Lead backs 2.0

luke troutstalker

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More lead antics that may be of use. I have found that trying to cut a thin strip with shears from roofing piece is nigh on impossible, it just curls up and the edges are rubbish. I like the idea of having a material you can work with to get the weight you want, as opposed to those awful tungsten things.

Had an idea today, and it works quite well, although it's not something you'd do at the tying bench, and you need a proper vice, soft jaws and a chisel, general garage stuff. It's a bit of a fart about, but you get a nice uniform bit of lead you can then trim at the tying desk.

Clamp some sheet inbetween soft jaws, just enough to pinch it. Lay alongside it something of a thickness you want the lead to end up as , in this case it's a 1/16" brass strip.




With the back of the chisel, push the lead down so it's flush with your guage.




It'll look like this, clamp the vice up tight.




With the chisel, slice away the lead sheet using the soft jaws as an edge to cut against.




Cut a few, and tap them straight with a block of something hard. They don't take much to get them straight.




At the desk, cut to length, and trim the edges. Nail clippers are really good for this.



 

diawl bach

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Good idea, I've got a stack of lead but despite this I've still bought lead wire in the past, that looks like a nice,simple way to get a lifetime's supply.
 

diawl bach

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Finally getting round to tying a few grayling flies and remembered this thread.

Nipped down the shed, put a strip of flattened scrap lead in the jaws of a B&D Workmate with about 10 mm proud of the surface and took a plane to it. Made several passes, the lead peeled off as swarf. The metal's a bit curly initially but it doesn't take any effort to make it useful. Really quick to do this and easy to regulate the thickness of the wire by adjusting the depth of the plane blade. All fly tying is derivative, cheers for the idea LS -

lead.jpg
 

luke troutstalker

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It's only taken 7 years, but finally something of use! :D

The plane idea is a level better than mine, flat lead foil for nowt. Good thinking :thumbs:

---------- Post added at 08:33 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:33 PM ----------

Superb, did you find the ideal gauge lead for this? I'll be wanting them for hooks #12 &14 really.



Rich, sorry I missed this. About 1.2mm is a nice thickness
 

bibio1st

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Mike told me a good way to do them, once you've shaped the lead score the top of it with a stanley blade, it helps stopping the thread slipping, once you have it in place give it a coat of varnish, that helps keeping it in place and helps the dubbing stick to the body making it more durable.

Steve
 

luke troutstalker

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The nicks in the lead help prevent the thread slipping off the lead when tying it on. The varnish on the thread helps prevent the dubbing noodle slipping off when coming down towards the eye. It's not so bad at the back end, as it rests against the previous wrap.
 

diawl bach

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Do you superglue the lead to the shank to hold it Col?
S.

It's been so long since I tied any heavy nymphs without using beads I can't remember is the honest answer. Just chucked away a packet of body stretch which has degenerated to the point of decomposition since I last tied any shrimp/ caddis grubs, that's set things back. Like the idea of scoring the lead, glue sounds like a good option. Don't expect any photos for a while..

It's only taken 7 years, but finally something of use!
I know, those vices were crep :D
 

sawyer

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Form experience of using lead in the past for worm fishing (when allowed), the older the lead the better it is to use. The new stuff is to hard whereas the lead from the roof off my factory in Stockport is very soft & malleable. Staff dont seem to mind the leaks either!
 
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