lack of insect life

johnclayton

Well-known member
Points
0
Location
Preston, Lancashire
This is a problem that is getting worse and recommend that everyone goes on George Mombiot website at George Monbiot and have a read at some of his articles.
In particular go the category on farming and look at the article called 'Another Silent Spring', which makes scary reading.
His articles are all well researched and he doesn't pull any punches.

JohnClayton
 

Tommy Ruffe

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Ecclesfield Parish
It's a funny old world sometimes, today I've witnessed the biggest hatch of Mayfly that I've seen for years, not one or two but hundreds, clouds of them dancing around the edges of the reservoir, fish eagerly taking them.
I'll have to check the web to find which mayflies they are.
As I said, funny old world.:confused:

Ephemera Vulgata.
It's a shame I missed that at Morehall - it must have been a rare spectacle. I was psyched up for the mayfly hatch at the end of May and well into June but it was virtually non-existent.

The mayfly hatch over past four seasons that I've been a member has been very sparse indeed but I've still seen a few hatching today (19th September). The hatches seem sparser and over a longer period of time and I've yet to see the trout latch onto them in any numbers. :confused:

I also had a day at Ladybower during, what was traditionally, the height the mayfly hatch (around the 6th of June) during which I barely counted half a dozen hatch out!

The best hatch I've seen in recent years was about 7 years ago at Scout Dyke when I took 19 fish in a short, afternoon session.

Does anyone have any theories as to why they are so sparse?
 
G

guest54

Guest
I don't have an answer to that but I do remember an artical about Mayflies and apparently the nymph can spend between 2 and 5 years or more before hatching thereby ensuring continuity should there be a bad year. This means of course that in any one year nymphs from several years eggs will hatch together. Seems that nature has most bases covered, Pity man doesn't.
 

badcaster

Well-known member
Points
18
Over the past 3-4 years there has been some really inclement weather during the peak times which has not helped the spinners return, so maybe this is a factor also?

This year however, we do not have this excuse to fall back on as we had a high pressure firmly in charge for at least 2-3 weeks peak time which meant the spinners had every opportunity to return to the water when required.

Lets wait for 2-3 years time to test this theory out??
 

Tommy Ruffe

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Ecclesfield Parish
Gone are the days, in the 90's, when there were good hatches of mayfly at Ladybower Reservoir. They used to peak around the 6th of June and would start in the early afternoons instigating some good rises. Over the past few seasons there has just been a trickle of hatches throughout the day - what's that all about?

Morehall too had some great falls of black gnats when I first joined 8 years ago and made for some great sport - over the past five seasons I've barely seen any!

There does appear to be a general decline in fly life and I don't believe it's just natural cycles alone.
 

sewinbasher

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
North East Wales
One of our members has recently analysed the NRW kick sampling data on the river Clwyd which is suffering from agricultural pollution. The results show two disturbing things very clearly. Firstly, the variety of invertebrates present reduces as you move downstream and secondly the abundance of those present also diminishes as you move downstream with upwings virtually absent at the downstream end. Only gammarus seem to do well.
 

oldbull

Well-known member
Points
18
Location
Swansea
Not surprising, as stoneflies and mayflies are very sensitive to pollution; shrimp (Gammarus) are a bit less sensitive to pollution.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
113
This has reminded me to build another bee hotel, the last one's begun to decompose. I was surprised at the uptake, solitary bees filled it.
This is a good time of year to put one together, ready for the spring.
Cracking article here on how to make a simple one that works -

https://www.foxleas.com/make-a-bee-hotel.asp
 

Fishtales

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Central Scotland
Not surprising, as stoneflies and mayflies are very sensitive to pollution; shrimp (Gammarus) are a bit less sensitive to pollution.
There is a small list of bio-indicators in this article.

 
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