wading puts the fish off or moves them out on may lochs.
Not a 100% rule - just a general rule IMO.
The mistake I always made on my favourite Welsh lakes was to wade to readily. Big stones crunching under my feet and then seeing fish rise behind me. One of the many misconceptions I had about fishing is fish always lie in the distance and not in very shallow water.
 

ohanzee

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I disagree in the context of the highland loch, which is what the original point refers to, wading can absolutely kill the fishing from the bank. If you can catch without wading it is the way to go - even quiet subtle wading puts the fish off or moves them out on may lochs.
Not a 100% rule - just a general rule IMO.
Certain lochs or certain times, never quit figured it out but I know a couple where wading can knock it out for days, yet others or maybe different times wading seems to be just a temporary and very local spook issue, but it is critical, step into the water on some lochs and its a goner, yet what does sometimes work in other places is wading out and not fishing, give it a good 15 mins until fish accept your presence and start rising, its tempting to cast at the first rise but wait and you can have fish right under the rod, why don't we have threads that untangle these mysteries?
 
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taffy1

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Wading comes into it's own at night on rivers, simply because it reduces the size of silhouette the angler presents to a quarry, standing high on a riverbank, even in darkness, will put a fish down due to any form of silhouette. How come though are heron & such like wading birds successful?
 

ohanzee

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I disagree in the context of the highland loch, which is what the original point refers to, wading can absolutely kill the fishing from the bank. If you can catch without wading it is the way to go - even quiet subtle wading puts the fish off or moves them out on may lochs.
Not a 100% rule - just a general rule IMO.
I thought I had posted but it seems to have vanished, rivers too, wading can give a stealth advantage obviously but a couple of experiences not wading on stretches that I previously waded surprised me, bit like watching a hatch without a rod in hand gave a new perspective, one was a long pool on the Clyde that you can only really reach fish by wading, going without waders I had to crawl on my belly and it took ages but when I got to the edge fish were rising a rods length away and they were way bigger than I had seen in that pool, Richard Ward's theory of the 'gate keeper' in action? if not familiar he posted a thing on it here and in his blog, its insightful, describes the dynamic of a pool from a trouts perspective, the smaller fish taking up the rear formation with the strongest fish in the prime food supply, when we wade we can spook the smaller fish forward and alert the best fish and so on, anyway, going without waders lets you see some situations where not wading gives the advantage, ones you wouldn't see if..your wading, unfortunately and annoyingly it also lets you see where wading is the best option.
 

speytime

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Wading comes into it's own at night on rivers, simply because it reduces the size of silhouette the angler presents to a quarry, standing high on a riverbank, even in darkness, will put a fish down due to any form of silhouette. How come though are heron & such like wading birds successful?
Stealth I think?

Al
 
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